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The 93 Best Shows on Netflix Right Now (June 2024)

Geek Girl came out of its shell

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Allison Picurro, Tim Surette

Lady Whistledown is not going anywhere: Bridgerton Season 3 is returning this month. Since the first half of the season launched in May, the internet has been buzzing with #Polin memes, Regency-era inspired festivities, and, of course, reactions to that steamy carriage scene. 

But before the period romance comes back for Season 3 Part 2, there are plenty of other series to watch on Netflix. The latest additions to our list of must-watch shows include the YA charmer Geek Girl, TVGuide favorite Evil, and the hit series Baby Reindeer — which, contrary to what its title suggests, has nothing to do with Christmas and gives no Hallmark vibes.

Other shows we've added to this list recently include the Australian high school drama Hearthbreak High; the artsy Ripley, starring Andrew Scott as the popular con man; and the Korean horror series Parasyte: The Grey.

This list is weighted toward the best shows to watch on Netflix right now, which means recently released Netflix Originals take priority, though you'll find legacy Netflix shows further down the list. These are only the most relevant and worthwhile shows to watch on Netflix.  

Last updated June 20, newer additions are at the top.

Bridgerton

For fans of: Enemies-to-lovers, friends-to-lovers, really-anything-to-lovers, scandals
Number of seasons: 3 (renewed up to 4)

Luke Newton and Nicola Coughlan, Bridgerton

Luke Newton and Nicola Coughlan, Bridgerton 

Liam Daniel/Netflix

Since the start of Bridgerton, Penelope Featherington (Nicola Coughlan) has harbored feelings for Colin Bridgerton (Luke Newton). Season 3 will finally explore this friends-to-lovers relationship, and make Penelope — who is secretly Lady Whistledown — the subject of her own gossip column. Bridgerton is based on Julia Quinn's historical romance novels, and the first two seasons chronologically followed the love stories in the original titles. Season 3 skips the third book, An Offer From a Gentleman, which is focused on Benedict Bridgerton (Luke Thompson), and adapts the fourth, Romancing Mister Bridgerton. It's #Polin time. -Kat Moon [Trailer]

Geek Girl

For fans of: Transformations, positive depictions of neurodiversity
Number of seasons: 1

Emily Carey, Geek Girl

Emily Carey, Geek Girl

Ray Burmiston/Netflix

Based on the YA novel by Holly Smale, Geek Girl is a modern-day fairy tale about an awkward high schooler (House of the Dragon's Emily Carey) who goes from pushover to makeover when she's discovered by a modeling agency and makes a splash in the business. It's an easy-breezy series that has a positive message about being yourself, and thanks to some enlightening depictions of neurodiversity — Carey's Harriet is never labeled as autistic, but there are certainly indicators that she is — is more important than its peers. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Evil

For fans of: The X-Files, Rosemary's Baby, demons with retainers
Number of seasons: 2 (on Netflix) (Season 4 premiered May 23 on Paramount+)

Aasif Mandvi, Katja Herbers, and Mike Colter, Evil

Aasif Mandvi, Katja Herbers, and Mike Colter, Evil

Elizabeth Fisher, CBS

If your definition of prestige television isn't big enough for a streaming procedural about exorcism, Evil will change that. Robert and Michelle King's supernatural drama returned for its fourth season May 23 on Paramount+, but if you don't have Paramount+ and you do have Netflix, this is your chance to catch the first two seasons. Evil — which stars Katja HerbersMike Colter, and Aasif Mandvi as a trio of investigators looking into claims of demonic activity on behalf of the Catholic Church — is sublimely cool, using its case-of-the-week formula to tell barbed parables about modern anxieties, all while having more fun than anything else on TV. The cast, which also includes Michael Emerson as our heroes' gleeful antagonist, nails Evil's tricky, off-kilter tone, which dances between winking playfulness and the creeping sense that something is really wrong here. On Evil, it ultimately doesn't matter whether the shadow in the corner is a demon or it's all in your head. What matters is that you can't look away. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer] [More shows like Evil]

Baby Reindeer            

For fans of: You, I May Destroy You
Number of seasons: 1

Richard Gadd, Baby Reindeer

Richard Gadd, Baby Reindeer

Ed Miller/Netflix

Based on a true story that was turned into a stage play by creator and star Richard GaddBaby Reindeer follows a middling stand-up comedian named Donny (Gadd) whose chance encounter with a lonely woman named Martha (Jessica Gunning) turns his life into a nightmare. The series is about more than just a stalker, though. The second half of Baby Reindeer details Donny's experience as a victim of grooming and sexual abuse by a TV writer who promises to further Donny's career, and how that informs all aspects of his life — from his evolving sexuality to his difficulties with intimacy, and even his relationship with Martha. -Tim Surette [Trailer] [More shows like Baby Reindeer]

More recommendations:

Heartbreak High            

For fans of: Euphoria, Sex Education, Aussie accents
Number of seasons: 2

Chloe Hayden, James Majoos, and Ayesha Madon, Heartbreak High

Chloe Hayden, James Majoos, and Ayesha Madon, Heartbreak High

Lisa Tomasetti/Netflix

As long as teens make dumb mistakes and hopefully learn from them, we'll always have the high school drama, and Heartbreak High — winner of a 2023 International Emmy — is one of the best to come out in the last decade. A remake of the mid '90s series that aired in Australia, the new version is updated with today's teens' problems, like gender identity and sexual fluidity, while also sticking with the classics of overbearing parents, bullying, and sex. But it's the characters, unlikely positive support systems, and earnestness that make Heartbreak High a more rewarding watch than the typical teen drama. Season 2 adds a new P.E. teacher and a celibacy-pushing new classmate, and hopefully Ca$h gets out of trouble with the police following one of the most romantic arrests in TV history. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Parasyte: The Grey            

For fans of: Korean horror, Resident Evil
Number of seasons: 1

Parasyte: The Grey

Parasyte: The Grey

Netflix

This South Korean sci-fi horror TV series from Train to Busan director Yeon Sang-ho is a live-action spin-off of the manga by Hitoshi Iwaaki, and depicts all the awful things that happen when parasitic organisms from outer space come to Earth and turn humans into killing machines. What's more, all sorts of disgusting tentacles and tendrils pop out of the host bodies' heads like jack-in-the-boxes. The story isn't too complicated, but the action sequences will keep you glued to the screen. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Ripley            

For fans of: Con men, sociopaths, and beauty
Number of seasons: 1

Andrew Scott, Ripley

Andrew Scott, Ripley

Netflix

What if the story of The Talented Mr. Ripley was depicted as it truly is: a chilling tale of a sociopath whose lust for deviancy leads to a murdering spree? Creator Steven Zaillian takes Patricia Highsmith's story and turns it into a polar opposite of the popular 1999 Matt Damon and Jude Law movie, filming everything in stark black and white and spending more time getting in the head of con man Thomas Ripley (played exquisitely by Andrew Scott) while he heads to Italy to convince a wealthy layabout to return home to America at the request of the father. Ripley has divided viewers, with some saying Scott is too old and the pacing is too slow, but I loved the tension and the careful character examination. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

The Magic Prank Show            

For fans of: Magic for Humans, Punk'd, elaborate stunts
Number of seasons: 1

Justin Willman, The Magic Prank Show

Justin Willman, The Magic Prank Show

Netflix

Justin Willman, known best as the sorcerer from Netflix's Magic for Humans, uses his powers of illusion for delicious revenge in his new show, The Magic Prank Show. Soliciting requests for playful payback from the internet, Willman and a team of practical magicians hatch plans for elaborate pranks on friends, siblings, and partners involving exploding heads, blindfolded rideshare drivers, and more. It's part Mythbusters and part Punk'd, and good-natured enough that even when things seem to go too far, everyone has a good time. Willman also makes his work relatable with personal anecdotes, just like he did with Magic for Humans, but don't expect any Magic for Susans. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

3 Body Problem         

For fans of: Brainy confusion, slow alien invasions, "what if?" scenarios
Number of seasons: 1

Eiza González, 3 Body Problem

Eiza González, 3 Body Problem

Netflix

Netflix's biggest new series in a long time is this adaptation of Cixin Liu's epic sci-fi novel from Game of Thrones creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss and True Blood's Alexander Woo. Set across multiple timelines and in different countries, 3 Body Problem is a global thriller about scientists attempting to thwart an impending alien invasion. Unlike its peers in the genre, 3 Body Problem is heavily rooted in science, and the invasion will take 400 years to arrive, so it plays with theoretical solutions rather than building a big gun. Though its heady approach is not for everyone, you should at least watch through Episode 5 to see what happens to a boat carrying pro-alien cultists. It's rad. -Tim Surette [Trailer] [Review]

