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Let's Make a Deal

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Let's Make A Deal
Let's Make A Deal
2:33

2:33 Let's Make A Deal

Cast & Crew See All

Wayne Brady
Jonathan Mangum

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Quiz Kids

Quiz Kids, a popular radio and TV series of the 1940s and 1950s, was created by Chicago public relations and advertising man Louis G. Cowan. Originally sponsored by Alka-Seltzer, the series was first broadcast on NBC from Chicago, June 28, 1940, airing as a summer replacement show for Alec Templeton Time. It continued on radio for the next 13 years. On television, the show was seen on NBC and CBS from July 6, 1949 to July 5, 1953, with Joe Kelly as quizmaster, and again from January 12 to September 27, 1956, with Clifton Fadiman as host.The premise of the original show involved Kelly asking questions sent in by listeners and researched by Eliza Hickok and Rachel Stevenson. Kelly often said that he was not an intellectual, and that he could not have answered any of the questions without knowing the answer from his flash card. Yet he was remarkably kind and affable, and put even novice young contestants at ease immediately. The answers were supplied by a panel of five children, chosen for their high IQs, strong academic interests, and appealing personalities, as well as such qualities as poise, quickness, and sense of humor. One of the first Quiz Kids was seven-year-old nature expert Gerard Darrow. For the initial premiere panel he was joined by Mary Ann Anderson, Joan Bishop, Van Dyke Tiers and Charles Schwartz.
1949 Game Show, Kids

Information Please

Information Please was an American radio quiz show, created by Dan Golenpaul, which aired on NBC from May 17, 1938 to April 22, 1951. The title was the contemporary phrase used to request from telephone operators what was then called "information" but is now called "directory assistance".The series was moderated by Clifton Fadiman. A panel of experts would attempt to answer questions submitted by listeners. For the first few shows, a listener was paid two dollars for a question that was used, and five dollars more if the experts could not answer it correctly. When the show got its first sponsor, the total amounts were increased to five and ten dollars respectively. A complete Encyclopædia Britannica was later added to the prize for questions that stumped the panel. The amounts went up to ten and twenty-five dollars when Lucky Strike took over sponsorship of the program.
1952 Game Show

You're in the Picture

You're in the Picture is an American television game show that aired on CBS for only one episode on Friday, January 20, 1961 at 9:30pm, the evening of the Inauguration of John F. Kennedy.The show, created by Don Lipp and Bob Synes, was an attempt by its host and star Jackie Gleason to "demonstrate versatility" after his success within variety shows and The Honeymooners. Gleason was joined by Johnny Olson as announcer and Dennis James doing live commercials for sponsor Kellogg's cereals.Technically, the show could be said to have run for two episodes, since the following Friday, Gleason appeared at the same time, but in a studio "stripped to the brick walls" and using the time to give what Time magazine called an "inspiring post-mortem", asking rhetorically "how it was possible for a group of trained people to put on so big a flop." Time later cited You're in the Picture as one piece of evidence that the 1960-61 TV season was the "worst in the 13-year history of U.S. network television."
1961 Game Show

Missus Goes A-Shopping

Missus Goes a Shopping was one of the earliest game shows to be broadcast on live television. The show first aired on CBS Radio from February 17, 1941 to December 21, 1951.On August 3, 1944 the early CBS Television network began airing a primetime TV version until January 22, 1946. The original host was John Reed King.
1947 Game Show

Truth or Consequences

A popular game in which contestants had to answer usually silly questions before a buzzer sounded (it was nicknamed 'Beulah'), or else perform wacky stunts, either inside or outside the studio. Created for radio in 1940 by Ralph Edwards, who hosted its early TV version, the series has aired in daytime and prime time, and was helmed for many years by Bob Barker. It was revived in 1977, hosted by Bob Hilton; and again in 1987, with Larry Anderson.
1950 Game Show

What's in a Word?

A summer-replacement word-association game in which panelists had to guess the simple rhyme a contestant had made up, with prompting from moderator Clifton Fadiman, the former host of NBC's 'Information Please.'
1954 Educational, Game Show

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