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Now that the strike is over, ...

Question: Now that the strike is over, are the actors legally obligated to return to work to complete whatever's left of the 22 episodes? Or, after a certain point, are they off the hook for the season? I guess the question is, are they signed for a specific number of episodes during a certain period of time (i.e., Aug-April), or do they have to complete the episodes no matter what the timeframe — even if that means working through the summer?Answer: That's a very complicated question. So complicated that I'm going to hand it off to a top TV talent agent to answer: "The basic answer is that yes, actors are obligated to return and finish a certain number of episodes," explains the tenpercenter, who asked not to be identified because his coworkers aren't aware he's an Aushole. " That said, there are all sorts of variables. One is that most actors' contracts define a 'season' with a beginning and end date. So, if studios ask the acto

Michael Ausiello

Question: Now that the strike is over, are the actors legally obligated to return to work to complete whatever's left of the 22 episodes? Or, after a certain point, are they off the hook for the season? I guess the question is, are they signed for a specific number of episodes during a certain period of time (i.e., Aug-April), or do they have to complete the episodes no matter what the timeframe even if that means working through the summer?

Answer: That's a very complicated question. So complicated that I'm going to hand it off to a top TV talent agent to answer: "The basic answer is that yes, actors are obligated to return and finish a certain number of episodes," explains the tenpercenter, who asked not to be identified because his coworkers aren't aware he's an Aushole. " That said, there are all sorts of variables. One is that most actors' contracts define a 'season' with a beginning and end date. So, if studios ask the actors to come back and work beyond certain dates, some of them are going to fight that. The one thing I can tell you for sure: The studios will try to force the path that costs them the least. Even if they have to weather a few lawsuits to do it." So that explains why a caravan of entertainment lawyers were spotted entering the Grey's Anatomy set yesterday. (That was a joke, BTW. At least I think it was.)