D.L. Hughley said he wants Terry Crews for his late-night show on TV One, The D.L. Hughley Show, at the Television Critics Association press tour Wednesday.

Hughley's statement that he'd like Crews for his new show comes weeks after a tense back-and-forth between the two, after Hughley initially said Crews should've defended himself when the actor was allegedly sexually assaulted by his agent. (Since coming forward with allegations that he was groped by an agent at a party in 2016, Crews has become a voice in the #MeToo movement and even spoke out about sexual assault to Congress.)

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"I think it's hard for me to think that a dude with all those muscles can't tell an agent to not touch his ass," Hughley said in an interview with Vlad TV way back in August, a comment that Crews clapped back to in January. "Are you implying that I 'wanted' to be sexually assaulted?" Crews wrote on Twitter. "I'm listening, sir." Their tête-à-tête eventually got to a place where Crews asked Hughley, "Should I slap the sh-- out of you?" Suffice it to say, Crews going on Hughley's show would be a highly anticipated event, to say the least.

Following his comment that he'd like Crews on his show during a panel, TV Guide followed up with Hughley to elaborate on his thoughts about the situation. He said he wanted to have a conversation with Crews one on one, without the influence of social media where people can pile on. "Y0u can have a different perspective of a situation without having it being insulting somebody else," Hughley told TV Guide. "I think that now you are entitled to your perspective and I'm entitled to mine."

D.L. HughleyD.L. Hughley

Earlier in the day, Hughley said, "He's very big guy and I grew up a small guy. If you let someone do things to you, they keep doing it," a refrain that was, in essence, the same thing he'd said before — that Crews' size should've stopped the man who groped him from doing so. Was that what he meant? TV Guide asked.

"That's not what I was saying at all. What I was saying was the perception of what I was saying got lumped in with people making light of it," Hughley said. "I didn't [make light of it]. I said that when I grew up if you let somebody bully you they kept doing it. That was my perspective. I didn't say what he should have done. What happens is in this instance people say 'You said this ' and 'You said that.'"

When asked if he felt bad about anything he said, or if he felt like he needed to apologize, Hughley held firm. "Not at all. There would be no need for me to apologize. I don't know that I would have anything to be ashamed of. I think that he was speaking from his perspective and I was speaking from mine."