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Angel

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Angel: Season 5
0:15

0:15 Angel: Season 5

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David Boreanaz
Angel

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7th Heaven

11 Seasons
One of the most atypical weekly series to emerge from the Aaron Spelling TV factory, 7th Heaven, created by Spelling and Brenda Hampton, has eschewed the sex-and-sin shenanigans of such series as Beverly Hills 90210 and Melrose Place in favor of honest, three-dimensional family values, with generous doses of warmth, heart, humor, and pathos. There can be no doubt that this fundamentally wholesome program has struck a universal chord. The series has not only been lavishly praised by critics, honored by such organizations as the Parents Television Council, the Academy of Religious Broadcasting, and the Anti-Defamation League, and given innumerable industry awards, but it is also one of the most successful offerings of the WB network; indeed, it was the first WB series to run more than seven seasons, and during four of those seasons, it was the network's highest-rated show. Set in the suburban L.A. community of Glen Oak, the series revolves around the Camden family, headed by Eric Camden (Stephen Collins), pastor of the town's Community Church, and Eric's homemaker wife, Annie (Catherine Hicks). In the tradition of The Waltons, loyal 7th Heaven viewers have enjoyed the rare privilege of watching the Camden children grow up before their very eyes. When the series debuted on August 26, 1996, handsome and personable Matt Camden (Barry Watson) was 17 years old; basketball-playing Mary Camden (Jessica Biel) was 13 going on 14; intellectual, inquisitive Lucy Camden (Beverley Mitchell) was 12; happy-go-lucky Simon Camden (David Gallagher) was ten; and precocious Ruthie Camden (Mackenzie Rosman) was five. By the time the series entered its eighth season, the three oldest Camden kids were married and pursuing careers, while the two youngest were seasoned veterans of the school dating scene. (Two more Camden youngsters, twin boys Sam and David, were born halfway through the 1998-1999 season). All of the Camdens, parents included, have had more than their share of setbacks and tragedies (some of them absolutely devastating) as the series has rolled forward, but somehow all of the members of the clan, from patriarch Eric on down, have been able to recover, rally, and persevere with the help and support of their family and friends -- not to mention their inner faith. And unlike so many other TV series which traffic in personal interrelationships, the characters in 7th Heaven are very much a part of the "real" world. During its lengthy WB run, the series has exposed its principals to a wide variety of contemporary issues: teen suicide, racial prejudice, substance abuse, drunken driving, homelessness, negative peer pressure, teen pregnancy, Alzheimer's disease, the Holocaust, the war in Iraq, and the crisis in the Sudan. Eminently suitable for viewers of all ages, but never a mere sop to the "kiddie" trade nor a placebo for the clean-up-TV brigades, 7th Heaven has been and will likely always remain the jewel in the WB crown.
79   Metascore
1996 TVG Drama, Family, Other

One Tree Hill

9 Seasons
A youth-oriented drama following the lives of a group of friends in North Carolina from high school through postcollegiate life.
46   Metascore
2003 TV14 Drama, Other

Dawson's Creek

6 Seasons
Scripter Kevin Williamson is the creator/executive producer of this Warner Bros. series about small-town teens, set in Massachusetts but filmed in Wilmington, North Carolina. The central figure, 15-year-old filmmaker Dawson Leery (James Van Der Beek), is a high-school sophomore who idolizes Steven Spielberg and is already directing a horror short out of his home studio. Dawson is caught between two gals -- his longtime friend, tomboy Joey (Katie Holmes) and Jen (Michelle Williams), the new blonde in town, who's an atheist. Dawson's best buddy Pacey (Joshua Jackson) makes a play for his English teacher, is rejected, but nevertheless gets in the last word: "You blew it, lady, because I'm the best sex you'll never have!" With the constant sex talk, this TV series plays like a Peyton Place for the Millennium -- where jaded, world-weary teens have cool one-liners ready for every occasion, necessary if you live in a town where everyone keeps a stiff upper libido and analytical adolescent angst rules. Freud and Kinsey could have had a field day here, just trying to stay afloat in the psycho-sexual undercurrents of Dawson's Creek. The series premiered January 20, 1998 on the Warner Bros. network.
62   Metascore
1998 TVPG Drama, Other