Girls5eva         

For fans of: Netflix saving good shows, jokes
Number of seasons: 3

Sara Bareilles, Paula Pell, Busy Philipps, and Renee Elise Goldsberry, Girls5eva

Sara Bareilles, Paula Pell, Busy Philipps, and Renee Elise Goldsberry, Girls5eva

Emily V Aragones/Netflix

One of TV's best comedies of the 2020s had the distinct disadvantage of being a Peacock original, but with a new life on Netflix, it's turning in some of its best work ever. Girls5eva follows a semi-successful '90s girl group that tries to make a comeback in the 2020s, with age, a changed entertainment business landscape, and a disinterested population getting in the way. It's produced by Tina Fey and Robert Carlock and created by Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt's Meredith Scardino, so it's packed with rapid-fire jokes and has its sights dead set on pop culture. The main cast — Sara BareillesRenée Elise GoldsberryBusy Philipps, and Paula Pell — is phenomenal, and a steady stream of well-known guest stars and original songs keep it fresh. Both Peacock seasons are now on Netflix, as is an all-new Netflix-exclusive Season 3. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Avatar: The Last Airbender         

For fans of: Live-action remakes, not feeling too beholden to nostalgia
Number of seasons: 1 (renewed for Seasons 2 and 3)

Gordon Cormier, Avatar: The Last Airbender

Gordon Cormier, Avatar: The Last Airbender

Netflix

The announcement of Netflix's live-action version of Avatar: The Last Airbender was either a dream or a nightmare, depending on how protective you were of your childhood. And yes, reactions were mixed, covering both ends of the spectrum and a lot of the middle, as the darker version of the cherished cartoon forges its own path. Not quite as big a success as Netflix's One Piece remake, it's still a serviceable tale of a young savior with the ability to save the world from a threat, especially if you're coming into the franchise as a newbie. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Warrior         

For fans of: Netflix saving good shows, action of the kicking and punching variety
Number of seasons: 3

Andrew Koji, Warrior

Andrew Koji, Warrior

David Bloomer/Max

Warrior is a breakthrough in Asian representation on the screen, but that's just a bonus of this action drama that's reaching a new audience on Netflix after a quiet life on Cinemax and Max. Based on the writings of Bruce Lee and brought to the screen by his daughter Shannon, Warrior's depiction of the Tong Wars in San Francisco in the late 1800s is appropriately gruesome and takes more turns than Lombard Street, showing a time, place, and people that television somehow always overlooks. It's Peaky Blinders with an added layer of racial issues. It's Gangs of New York with more flying kicks. But it's also wholly original as a story of immigrants making their way in a country that only barely tolerated them and fighting back against that hatred. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

One Day         

For fans of: Years and years of romance, Now That's What I Call Music! ('80s and '90s U.K. edition) 
Number of seasons: 1

Ambika Mod and Leo Woodall, One Day

Ambika Mod and Leo Woodall, One Day

Teddy Cavendish/Netflix

True love doesn't happen overnight, despite what romantic dramas would lead you to believe, and in this adaptation of David Nicholls' book, it takes decades. Leo Woodall and Ambika Mod will make you believe in love at 1000th sight, as we follow Dexter (Woodall) and Emma (Mod) on one day each year from the late '80s to the '00s, with all the ups and downs in between. The 14-episode limited series may seem intimidating at first, but the abbreviated run times (about 30 minutes each episode) make this a breezy binge. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Griselda 

For fans of: Narcos, biographical dramas, underdog stories
Number of seasons: 1

Sofia Vergara, Griselda

Sofia Vergara, Griselda

Netflix

This time, Sofia Vergara is the boss. The Modern Family alum stars in and executive produces Griselda, an inspired-by-a-true-story limited series about Griselda Blanco, a Colombian businesswoman who became "the Godmother" of one of the most profitable cartels in history. As a bonus, the show is set in the colorful underworld of 1970-'80s Miami, so you know the outfits are going to go wild. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Love on the Spectrum U.S. 

For fans of: Love, tender documentaries
Number of seasons: 2

Love on the Spectrum U.S.

Love on the Spectrum U.S.

Netflix

This heartwarming series is an American edition of the Australian reality documentary series following the dating lives of people on the autism spectrum. Like the original, the U.S. version is empathetic and deeply moving as it follows these lovable young people on their journeys to find love. It won the Emmy for Outstanding Unstructured Reality Program in 2022. In Season 2, the show catches up with many of your favorites from Season 1 as they continue to look for love or take the next step in their new relationships. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]

Boy Swallows Universe

For fans of: Coming-of-age stories, dark humor
Number of seasons: 1

Travis Fimmel and Phoebe Tonkin, Boy Swallows Universe

Travis Fimmel and Phoebe Tonkin, Boy Swallows Universe

Netflix

Australian author Trent Dalton's debut book Boy Swallows Universe gets adapted for Netflix in this seven-episode limited series that's for anyone looking for a coming-of-age story with a dash of crime and a warm heart. It follows Eli Bell, a young teenager whose mom is a former drug addict, stepdad is a heroin dealer, brother is mute, and father is in prison, as he stumbles into a life of crime to help out his family. Despite that setup, it's a warm family drama with plenty of humor to keep it humming. Look out for strong performances from Travis Fimmel and Phoebe Tonkin, as well as a star-making turn for young Felix Cameron. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

The Brothers Sun

For fans of: Warrior, Daredevil, Michelle Yeoh
Number of seasons: 1

Michelle Yeoh, The Brothers Sun

Michelle Yeoh, The Brothers Sun

Netflix

Imagine finding out that your family runs a notorious triad and that your estranged brother is its deadliest weapon. That's what happens to Bruce Sun (Sam Song Li) when his older sibling Charles (Justin Chien) suddenly appears in Los Angeles and reveals the unthinkable life he's lived as a Taiwanese gangster. Only it's not unthinkable to their mom, Eileen (Michelle Yeoh): Mama Sun deliberately left Taiwan years ago to leave the family's criminal past behind, and brought only Bruce with her. Come for Michelle Yeoh mothering, stay for two brothers finding each other — and themselves. -Kat Moon [Trailer]

Blue Eye Samurai

For fans of: Hapas, gorgeous violence, tales of revenge
Number of seasons: 1 (renewed for Season 2)

Blue Eye Samurai

Blue Eye Samurai

Netflix

Netflix is on a hot streak with animation — just look at the next few entries on this list — but the best of the bunch might be Blue Eye Samurai, a French-American co-production about a half-white half-Japanese female samurai (Onna-musha) in 17th century Japan on a quest for vengeance against four men. The critically acclaimed series features the voice talent of Maya Erskine, Darren Barnett, Masi Oka, George Takei, and Brenda Song. It ain't for kids though; in addition to digit-severing violence, there's nudity that would make your mom blush. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Scott Pilgrim Takes Off

For fans of: Michael Cera, twisty shows, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World 
Number of seasons: 1

Scott Pilgrim Takes Off

Scott Pilgrim Takes Off

Netflix

The biggest headline surrounding Scott Pilgrim Takes Off, the upcoming anime adaptation of Bryan Lee O'Malley's graphic novels, is that the entire cast from Scott Pilgrim vs. the WorldEdgar Wright's 2010 cult favorite film, reassembled to reprise their roles. Everyone from Michael Cera as the titular lovelorn slacker to Chris Evans as pompous "pretty good actor" Lucas Lee is back for the series, which O'Malley and co-creator BenDavid Grabinski promised is neither a direct adaptation of the movie or the books, but its own thing entirely. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

The Devil's Plan

For fans of: Mafia, board games, brainy reality shows  
Number of seasons: 1

Lee Si-won and Ha Seok-jin, The Devil's Plan

Lee Si-won and Ha Seok-jin, The Devil's Plan

Netflix

In an era when many of the hottest reality competition shows feature challenges that require more brawn than brain, The Devil's Plan is a refreshing and welcome addition to the genre. Of course, series like Survivor, Big Brother, and The Amazing Race include mental as well as physical competitions. But none of the puzzles we've seen on these long-running shows even approach the complexity of strategy games in The Devil's Plan. Director Jung Jong-yeon, who was behind the Korean reality show The Genius, produced this series that is a fierce battle of wits. 12 contestants of varying backgrounds must excel in a series of strategy games to avoid elimination and take home the cash prize. -Kat Moon [Trailer]

Escaping Twin Flames

For fans of: Cults, shocks
Number of seasons: 1

Shaleia and Jeff Ayan, Escaping Twin Flames

Shaleia and Jeff Ayan, Escaping Twin Flames

Netflix/Screengrab

The second docuseries about the matchmaking cult Twin Flames Universe in a month — Prime Video's Desperately Seeking Soulmate: Escaping Twin Flames Universe came out in early October — is the better of the two, spilling all the horrific details of what happened to its followers while also tearing down cuckoo bananas TFU founders Jeff and Shaleia Divine for the megalomaniacal grifters that they are. With interviews from former members and families ripped apart by TFU, as well as hours of recorded meetings that show just how bad things were, Escaping Twin Flames is a full evisceration of a scam that still exists today. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Pluto

