Actor Harold Perrineau is finally speaking out about the allegations his daughter Aurora his levied against Girls writer Murray Miller.

Aurora Perrineau revealed in November that she'd woken up to find the writer having non-consensual sex with her in 2012, when she was still just 17 years old. She reportedly took a polygraph test in order to support the veracity of her allegation, and passed it, but Girls creator Lena Dunham publicly dismissed Perrineau's story.

Dunham and co-creator Jenni Konner immediately rose to Miller's defense and said in a statement, "During every time of change there are also incidences of the culture, in its enthusiasm and zeal, taking down the wrong targets. We believe, having worked closely with him for more than half a decade, that this is the case with Murray Miller. While our first instinct is to listen to every woman's story, our insider knowledge of Murray's situation makes us confident that sadly this accusation is one of the 3% of assault cases that are misreported every year. We stand by Murray and this is all we'll be saying about this issue."

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After severe public backlash, Dunham walked back on her statement. Murray also had to retract a claim his defense team made on the matter, after his attorneys falsely alleged that Aurora Perrineau had demanded money from him.

Perrineau's father, who lists Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet, The Edge and Lost in his credits, has now spoken up to champion his daughter's bravery in sharing her experience with sexual assault, and he has committed himself to being part of the movement to eradicate abuse in Hollywood and elsewhere.

On Twitter, he wrote, "I've been silent for a few weeks now. Completely silent. I mean what do you say when you are watching your wife not eat or sleep? What do you say when you realized you couldn't protect your child? What do you say when your heart is just ... broken? Silence. In that silence, I noticed something. Someone — Aurora. I noticed her strength and bravery. I noticed her stand up. Stand up and say no more! No more terror, or fear, no more nightmares, no more hiding. And I realized I'm not watching some victim here, I'm in the presence of a warrior."

Perrineau added that the experience opened his eyes to the cultural change that is underway with the #metoo movement and pledged to participate in the process.

"I realized I am witnessing thousands of heroes stand up every day and say no more. And I finally had my #metoo moment. If you are willing to stand up, #metoo. If you are willing to fight, #metoo. If you are willing to say no more to this way of life where people think they can abuse you and get away with it, then I say, hells yes, #metoo."