Everwood

4 Seasons
Treat Williams starred in this warm-hearted family drama series as workaholic neurosurgeon Andrew Brown. Upon the death of his wife, Andrew realized that he had been sorely neglecting his children in favor of his work. As means of compensation, he moved his family out of Manhattan and into the mountain community of Everwood, CO, where he opened up a free clinic. Andrew's kids, 15-year-old Ephram (Gregory Smith) and nine-year-old Delia (Vivien Cardone), were at first resentful over being uprooted, while Everwood's resident doctor Harold Abbott (Tom Amandes) regarded Andrew as a threat to his own livelihood. Assembled by several former Dawson's Creek hands, Everwood made its WB Network debut on September 16, 2002.
62   Metascore
2002 TV14 Drama, Family

Felicity

4 Seasons
Beginning on September 29, 1998, as a "teen angst" romantic drama, the weekly, 60-minute WB series Felicity evolved into a "young adult angst" affair by the time the series ran its course on May 22, 2002. Each of the series' four seasons represented a different year in the college life of its heroine, dewey-eyed Felicity Porter (Keri Russell). Enrolling at the University of New York in Greenwich Village so that she could be near her high-school crush Ben Covington (Scott Speedman), Felicity soon discovered that Ben wasn't interested in her -- at least not at first -- but she decided to remain in school anyway. Just as Felicity fluctuated between a pre-med and an art major during her stay at U. of N.Y., so too did her romantic inclinations shift between Ben and her dorm advisor Noel Crane (Scott Foley), with both men falling in and out of love with Felicity at regular intervals, and she with them. During the series' first and last seasons, Felicity would report on her progress -- scholastic and otherwise -- in audiocassette letters sent to her old and never-seen friend Sally (whose voice was supplied by Janeane Garofolo). Other series regulars included Felicity's rather odd roommate Meghan Rotundi (Amanda Foreman), who may or may not have been into witchcraft; her best friend Julie Emrick (Amy Jo Johnson), who after several failed romances, one with Ben, dropped out of school -- and the series -- at the beginning of season three; another friend and classmate Elena Tyler (Tangi Miller), a girl of humble means who was attending college on a scholarship, and whose boyfriend, Tracy (Donald Faison), refused to have sex with her until marriage (he eventually "gave in," but wedding bells never rang); Ben's naïvely optomistic roommate Sean Blumberg (Greg Grunberg), he of the thousand-and-one "get rich quick" schemes and ultimately Noel's partner in an independent web-design firm -- not to mention the husband of the spooky Meghan; Javier Quintata (Ian Gomez), Felicity's gay boss at Dean & DeLuca, a campus café; Zoe Webb (Sarah Jane Morris), whom Noel weds at the end of season four; Lauren (Lisa Edelstein), young mistress of Ben's father, who ultimately bears Ben a child. Outside of the series' outrageous "double surprise" finale, which is right up there on the jaw-dropping meter with the last episodes of St. Elsewhere and Newhart, Felicity is best remembered for the shock delivered to its fans at the beginning of season two, in which star Keri Russell showed up with a new, very short haircut forsaking the long tresses that had become her trademark. With one stroke of the shears, both the series and its star became the darlings of the tabloid crowd -- and, of course, Felicity enjoyed the best ratings it ever had throughout its four-year history.
87   Metascore
1998 TV14 Drama, Other

Jack & Bobby

1 Season
The teen years of a future U.S. president and his brother (no, not the Kennedys; the McCallisters). The two standout students are being raised by a headstrong single mother, who's grooming them for greatness.
2004 TV14 Drama, Other

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