For fans of: Astro Boy, Blade Runner, sentience
Number of seasons: 1

Pluto

Pluto

Netflix

Netflix might not care if you watch this gorgeous, thought-provoking anime, but we do. This adaptation of Naoki Urasawa's acclaimed manga spins off from the ultra-popular Astro Boy franchise, following a series of murders of specific robots around the world. The deaths aren't random; the targeted robots possess a certain amount of power, and Urasawa tells the story as a slow-burning murder mystery taken on by a detective who just so happens to be a robot. As the robots fall victim episode by episode, their stories are told, asking questions of artificial intelligence, robot rights, sentience, and, naturally, what it means to be human. What makes the series more than the sum of its parts is the emotional bombs its drops. There are moments of robo-sadness that will stick with you for a long time. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Bodies

For fans of: Murder mysteries, multiple timelines
Number of seasons: 1

Bodies

Bodies

Netflix

Bodies is a British limited series with a hook so simple I can't believe it hasn't been done before. Four London detectives are linked together by investigating the same murder. The catch? They're all from different time periods, spanning 1890 to 2053, and somehow they've all come across the same murdered corpse. It's being compared to the German brain-breaker Dark, which is a high compliment. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

The Fall of the House of Usher

For fans of: Mike Flanagan, Succession, monologues
Number of seasons: 1

Carla Gugino, The Fall of the House of Usher

Carla Gugino, The Fall of the House of Usher

Eike Schroter/Netflix

Mike Flanagan's final series for Netflix — some others of his, including Midnight Mass and The Haunting of Hill House, are also on this list — remixes the works of Edgar Allen Poe in a story about a pharmaceutical tycoon whose children die off one by one while he's haunted by his past. Many of Flanagan's repertory players return, as does his love of extreme gore and ghosts. (The murderous gorillas are new, though.) What struck me about House of Usher was the use of humor; this is by far Flanagan's funniest series so far, and it works really well to counterbalance his sense of doom. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Everything Now

For fans of: Euphoria, teen drama that doesn't shy away from seriousness
Number of seasons: 1

Everything Now

Everything Now

Netflix

Just as Sex Education bowed out, Everything Now checked in. This edgy, British teen comedy-drama follows a young woman who's fresh out of treatment for an eating disorder and returns to high school looking to make up for lost time by checking things off her bucket list. Partying? Check. Breaking the law? Check. Sex? Check. Yes, even though she's only missed out on several months, in teen time, that may as well be decades. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Love Is Blind

For fans of: Human drama, utter emotional chaos
Number of seasons: 5

Taylor Rue, Love Is Blind Season 5

Taylor Rue, Love Is Blind Season 5

Netflix

On this relationship reality sensation, a bunch of single people are sequestered in a house where they meet potential romantic partners. They get to know each other while talking for hours in pods where they can't see each other. Some of them get engaged, and then we follow them as they try to make it work outside of the pods and prepare for their weddings. It drops in batches of episodes over the course of a few weeks, each covering a different part of the process. It's a fascinating social experiment with jaw-dropping surprises and wild characters. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]

Wrestlers

For fans of: Cheer, wrasslin'
Number of seasons: 1

HollyHood Haley J, Wrestlers

HollyHood Haley J, Wrestlers

Netflix

Director Greg Whiteley and the team behind Netflix sports docuseries hits Cheer and Last Chance U grapple with professional wrestling in Wrestlers, which follows the owners, athletes, and fans of the Ohio Valley Wrestling league, a developmental organization that started the careers of John Cena, Brock Lesnar, Dave Bautista, and more. Sure, wrestling is more entertainment than sport, but the themes of Whiteley's other projects — grueling competition, sacrifice, and personal demons — are all over this, with the added complexity of new owners trying to make OVW a profitable business conflicting with the creative process of big sweaty men and women tossing each other over turnbuckles. It's not only just as good as Cheer and Last Chance U, it might be better. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Sex Education

For fans of: Kids discovering themselves, Gillian Anderson
Number of seasons: 4

Asa Butterfield and Emma Mackey, Sex Education

Asa Butterfield and Emma Mackey, Sex Education

Netflix

There are so many coming-of-age television series out there, but few are as brazenly honest and endearing as this oneThe comedy, which just completed its fourth and final season, is a raunchy-on-the-outside and sweet-on-the-inside charmer about a teen boy who inadvertently becomes his school's go-to sex therapist. The series explores teen sexuality in a refreshingly non-judgemental, authentic way, and it posits that whether you're the most popular kid in school or the outcast eating lunch alone, there's a universal and terrifying confusion in growing up that can be made more manageable by a supportive community and communication. Plus, Gillian Anderson co-stars as Otis' eccentric divorcée mom, who is an actual sex therapist and has a house full of phallic statues, which is just a lot of fun. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

One Piece

For fans of: Pirate adventures, epic fantasies
Number of seasons: 1 (renewed for Season 2)

Mackenyu, Jacob Romero Gibson, Emily Rudd, Taz Skylar, One Piece

Mackenyu, Jacob Romero Gibson, Emily Rudd, Taz Skylar, One Piece

Netflix

Netflix's One Piece may be the first live-action adaptation in TV history to receive generally positive reviews from anime fans. Sure, the series pales in comparison to the manga written and illustrated by Eiichiro Oda — and the anime that adapted it. But this version of One Piece exceeds expectations, with its thoughtful casting (the main Straw Hats? 10/10, no notes), intensive worldbuilding, and the obvious regard for Oda's original work. -Kat Moon [Trailer]

Heartstopper

For fans of: LGBTQ+ romances, comics come to life
Number of seasons: 2

Kit Connor and Joe Locke, Heartstopper

Kit Connor and Joe Locke, Heartstopper

Netflix

This cute and gentle British teen drama is based on a webcomic-turned-graphic novel that's beloved by fans of romantic coming-of-age stories. Heartstopper follows Charlie Spring (Joe Locke), an openly gay secondary school student who develops an unlikely friendship with Nick (Kit Connor), a jock with a kind heart who invites Charlie to join the rugby team. And their friendship just might be developing into something more. It's a sweet little show that keeps some comic book-inspired stylistic flourishes. Fans of the comic, and teen drama in general, will love it. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]

Untold

For fans of: ESPN's 30 for 30, revisiting old sports news stories
Number of seasons: 3

Jake and Logan Paul, Untold

Jake and Logan Paul, Untold

Netflix

This sports documentary anthology series goes deep into controversial sports news stories from the past, telling the real, human story behind the sensational headlines. In Season 3, the highlight episode is — whether you like it or not — focused on YouTube influencer turned clown turned pro boxer Jake Paul, showing what goes on behind the PR machine, headed by Paul himself, that has capitalized on his antihero status and turned him into a major sports draw (and the unlikely lightning rod that has revitalized boxing). Also worth checking out are Season 1's episodes on tennis player Mardy Fish and the "Malice at the Palace" NBA brawl and Season 2's breakdown of the Manti Te'o controversy involving the Heisman candidate being catfished by a fraudster. -Liam Mathews and Tim Surette [Trailer]

Sweet Magnolias

For fans of: Comfortable drama, margaritas
Number of seasons: 3

JoAnna Garcia Swisher, Brooke Elliott, and Heather Headley, Sweet Magnolias

JoAnna Garcia Swisher, Brooke Elliott, and Heather Headley, Sweet Magnolias

Netflix

This special brand of small-town drama is a fan favorite for its coziness, following the daily goings on of female friends Maddie (JoAnna Garcia Swisher), Helen (Heather Headley), and Dana Sue (Brooke Elliott) in the made-up town of Serenity, South Carolina. Expect some obstacles — but nothing too over the top — as the women navigate big and small issues with romance, careers, and family. It goes down like a cold glass of sweet tea. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Quarterback

For fans of: Football, ice baths, minivans
Number of seasons: 1

Patrick Mahomes, Quarterback

Patrick Mahomes, Quarterback

Netflix

Netflix's unobstructed blitz on sports docuseries continues with this look at the most important position in all of sports: the pigskin-slingers of the NFL. As with the streamer's other jock shows, expect full access into the lives of its subjects: Kansas City Chiefs superstar Patrick Mahomes, Minnesota Vikings hurler and minivan driver Kirk Cousins, and Atlanta Falcons scapegoat Marcus Mariota. It's great for NFL fans who want to relive the 2022 season... unless you're a fan of the teams that Mahomes steamrolled on his way to another MVP award and Super Bowl victory. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

