If you're thinking, "As if! Clueless could never come back." Well, think again.

CBS TV Studios is contemplating a reboot of the 1995 hit movie, Deadline reports. However, this version would be an hour-long drama that would focus instead on the character Dionne (played by Stacey Dash in the movie and the 1996 TV spin-off).

The new and edgier Clueless -- which will either be iconic or burn down entire genres — is being considered by The CW and a few streaming services and comes from Jordan Reddout and Gus Hickey. The two are best known for reboots of NBC's Will & Grace and ABC's The Muppets, as well as their work on Freeform's grown-ish.

Described as "Mean Girls meets Riverdale meets a Lizzo music video," the reimagined Clueless would still take place in high school and examine what would happen if Cher were to go missing and Dionne stepped up from sidekick to main chick in 2020 Los Angeles. Dionne would also channel her inner Veronica Mars and solve the mystery of her missing bestie while basking in a whole new world of popularity. Other descriptors being batted around to envision the show include "baby pink," "bisexual", "blue-tinted," "tiny sunglasses-wearing," "oat milk latté," — and our personal favorite — "Adderall-fueled."

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Corinne Brinkerhoff (American Gothic) is slated to executive-produce the new Clueless alongside her development executive Tiffany Grant. The project would be a part of Brinkerhoff's CBS TV Studios overall deal. Robert Lawrence, a producer on the Clueless movie, will also lend his expertise.

As fans of the movie may recall, Amy Heckerling wrote and directed the original Clueless film, which was a reimagining of Jane Austen's Emma with Beverly Hills teen dream Cher Horowitz (played by Alicia Silverstone in the movie and Rachel Blanchard on the show) leading the charge. Arguably one of the best teen movies of all time, Clueless made us fall in love with Cher, her clothes, hair, friends and enviable conveyor-belt closet as she deftly navigated high school politics and self-awareness in the 1990s.

The TV adaptation did much of same. CBS TV Studios owns the TV rights to Clueless, and its predecessor, Paramount Network Television, ushered in the three-season spinoff. The latter came to an end in 1999.

<em>Clueless</em>Clueless