Looking for something to watch on TV, Netflix, HBO, or any of the other options out there? We've got suggestions for you.

Each week, we'll poll the office to see what everyone's been watching and pass those recommendations along. It could be something that's the talk of the town, a show that isn't even out yet, a classic that we've fallen back to, or just something we watched on our phone.

If you're looking for even more recommendations, head over to our Watch This Now! page, where we'll regularly update our running list of all the best stuff on TV that you should be watching.

<p>Ricky Whittle and Ian McShane, <em>American Gods</em> </p>

Ricky Whittle and Ian McShane, American Gods


American Gods
I'm catching up on American Gods ahead of the Starz fantasy drama's New York Comic Con panel later this week. Season 2 is a troubled production, which is a shame, because Season 1 had some really good stuff in it, especially its surreal standalone vignettes about the secret history of pagan gods coming to America. Word on the street is that the producers are trying to make Season 2 less weird, which is a shame. But I do understand the reluctance to spend HBO money on a highfalutin Adult Swim show. - Liam Mathews, Staff Editor

Grand Designs / The World's Most Extraordinary Homes
The past week or so felt as though we were all living on the Hellmouth, so I sought refuge in the sweet escape of real estate shows available on Netflix. The World's Most Extraordinary Homes is pure comfort, as charming British hosts banter and show off exquisite houses I can't even fathom living in. But when I want my home shows without a side of crippling jealousy, I turn to Grand Designs, which spotlights a different person in each episode who sets out to build their ambitious dream home — a journey which often destroys their budget and threatens their marriage, too. Together, the two shows are a perfect yin and yang, and bouncing between them has helped keep my Extraordinary Homes­-inspired sense of inferiority and Grand Designs-inspired sense of superiority in perfect balance. - Sadie Gennis, Senior Editor

A Million Little Things
I was dubious about the This Is Us-ness of the premiere of ABC's new tearjerker A Million Little Things, especially with the time jumping and the twist-at-the-end format, but critics were able to watch the next two episodes and the show really starts to find its own rhythm very quickly. The third episode demonstrates what this show is capable of and was genuinely emotional without feeling like you were being manipulated into it. So for anyone out there who wasn't fully on board after the first episode, this one is worth keeping an eye on because it grows on you very quickly. Also, Grace Park is a queen. - Megan Vick, Associate Editor

A Million Little Things Boss Reveals What to Expect After That Devastating Final Twist

The Deuce
In its second season, The Deuce loses some of the novelty that made its exploration of the seedy section of Times Square so alluringly naughty, but what it loses in newness it gains in a deeper and more powerful story. Whereas Season 1 focused on the sex trade in the early 1970s and earned Maggie Gyllenhaal a Golden Globe nomination for her no-holds-barred turn as the business-minded prostitute Candy, Season 2 flashes forward to focus on the now burgeoning porn world in 1977 — a world that's given Candy more agency over her body and mind now that she's a producer and director. As tawdry as this could be, The Deuce treats the porn business — and the women in it — with dignity, respect and unflinching scrutiny of the way it dehumanizes (and sometimes empowers) its workers. Also intriguing is the story following the emergence of gay porn, gay bars and gay life in general in this era — a sort of prequel to the panic soon to set in as AIDS wreaks havoc on the city. - Malcolm Venable, Senior Editor

Looking for more recommendations? Click on over to our Watch This Now! page for hand-picked suggestions of what shows you should watch next.