The Witcher 

For fans of: Henry Cavill, serious fantasy
Number of seasons: 3

Henry Cavill and Anya Chalotra, The Witcher

Henry Cavill and Anya Chalotra, The Witcher

Susan Allnutt/Netflix

In this adaptation of the fantasy book series, Henry Cavill plays Geralt of Rivia, the world-weary slayer of monsters who is tasked by destiny with protecting the magical Crown Princess Ciri (Freya Allan) from many different pursuers who all want her for their own nefarious ends. While it isn't always easy to follow, Seasons 2 and 3 settle in from Season 1, which had a timeline so complicated there are jokes about it in Season 2. But it's still a hardcore fantasy show that will satisfy the nerdiest fans of Andrzej Sapkowski's multimedia franchise. Season 3 is Cavill's last as the lead as he departs the series, making way for Liam Hemsworth to take over in Season 4. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]

Our Planet I and II

For fans of: Animals on the move, harsh realities, David Attenborough
Number of seasons: 2

Our Planet II

Our Planet II

Netflix

The Planet crew is back with the second season of the eco-conscious nature documentary series that was forged from the worldwide success of the Planet Earth series. The newly released second season follows migration patterns of animals, while also raising a red flag about the fact that our planet is turning into one giant, moody weather system that's disrupting the balance of life. It can be gloomy — showing how animals react to this new world order isn't always pretty — but it still reigns as one of the best looks at the animal kingdom. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Never Have I Ever

For fans of: Teen romance, Mindy Kaling, the omniscient voice of John McEnroe
Number of seasons: 4

Maitreyi Ramakrishnan and Darren Barnet, Never Have I Ever

Maitreyi Ramakrishnan and Darren Barnet, Never Have I Ever

Lara Solanki/Netflix

Mindy Kaling's warm, wickedly funny spin on a classic high school comedy stars Maitreyi Ramakrishnan as Devi Vishwakumar, a high achiever desperate to reinvent herself after the sudden death of her father (Sendhil Ramamurthy, joining the ranks of TV's hot dads even in flashbacks). As she navigates a love triangle and denies the depth of her grief, short-tempered Devi's inner life is narrated, hilariously, by tennis legend John McEnroe. Who knew we all needed to hear John McEnroe say "thirst trap"? The series also ends with solid finality; Devi doesn't tiptoe around her feelings. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Tour de France: Unchained

For fans of: Huge quads, big crashes, enormous pain
Number of seasons: 1

Tour de France: Unchained

Tour de France: Unchained

A.S.O./Pauline Ballet

Another quality addition to Netflix's growing team of sports docuseries focuses on the world's most prestigious — and most grueling — cycling race. The French production takes you inside the peloton with the greatest cyclists in the world, as they push their bodies to the limits, take huge spills, and do whatever it takes to get the yellow jersey. This one's a bit more extreme than other Netflix sports docuseries. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Siren: Survive the Island

For fans of: Squid Game, Physical 100, team-based strategy games
Number of seasons: 1

Siren: Survive the Island

Siren: Survive the Island

Netflix

Korean television inches closer to making Squid Game a reality with this brutal team-based competition that pits groups of women against each other. Squads of four built from tough professions — firefighters, soldiers, policewomen, etc. — battle royale it out on a remote island in a game that's like Capture the Flag but more rugged. The ladies' fierceness means the violence gets real, and when the siren blares — indicating that it's time to raid each others' bases — don't be surprised to see Team Athlete bust out judo moves to eliminate other players. Add in mini-games, a unique currency system that allows teams to buy survival items, and back alley alliances, and you have one of the most tantalizing reality shows out there. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson

For fans of: Chaos, driving crooners, wet steaks, weak coffins, fart toilets, complex patterns on shirts
Number of seasons: 3

Tim Robinson, I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson

Tim Robinson, I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson

Netflix

Sometimes what you want is to see your id, your most base animal instincts, the unhinged thoughts you definitely have but rarely voice, reflected on screen. You may or may not remember Tim Robinson from his time on Saturday Night Live; honestly, they didn't really know what to do with him over there, and in retrospect it's clear that what he needed was something of his own where he could really let his freak flag fly. That's I Think You Should Leave in a nutshell! It's a madcap roller coaster of a sketch series that features Robinson playing a host of weirdo characters with big personalities and strong convictions about things that don't really matter, such as his highly memeable hot dog mascot who refuses to admit he was the one who crashed his car into a storefront. Like anything that's really, truly hilarious, it's sort of impossible to describe. You just have to watch it to understand. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

FUBAR

For fans of: True Lies, dad jokes, Arnold
Number of seasons: 1

Monica Barbaro and Arnold Schwarzenegger, FUBAR

Monica Barbaro and Arnold Schwarzenegger, FUBAR

Netflix

One of Hollywood's unwritten rules is that aging action heroes MUST star in some vehicle in which they play retired super agents who have to go back into action for some stupid reason amid a flurry of jokes about how they're too old for this sh--. And if you're one of the biggest action heroes of all time, you keep making these things. Arnold Schwarzenegger stars in this action-comedy about a CIA agent who gets pulled back into duty to rescue his daughter, who also happens to be in the CIA. The thing is, neither of them knew the other was in the CIA at all! Yeah, it's corny and not for everyone, but as long as you accept that, it can be a good time. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

XO, Kitty

For fans of: The To All the Boys trilogy, K-Pop
Number of seasons: 1

Anna Cathcart, XO, Kitty

Anna Cathcart, XO, Kitty

Park Young-Sol/Netflix

Return to the To All the Boys I've Loved Before Cinematic Universe (the TATBILBCU) with this new series spun off from the hit Netflix films. XO, Kitty, created by Jenny Han (who also wrote the books that inspired the movies), follows Kitty Covey (Anna Cathcart) as she moves to Seoul to attend the same boarding school her late mom went to. It doesn't hurt that her long-distance boyfriend, Dae (Choi Min-young) goes there, too. But when that relationship hits a snag, Lara Jean's younger sister will have to figure out what she really wants. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Queen Charlotte: A Bridgerton Story

For fans of: The insatiable urge for more Bridgerton
Number of seasons: 1

Corey Mylchreest and India Amarteifio, Queen Charlotte: A Bridgerton Story

Corey Mylchreest and India Amarteifio, Queen Charlotte: A Bridgerton Story

Liam Daniel/Netflix

Here's a no-brainer: a Bridgerton prequel series. Say less! This limited series tells the origin story of Queen Charlotte (played as an older woman by Golda Rosheuvel and as a young woman by India Ria Amarteifio), exploring her rise to power and her rocky (but still very steamy, of course) marriage to King George III (Corey Mylchreest). [Trailer]

Sweet Tooth

For fans of: Kids, animals, hybrid kid-animals, apocalyptic fantasy
Number of seasons: 2

Harvey Gui, Amie Donald, Naledi Murray, Christian Convery, Yonas Kibreab, Ruby Hall, Christopher Cooper Jnr, and Cyan Scott, Sweet Tooth

Harvey Gui, Amie Donald, Naledi Murray, Christian Convery, Yonas Kibreab, Ruby Hall, Christopher Cooper Jnr, and Cyan Scott, Sweet Tooth

Netflix

Yes, it's another show about a deadly virus that wipes out most of humanity, but it also has cute half-animal, half-human kids in it. This fantasy series follows Gus (Christian Convery), a mutant boy with deer antlers who fights against some baddies who want to round up his kind because they think killing him will solve their problems, and a reluctant hero (Nonso Anozie) who tries to protect Gus. [Trailer]

Firefly Lane

For fans of: Soapy nonsense, celebs playing dress-up, BFFs forever
Number of seasons: 2

Katherine Heigl and Sarah Chalke, Firefly Lane

Katherine Heigl and Sarah Chalke, Firefly Lane

Netflix

Netflix's gold standard for "Why am I watching this?" content is Firefly Lane, a lady friends drama starring Katherine Heigl and Sarah Chalke as besties whose relationship spans the '70s, '80s, '90s, and '00s and goes through plenty of ups and downs. It is by no means quality television, but it is definitely bingeable television. The series' final episodes premiered April 27. [Trailer]

The Diplomat

For fans of: Keri Russell cursing, Scandal, making menial behind-the-scenes politics fun
Number of seasons: 1

Ato Essandoh and Keri Russell, The Diplomat

Ato Essandoh and Keri Russell, The Diplomat

Alex Bailey/Netflix

Cocaine Bear breakout star Keri Russell (can you imagine) leads The Diplomat, a political drama that brings the Americans alum back to TV and back to the world of international intrigue. Russell plays Kate Wyler, a diplomat who's unexpectedly named the new U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom, where she manages global crises while bristling at the spotlight. The series has serious political-TV credentials — its showrunner is Debora Cahn, former writer and producer on serious shows like The West Wing and Homeland — but it likes to have some fun, too. –Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Chimp Empire

For fans of: Succession, nature documentaries
Number of seasons: 1

Chimp Empire

Chimp Empire

Netflix

More than a few people are comparing this nature docuseries to Succession, HBO's drama about simians fighting for power with other family members. Oscar-winning director James Reed (My Octopus Teacher) tracks two rival clans of chimpanzees in the forests of Uganda and discovers a rich and complex social hierarchy, highlighted by the struggle of one generation of apes waiting for the aging alpha to cede power. Add Mahershala Ali's smooth narration, and this four-episode miniseries is a fascinating watch. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Beef

For fans of: Channeling anger into dark humor, Burger King chicken sandwiches (from that good Burger King you have to drive 90 minutes to)
Number of seasons: 1

Steven Yeun, Beef

Steven Yeun, Beef

Netflix

This meaty dark comedy stars Steven Yeun as a troubled contractor and Ali Wong as a seemingly-has-it-all entrepreneur whose lives collide when they get into a road range incident. Each determined not to let the other get the upper hand, they embark on a battle of wills as their personal lives crumble around them. Yeun is fantastic in this, and the endless parade of unfortunate circumstances that force both of them into their laser-eyed focus on destroying each other is a nice bit of schadenfreude. Who knew hate could be so fun? This is in the conversation of the best Netflix originals ever. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Emergency: NYC

For fans of: Medical dramas but REAL, frontline workers, drone shots of New York City
Number of seasons: 1

Emergency NYC

Emergency NYC

Netflix

A spiritual successor to the 2020 medical docuseries Lenox Hill, Emergency: NYC is a deeply personal look at frontline medical workers in New York City as they deal with the pressures of their job and personal lives. Set during the middle of the COVID pandemic, Emergency: NYC sees the doctors, nurses, and EMTs confront a new wave of patients who either neglected issues or were refused help due to overcrowding at hospitals. It's unflinching in its access, leading to moments of overwhelming joy... and devastating tragedy. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

The Night Agent

For fans of: Shawn Ryan shows, political conspiracies
Number of seasons: 1

Gabriel Basso, The Night Agent

Gabriel Basso, The Night Agent

Dan Power, Netflix

TV creator Shawn Ryan has produced some great shows — The Shield, Timeless, Terriers — and while his latest, The Night Agent, might not be on the same level of his other hits, it's an easy binge that stays in Ryan's lane. The political action-thriller is based on Matthew Quirk's book, following a low-level FBI agent who mans a secret phone line in the basement of the White House. His job is a bore... until the phone rings! Then it's all about uncovering a conspiracy that goes — say it with me — all the way to the top. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Outlast

For fans of: Alone, reality drama, watching people suffer
Number of seasons: 1

Justin Court, Outlast

Justin Court, Outlast

Netflix

This survival competition drops 16 competitors into the Alaskan wilderness with little more than their wits, just like History Channel's series Alone, except it makes these self-proclaimed lone wolves work as a team. You know what that means: drama! And there's plenty of it in the first season's eight episodes, as teams find that the biggest threat to cashing the $1 million prize is a team that throws morality out the window. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Outer Banks

For fans of: Treasure huntin' teens, keeping up with what's popular with the kids
Number of seasons: 3

Madelyn Cline, Chase Stokes, Carlacia Grant, Jonathan Daviss, Outer Banks

Madelyn Cline, Chase Stokes, Carlacia Grant, Jonathan Daviss, Outer Banks

Netflix

At this point, the Outer Banks isn't so much a place as it is a state of mind. In Season 3, Outer Banks is taking the action to the Caribbean — and beyond — as the Pogues are pulled into a dangerous hunt for a lost city. Season 2's massive reveal about John B.'s (Chase Stokes) family leads into the new season, which was released in the dead of winter despite the previous seasons getting released in a warmer time of year. Being a summer show is also a state of mind. –Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

You

For fans of: Creepy dudes, voiceover, problem after problem
Number of seasons: 4

Penn Badgley, You

Penn Badgley, You

Netflix

Joe Goldberg (Penn Badgely) is back for the fourth season of Netflix's creepy stalker drama, except this time the stalker may be the stalkee! The New York murderer turned L.A. murderer is taking his questionable talents to Europe, where he'll be masquerading as a professor, keeping tabs on his librarian crush (Tati Gabrielle), getting texts from a stalker, and palling around with privileged jerks. You can take the guy out of Gossip Girl, but you can't take Gossip Girl out of the guy, am I right? -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

Cunk on Earth

For fans of: Ali G., f---ing with history, Technotronic's "Pump Up the Jam"
Number of seasons: 1

Diane Morgan, Cunk on Earth

Diane Morgan, Cunk on Earth

Jonathan Browning

Black Mirror's Charlie Brooker co-created this spoof of BBC documentaries that looks at the entire history of human civilization through dunderheaded host Philomena Cunk, whose grasp of history is equal to that of one who has suffered several massive head injuries. Borrowing from British icon Ali G., Cunk (played to perfection by comedian Diane Morgan), interviews experts in history with the stupidest questions you've ever heard, and it's funny every time. It's so dumb it's brilliant. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Sky Rojo

For fans of: Titillating gaudiness, badass women fighting drug dealers, Álex Pina
Number of seasons: 3

Yany Prado, Lali Espósito, and Verónica Sánchez, Sky Rojo

Yany Prado, Lali Espósito, and Verónica Sánchez, Sky Rojo

Tamara Arranz/Netflix

The success of Álex Pina's Money Heist has given him free rein to deliver his stylish sense of violence, crime, and sex in other projects, and Sky Rojo is Pina at full blast. The Spanish series follows a trio of sex workers in the Canary Islands on the run from their pimp, using everything at their disposal to stay away from his clutches. It's action-forward pulp fun, but it does spend lots of time developing these women into more interesting characters than you'd expect given its compact run times (usually 30 minutes or less per episode). It's not for everyone, but it's really for the people it's for. Season 3 was released in January 2023. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Vikings: Valhalla

For fans of: Pillaging, plundering, family drama
Number of seasons: 2

Frida Gustavsson, Leo Suter, Vikings: Valhalla

Frida Gustavsson, Leo Suter, Vikings: Valhalla

Bernard Walsh/Netflix

The Norsemen and Norsewomen of Vikings, History's cult favorite action-packed historical drama, have rowed their way to Netflix for Vikings: Valhalla, a sequel series that covers the next epoch of the Viking reign. Valhalla has a new cast and is set a century after the original show, and follows Leif Erikson's (Sam Corlett) journey as he becomes the first European to set foot on North America alongside his sister Freydis (Frida Gustavsson), as well as Harald Hardrada (Leo Suter), who tried and failed to claim the English throne. So yes, this show is building toward the end of the Viking age. If you liked the clanging swords and sexy bearded warriors of the original Vikings, you'll definitely want to check this out, because it's more of that. -Liam Mathews [Trailer

Ginny & Georgia

For fans of: High school dramas, murder dramas, and relationship dramas all in one
Number of seasons: 2

Antonia Gentry and Brianne Howey, Ginny & Georgia

Antonia Gentry and Brianne Howey, Ginny & Georgia

Netflix

Is it a high school drama? Is it a romantic comedy? Is it a murder mystery? Why not all of those at once? One of the rare algorithm-friendly shows that work, Ginny & Georgia returns for Season 2 a little less Gilmore Girls and a little more Mommie Dearest as Ginny (Antonia Gentry) becomes wiser to her mom Georgia's (Brianne Howey) potentially murderous past ways. But the playful romantic issues and teen drama are still there, the strong performances from Gentry and Howey elevate the material, and the closing walls add a bit of urgency to everything. It's not Netflix's best show, but it's the best of its ilk. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Alice in Borderland

For fans of: Squid Game, manga, puzzles that kill you if you don't solve them
Number of seasons: 2

Tao Tsuchiya and Kento Yamazaki, Alice in Borderland

Tao Tsuchiya and Kento Yamazaki, Alice in Borderland 

Kumiko Tsuchiya/Netflix

Alice in Borderland, adapted from the manga series of the same name, follows Arisu (Kento Yamazaki) as he suddenly finds himself in an alternate Tokyo where most humans have disappeared. He has no idea what happened, but must enter the mysterious competitions in order to earn "visas" that will prevent him from being executed. Along the way, he crosses paths with Usagi (Tao Tsuchiya), a rock climber who becomes Arisu's partner in figuring out what is going on. -Kat Moon [Trailer]

Emily in Paris

For fans of: Stereotypes, "fashion," rom-coms, brand engagement
Number of seasons: 3 (Renewed through Season 4)

Lily Collins, Emily in Paris

Lily Collins, Emily in Paris

Stéphanie Branchu/Netflix

Emily in Paris (and you gotta say it like it rhymes), who haunts the dreams of actual Parisians, is back on the streets of Paris like some kind of colorfully dressed cryptid. Netflix's biggest original comedy isn't its best show, but it is undeniably distinctive and addictive, thanks to Lily Collins' entertaining performance and creator Darren Star's knack for froth he first nailed on Sex and the City. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Last Chance U Last Chance U: Basketball

For fans of: Inspiring sports stories
Number of seasons: 5 seasons of Last Chance U and 2 seasons of Last Chance U: Basketball

Last Chance U

Last Chance U

Netflix

One of TV's best sports docuseries, every season of Last Chance U follows a different junior college football program across the U.S. It focuses on the students -- many of whom are highly touted as players, but deal with challenges on and off the field -- as they attempt to keep up their performance both on the team and in the classroom in order to remain eligible. The show gives unique access to the host of issues student athletes face, and goes deep into the ambition many of the players have to move into Division 1 football programs. Its spinoff, Last Chance U: Basketball, is just as good, with its first season spotlighting the East Los Angeles College Huskies as they try to turn their fortunes around with a roster made up of kids who failed to live up to expectations at higher division programs because of various factors. The sport is different, but the emotional impact remains the same as their coach pushes them to be the best players and people they can be. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

Wednesday 

For fans of: Supernatural teen dramas, Tim Burton, goths
Number of seasons: 1 (Renewed for Season 2)

Jenna Ortega, Wednesday

Jenna Ortega, Wednesday

Netflix

Was it the right call to turn The Addams Family into a boilerplate Netflix show about a girl at a supernatural school investigating a not-very-intriguing murder mystery and navigating some not-very-original high school drama? Probably not. This show didn't have to be a Chilling Adventures of Sabrina redux. But Jenna Ortega's winningly droll performance as the iconic morbid teen Wednesday Addams and director/executive producer Tim Burton's distinctive brand of macabre whimsy make it entertaining enough to watch if you're not expecting something spectacular. -Liam Mathews [Trailer | Review]

Dead to Me

For fans of: Secrets, murder, seriously ride-or-die friendships
Number of seasons: 3

Christina Applegate and Linda Cardellini, Dead to Me

Christina Applegate and Linda Cardellini, Dead to Me

Saeed Adyani/Netflix

This dark comedy is one of Netflix's best-written shows, and its snappy dialogue sounds like music when delivered by the talented duo of Christina Applegate and Linda Cardellini, who have both been nominated for Emmys for their performances. Applegate plays Jen, a woman grieving the death of her husband in a hit-and-run, and Cardellini plays Judy, who unbeknownst to Jen is responsible for her husband's death. They become friends in a grief support group, and the twists and secrets just keep piling up from there. It's wickedly funny and always surprising. Its recently released third season is its last. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]

1899

For fans of: Puzzle boxes, being seasick
Number of seasons: 1

Aneurin Barnard, Emily Beecham, Andreas Pietschmann, 1899

Aneurin Barnard, Emily Beecham, Andreas Pietschmann, 1899

Netflix

This isn't a prequel to Yellowstone, it's an expensive but efficiently made supernatural mystery series set onboard a steamship carrying migrants from London to New York City. After the ship makes contact with another seemingly lost ship at sea, things get really weird. A "What is even happening?" type of weird. The show features a sprawling international cast meant to give it global appeal — you'll hear eight different languages spoken — with Into the BadlandsEmily Beechum the top-billed performer. Its country of origin is Germany, and it was created by Dark's Jantje Friese and Baran bo Odar, masters of ambitious, narratively complex TV. It features a haunting score from composer Ben Frost that's so good you may want to listen to on its own. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]

The Crown

For fans of: The royals, revenge dresses
Number of seasons: 5 (Renewed for sixth and final season)

Dominic West and Elizabeth Debicki, The Crown

Dominic West and Elizabeth Debicki, The Crown

Keith Bernstein/Netflix

The acclaimed dramatization of the life of Queen Elizabeth II is now in its second-to-last season, set in the 1990s as Prince Charles (Dominic West) and Princess Diana (Elizabeth Debicki) divorce. Season 5 finds Imelda Staunton taking over the role of Her Majesty from Olivia Colman. It's not as good as the fourth season, which dominated the Emmys in 2021, but it's still one of Netflix's best shows, and the only one left that's a viable contender for the Outstanding Drama Series Emmy. -Liam Mathews [Trailer | Review]  

Cyberpunk: Edgerunners

For fans of: Cyberpunk 2077, Love Death + Robots
Number of seasons: 1

Cyberpunk: Edgerunners

Cyberpunk: Edgerunners

Netflix

This eye-popping anime from renowned Japanese anime makers Studio Trigger is based in the dystopian, cyberpunk future of the video game Cyberpunk 2077, a setting rich in detail and possibility that Edgerunners uses to its fullest. Our hero is David Martinez, a young man who, after he's struck with tragedy, drops out of high school and into a life of cyber-enhanced criminality. There's violence, nudity, and cursing, so keep the kiddos away, and it's a deep, jargony dive into tech, so keep the normies away, too. But if Blade Runner-style drama is of interest to you, jack in. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Cobra Kai

For fans of: The Karate Kid, the '80s, the Valley
Number of seasons: 5 (renewed for Season 6)

Sean Kanan, Cobra Kai

Sean Kanan, Cobra Kai

Curtis Bonds Baker/Netflix

It's hard to believe that a series following the lives of Johnny (William Zabka) and Daniel (Ralph Macchio) from The Karate Kid would be as good as Cobra Kai is, but there's some sort of indescribable magic going on that makes it work. Following up on Johnny in the present day, Cobra Kai wonders what would happen if his rivalry with Daniel continued into their adult lives, culminating in them creating their own karate dojos where a new generation of martial artists fight for respect, rumble with their parents, and get into love triangles. The show's self-awareness holds everything together, but it's the twisting (albeit predictable) plot that makes it so bingeable. In Season 5, a foe from Daniel's past reemerges: "Karate's Bad Boy" Mike Barnes (Sean Kanan), who fought Daniel in The Karate Kid Part III. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Bee and Puppycat

For fans of: Rilakkuma and Kaoru, Steven Universe
Number of seasons: 2

Bee and Puppycat

Bee and Puppycat

Netflix

This animated series may sound familiar; it dates all the way back to 2013, when it was a digital short by Adventure Time's Natasha Allegri, but it gets new life on Netflix with do-overs of the short first season and a new second season. The charming series follows an unemployed twentysomething woman who goes on adventures with Puppycat — a creature that is exactly what it sounds like (but seems more cat if we're being honest) — mixing fantastical temp-jobs in space with more mundane down-to-Earth problems. It's good for both kids and grown-ups, but should really resonate with those fresh out of high school or college and wondering what their next step in life should be. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Mo

For fans of: Ramy, finding humor in the immigrant experience
Number of seasons: 1 (Renewed for Season 2)

Mo Amer, Mo

Mo Amer, Mo

Netflix

Ramy fans don't need an introduction to comedian Mo Amer, and they probably won't need any introduction to Mo, either. But for everyone else (is there anyone else?), here's the scoop: The new Netflix comedy, created by Amer and Ramy Youssef and produced by A24, stars Amer as Mo Najjar, a Palestinian refugee living in Houston with his family and hustling to support them. If you like Ramy, you'll like this, and if you don't like Ramy, you haven't watched it. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]

Extraordinary Attorney Woo

For fans of: Legal dramas, wholesome romance
Number of seasons: 1 (Renewed for Season 2)

Park Eun-bin, Extraordinary Attorney Woo

Park Eun-bin, Extraordinary Attorney Woo

Netflix

No matter how familiar you are with K-dramas — from the scale of I-Watched-Squid-Game-in-English to chronic Second Lead Syndrome sufferer — Extraordinary Attorney Woo is a must-seePark Eun-bin stars as Woo Young-woo, an attorney with autism in Korea. Every episode features a different legal case, and Young-woo flexes her out-of-the-box thinking and high IQ of 164 to represent her clients in the best way possible. The series offers commentary on subjects ranging from patriarchal societies to Korea's education system, and doesn't shy away from heavy topics including domestic violence and sexual assault. And yet, Extraordinary Attorney Woo is not a somber drama. Woo Young-woo's endearing personality and the heartwarming relationships she builds — including a romantic one with the law firm's Mr. Popular Lee Junho (Kang Tae-oh) — make the show an uplifting watch. For more on the show, check out our interview with star Park-Kat Moon [Trailer]

The Sandman 

For fans of: Epic fantasy, Neil Gaiman's whole thing
Number of seasons: 1 (Renewed for Season 2)

Tom Sturridge, The Sandman

Tom Sturridge, The Sandman

Liam Daniel/Netflix

When I say this blockbuster fantasy series is long-awaited, I mean it. An adaptation of Neil Gaiman's beloved comic series has been in development on and off since 1996. And it's honestly a good thing that it didn't get made into a movie back then, because TV is a much better format for a story this sprawling. It follows Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams (Tom Sturridge), as he breaks free from a century of human captivity and sets out to restore himself as the ruler of dreamworld. It's a fantasy-superhero epic that features Game of ThronesGwendoline Christie as Lucifer Morningstar, who is technically the same character as Tom Ellis' Lucifer Morningstar from Lucifer (the shows share source material), just a drastically different interpretation. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]  

Trainwreck: Woodstock '99

For fans of: The '90s, cultural documentaries, Korn 
Number of seasons: 1

Trainwreck: Woodstock '99

Trainwreck: Woodstock '99

Netflix

This docuseries is all about the he-said-she-said bulls--t. It explores the debacle of Woodstock '99, the music festival marred by violence, depravity, and Limp Bizkit. Last year's HBO documentary Woodstock 99: Peace, Love, and Rage beat Trainwreck to the punch, but with three episodes, this one gets even deeper into how out of control it got. It's an intense you-are-there look at things falling apart. -Liam Mathews [Trailer | Review]

Virgin River

For fans of: Hallmarkian romance, heartwarming tearjerkers
Number of seasons: 5 (Renewed for Season 6)

Alexandra Breckenridge and Martin Henderson, Virgin River

Alexandra Breckenridge and Martin Henderson, Virgin River

Netflix

Do you like it your TV to feel like one long Hallmark movie? If that's the case, you should know that few other shows are currently doing that better than Virgin River. In this adaptation of the novels by Robyn Carr, Alexandra Breckenridge stars as Mel, a nurse practitioner from Los Angeles who, after having her heart broken one too many times, starts a new life in a remote Northern California town. As these things go, she quickly meets Jack (Martin Henderson), a bartender who makes her want to love again. This show really has everything: long lost twin brothers, bombshell pregnancies where it's a mystery who the father is, and main characters getting shot by mysterious gunmen. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

Stranger Things

For fans of: Long mother-effin' episodes, being part of pop culture
Number of seasons: 4 (Renewed for fifth and final season)

Millie Bobby Brown, Stranger Things

Millie Bobby Brown, Stranger Things

Netflix

Stranger Things is Netflix's biggest show, and probably the biggest show on television right now. Just go to your local Hot Topic or ask your local tween for the lyrics to "Runnin' Up That Hill" for proof. Season 4 is out in its entirety after being divvied up into two lengthy parts and setting streaming records, adding a new villain, new characters, and new locations. But you're here to hang out with your old friends, like Steve. You rule, Steve! -Tim Surette [ReviewTrailer]

The Umbrella Academy

For fans of: Young people with superpowers, Gerard Way 
Number of seasons: 3 (Renewed for Season 4)

Justin H. Min, The Umbrella Academy

Justin H. Min, The Umbrella Academy

Christos Kalohoridis/Netflix

Season 2 of The Umbrella Academy left off on a major cliffhanger when the gang time-traveled from the '60s back to an alternate version of 2019 in which Hargreeves (Colm Feore) had trained seven different superpowered babies into becoming the Sparrow Academy. In Season 3, the series is picking up right where it left off, and the Umbrellas will have to deal with the apocalyptic event potentially caused by their timeline jumping. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

Peaky Blinders

For fans of: That haircut, period piece crime dramas 
Number of seasons: 6

Cillian Murphy, Peaky Blinders

Cillian Murphy, Peaky Blinders

Netflix

Peaky Blinders is one of the defining shows of the era when Netflix was ascendant — its first season came out the same year as House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black — and now it's over. The sixth and final season of the Netfflix/BBC collaboration is now streaming, alongside the previous five seasons. It's a stylish crime drama starring Cillian Murphy as antihero Tommy Shelby, the leader of the titular gang consisting of his relatives, as they rise to the top of the criminal underworld in interwar Birmingham. The costumes are glamorous, the anachronistic PJ Harvey-heavy soundtrack is cool, and the supporting performances from big stars like Tom Hardy and Anya Taylor-Joy are entertaining. If you never got around to Peaky Blinders, there's no reason to not start now. -Liam Mathews [Trailer

Keep Sweet: Pray and Obey

For fans of: Documentaries about cults, Hulu's Under the Banner of Heaven
Number of seasons: 1

Keep Sweet: Pray and Obey

Keep Sweet: Pray and Obey

Netflix

This four-part docuseries tells the story of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and its polygamist leader and self-professed prophet, Warren Jeffs, who had his flock of believers under his thumb in the early 2000s. Jeffs controlled the women in his sect, used them as currency, chose who they married (even when they were as young as 14), banished threats to his rule, and lived a lavish lifestyle paid for by the businesses he took over in the name of the church. With harrowing first-person accounts from the victims of Jeffs' mental and sexual abuse, Keep Sweet will send chills down your spine. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Borgen

For fans of: The West Wing, foreign excellence
Number of seasons: 4

Borgen: Power and Glory

Borgen: Power and Glory

Mike Kollöffel / Netflix

You like The West Wing? Then you'll like this Danish political thriller, which is considered to be one of the first international shows at the level of the best dramas of Peak TV. It follows the unlikely rise of centrist politician Birgitte Nyborg Christensen (Sidse Babett Knudsen) to prime minister of Denmark. The new fourth season, a Netflix original, comes out nine years after Season 3 and focuses on a geopolitical crisis in Greenland. It's more fun than it sounds. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

All American

For fans of: Sports, high school, the city of Los Angeles
Number of seasons: 5

All American

Daniel Ezra, All American

The CW

The very popular CW high school sports drama, which was inspired by former NFL player Spencer Paysinger's life, follows Spencer James (Daniel Ezra), an aspiring football star balancing ambition and everyday teenage drama as he moves from his neighborhood to become MVP at a new school in Beverly Hills. Its fourth season hit Netflix in May. -Allison Picurro [Trailer | More shows like All American]

Outlander

For fans of: Sex, time travel, history
Number of seasons: 6 (5 on Netflix)

Caitriona Balfe and Sam Heughan, Outlander

Caitriona Balfe and Sam Heughan, Outlander

Starz

Depending on who you ask, Outlander is either the sexiest show on TV, or it's a historical drama with a touch of sci-fi. Or maybe it's both! Based on the book series by Diana Gabaldon, Outlander revolves around Claire (Caitriona Balfe), a married World War II nurse who, during a trip with her husband (Tobias Menzies), mysteriously time travels back to 1743. Thrown into the past and desperate to get home, Claire finds herself embroiled in a Scottish uprising while slowly but surely falling in love with a young warrior named Jamie Fraser (Sam Heughan). If you're looking for something that will give you an occasionally accurate history lesson and get you invested in a sweeping romance that spans centuries, Outlander is the show for you. The show is currently between its sixth and seventh seasons on Starz, but Season 5 was only recently added to Netflix. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

Ozark 

For fans of: Crime thrillers, saying "Oh s---!" at something shocking at least once an episode, the color blue
Number of seasons: 4

Jason Bateman, Ozark

Jason Bateman, Ozark

Netflix

This is it. WIll Mardy Byrde (Jason Bateman) die? Will Wendy Byrde (Laura Linney) die? Will Ruth (Julia Garner) die? Will Charlotte (Sofia Hublitz) die? Will Jonah (Skylar Gaertner) write algorithms to make him the leader of the next generation of money laundering professionals and then get caught and thrown in while collar prison? That's all anyone wants to know as Ozark comes to a close after four seasons. With the bad guys closing in, all we know is someone is going to die. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Grace and Frankie

For fans of: Classic sitcom feels, female friendships, odd couples
Number of seasons: 7

Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, Grace and Frankie

Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, Grace and Frankie

Melissa Moseley/Netflix

Netflix's longest-running original (it premiered in 2015 and is ending with 94 episodes, more than any other scripted Netflix series), Grace and Frankie follows the two titular women, played by Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, as they embark on new lives when their husbands come out as gay and partner up together. There's an Odd Couple vibe as Grace (Fonda) is a no-nonsense cosmetics mogul and Frankie (Tomlin) is a hippie artist, which only cements their friendship beyond the sitcom-setup bond. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Russian Doll

For fans of: Time loops, time travel, Natasha Lyonne
Number of seasons: 2

Natasha Lyonne, Russian Doll

Natasha Lyonne, Russian Doll

Netflix

The best show of early 2019 is back for a second season. Season 1 ended so perfectly and with such finality that it would have been a great limited series, but co-creator-star Natasha Lyonne had an idea for more. Season 2 is set four years after Manhattanites Nadia (Lyonne) and Alan (Charlie Barnett) escaped from their death-loop, and now they're on a new sci-fi sadcom adventure where they encounter a time portal accessible via the 6 train that leads to a fate even worse than endless death: becoming your own mother. Season 2 doesn't have the freshness of Season 1, but it's still as fun as a comedy about generational trauma can be. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]

Top Boy

For fans of: UK hip-hop music and culture, narco-dramas
Number of seasons: 3 on Netflix, 4 total

Ashley Walters, Top Boy

Ashley Walters, Top Boy

Chris Harris

This East London and Jamaica-set crime drama returns for its fourth season in 11 years (they make TV at a different pace across the pond) and first since 2019. This season, crime boss Dushane (Ashley Walters) is trying to keep a tight hold on his empire, which includes making Jamie (Micheal Ward), who once came gunning for him, work for him. Meanwhile, Dushane's former partner Sully (Kane Robinson) is trying to get out of the game, but it's not easy, especially with the trouble his young relative Pebbles (The Falcon and the Winter Soldier star Erin Kellyman) brings his way when she comes to him for help. Top Boy is a gritty and engrossing crime thriller, and it's great that it's back. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]

Cheer

For fans of: Sports docuseries, watching the human body do unreal things, facing controversy head-on
Number of seasons: 2

Cheer

Cheer

Netflix

Producer Greg Whiteley is one of TV's Midases, a man whose golden touch makes hits out of any sports docuseries he creates (see: Last Chance U, Last Chance U: Basketball). But Cheer, which follows college cheerleading powerhouse Navarro College, might be his best. Following a Season 1 that won three Emmys, Cheer returns for Season 2 with its world upside-down and dealing with celebrity, both the good and bad. Season 2 also deals with controversy — Season 1 star Jerry Harris was charged with sexual abuse of a minor and child pornography — head-on, in addition to coronavirus and the brutal winter storms that hit Texas last winter. But the heart of the season is still the competition, which is magnified as cameras also follow Navarro's rivals Trinity Valley and the collision course of both teams in Daytona. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Money Heist

For fans of: Snappy shows that were meant for bingeing, twisty action, antiheroes
Number of Seasons: 3

Jaime Lorente, Belen Cuesta, and Ursula Corbero, Money Heist

Jaime Lorente, Belen Cuesta, and Ursula Corbero, Money Heist

Tamara Arranz/Netflix

Netflix recently announced that 97 percent of its American subscribers have watched an international (non-English language) series on its service, and I'm willing to bet 97 percent of those people were watching Money Heist, Álex Pina's Spanish bank heist series. Pina's preference for style and mystery over everything else is all over Money Heist, making it highly bingeable and perfect for the Netflix formula. Action! Drama! Skin! More action! The complete series is out now. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Arcane

For fans of: League of Legends (or not, it doesn't matter!), dope animation
Number of seasons: 1 (Renewed for Season 2)

Arcane

Arcane

Netflix

The popular PC video game League of Legends has officially crossed mediums. Arcane adds life to two the game's playable characters, Jinx (voiced by Ella Purnell) and Vi (voiced by Hailee Steinfeld), by digging into their backstories as petty thieves in the underworld city of Zaun and the tech-heavy city above it, Piltover. Arcane could have taken the easy route and thrown out a cookie-cutter TV adaptation with empty characters and showy action sequences, but instead it has crafted a show with great characters, a deep story, and beautiful motion-capture animation that pops off the screen. You don't need to know a thing about League of Legends or be a fan of anime to enjoy this. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

Narcos: Mexico

For fans of: Crime dramas, cartel violence, drugs
Number of seasons: 3

Scoot McNairy and Eric Etebari, Narcos: Mexico

Scoot McNairy and Eric Etebari, Narcos: Mexico

Juan Rosas/Netflix

The third and final season of the spin-off that we didn't know we needed continues on without its big bad Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo (Diego Luna) after his arrest in the Season 2 finale, but that just means there's more chaos to be had in the ruckus to become the new Mexican drug kingpin. Expect lots of violence, obviously. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

The Baby-Sitters Club

For fans of: Warmth and wholesomeness, tween girl drama
Number of seasons: 2

Vivian Watson and Anais Lee, The Baby-Sitters Club

Vivian Watson and Anais Lee, The Baby-Sitters Club

Netflix

There's a tween girl inside all of us who just wants to watch a charming show about young girls trying to start a baby-sitting business. Embrace your inner Emily or Jayden or Madison and watch The Baby-Sitters Club, a true safe space in a world that wants to keep you down. Season 2 adds a few more members to the club, but the care to flesh out all its characters is still there. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Maid

For fans of: The struggle, female empowerment, making bad decisions and then good decisions, the Pacific Northwest
Number of seasons: 1

Margaret Qualley, Maid

Margaret Qualley, Maid

Ricardo Hubbs/Netflix

You won't often end an episode of Maid -- adapted from Stephanie Land's memoir Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay and a Mother's Will to Survive -- feeling overjoyed with the world, because the miniseries isn't afraid to focus on the difficulties single mothers escaping abusive relationships face. But stick around and you'll be inspired by the perseverance of Alex (Margaret Qualley in a star-making performance) as she becomes a housecleaner in Washington to make ends barely meet. Even though it's a little longer than it needs to be, you won't complain as long as Qualley is on the screen. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Squid Game

For fans of: Twisted tales of cruelty, extremely violent kids' games
Number of seasons: 1 (Renewed for Season 2)

Squid Game

Squid Game

Youngkyu Park/Netflix

Who remembers playing childhood games for fun on the playground? Who remembers playing them FOR YOUR LIFE? The unexpected hit Korean drama Squid Game is more the latter, as a group of people in bad need of money are taken in by a secret organization that has them play games -- like Red Light, Green Light -- for money. The catch? They lose, they die. Violently. What separates this from something like Saw is the humanity given to the characters. You'll care about some of these people... and then they will die. –Tim Surette [Trailer | More shows like Squid Game]

High on the Hog: How African American Culture Transformed America

For fans of: Getting a history lesson while your stomach growls
Number of seasons: 2                                                                                                               

Stephen Satterfield and Dr. Jessica B. Harris, High on the Hog: How African American Culture Transformed America

Stephen Satterfield and Dr. Jessica B. Harris, High on the Hog: How African American Culture Transformed America

Netflix

Netflix has a large catalog of food shows, but none quite like High on the Hog. Hosted by Stephen Satterfield, the four-part docuseries is about Satterfield's journey to learn about the storied history of African American cuisine. He learns about the contributions Black people have made to food, and how much of an influence food from the past has on the food we eat now, including the origins of okra, dishes created by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington's enslaved chefs, and how mac and cheese came to be. The show is infectiously joyful, and has a lovely "discover your roots" spirit. Fair warning, though: You're going to be starving after each episode.  -Allison Picurro [Trailer]

Black Summer

For fans of: Intense no-cut actions sequences, life and death situations
Number of seasons: 2

Christine Lee, Jaime King, and Justin Chu Gary, Black Summer

Christine Lee, Jaime King, and Justin Chu Gary, Black Summer

Netflix

Not all zombie shows are built the same, and this spiritual spin-off of the goofy Z Nation focuses on the gritty life-or-death situation of a small group of people trying to survive a zombie apocalypse. It's intentionally minimal on plot (and at times dialogue), letting the action -- frequently told in long takes with no cuts and some athletic cameramen -- tell the story. For my money, it's the best zombie show on TV. -Tim Surette [Trailer]

Breaking Bad

For fans of: Great TV, great acting, great cinematography, great writing, great everything
Number of seasons: 5

Bryan Cranston and Giancarlo Esposito, Breaking Bad

Bryan Cranston and Giancarlo Esposito, Breaking Bad

Ursula Coyote/AMC

Well, it's perhaps the greatest television show ever made, so yeah, you should watch it. Bryan Cranston stars as antihero Walter White, a mild-mannered high school chemistry teacher who begins cooking meth to pay for his cancer treatments and finds that he really, really likes it. It won 16 Primetime Emmy Awards, including two for Best Drama Series in 2013 and 2014. Some will say the first season is only OK, but those people are morons. While you're at it, watch the spin-off, Better Call Saul, which is also on Netflix. –Tim Surette [Trailer]

Master of None

For fans of: When comedians enter their serious auteur era
Number of seasons: 3

Lena Waithe and Naomi Ackie, Master of None

Lena Waithe and Naomi Ackie, Master of None

Netflix

When Master of None first premiered in 2015, the series became a reset for co-creator and star Aziz Ansari's career, who up until that point had mostly been known for his role as the guy on Parks and Recreation who gave us "treat yo' self." Ansari played Dev, a New York actor struggling with the personal and the professional, and the show was pretty universally acclaimed, especially in its triumphant second season, which brought black-and-white cinematography, references to French New Wave, and a beautiful, Golden Globe-winning episode about Dev's friend Denise's (Lena Waithe) coming out. It was in between Season 2 and its surprise Season 3 that sexual misconduct allegations against Ansari were made public, and when the show eventually did return after a long hiatus, it shifted the focus from Dev to Denise, exploring her relationship with her wife Alicia (Naomi Ackie). The good news is that it stayed fascinating throughout, wrestling with the characters' flaws and exploring regret and loss in an entirely human way. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]