I Can Get It For You Wholesale

  • 1951
  • 1 HR 30 MIN
  • NR
  • Drama

Smooth but not stellar adaptation of Weidman's novel, which later went to the Broadway stage as a musical and served to introduce Barbra Streisand to a waiting world. In this version Hayward is a model in a dress house on Seventh Avenue in New York. But she has aspirations far beyond the modeling ramp and decides to use her designing abilities to open her...read more

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Smooth but not stellar adaptation of Weidman's novel, which later went to the Broadway stage as a musical and served to introduce Barbra Streisand to a waiting world. In this version Hayward is a model in a dress house on Seventh Avenue in New York. But she has aspirations far beyond the

modeling ramp and decides to use her designing abilities to open her own company. To do this, she raids the firm she's with and steals Dailey, their best salesman, and Jaffe, the overseer of manufacturing. They pool their money and begin making clothes. Hayward is all business and tougher than the

average Seventh Avenue shark, but Dailey falls in love with her despite that. Sanders runs a Neiman-Marcus type department store and tells Hayward that he can make her a national designer if she will concentrate on creating evening gowns for his store and its exclusive clientele. Dailey is against

it and feels they should stay with what they know: dresses for the people, not some high-priced line for Park Avenueites. Hayward attempts to weasel out of the triumvirate but Dailey won't allow that. She then enters into a covert deal with Sanders to make evening gowns, thus allowing her desire

for notoriety to blind her in her relationship with Dailey. Afterwards she tells Jaffe and Dailey that if they don't deliver the gowns she's designing, she'll let the company go belly up. Jaffe and Dailey are not impressed by her threats and the small company goes bankrupt. Sanders and Hayward are

about to sail to Europe when he comes to the correct conclusion that she is only traveling with him to hurt Dailey, not because she loves him. He does the uncadlike thing and tells Hayward that she would be better off with Dailey. She returns to the company's offices, rushes into Dailey's arms,

and the film ends with the presumption that they can get back into business again, as well as into their former romance.

I CAN GET IT FOR YOU WHOLESALE is about as accurate an image as one can get of the "Rag Trade" circa 1951. These days, many of the larger firms have been acquired by conglomerates, but there are still enough small manufacturers around who would identify with the problems faced by the characters in

this film. It's a boy-meets-girl story but in a new setting that sustains the viewer's interest. Marvin Kaplan, one of TV's earliest character actors, does his usual fine job as "Four Eyes." Shot on location in New York City, one scene called for Hayward and Dailey to be inside a car; before the

cameras rolled, a crowd began to form around the auto, dozens, then hundreds of fans pressing in on the auto which frightened the actors who thought the car might be turned over. Director Gordon saved the day by worming his way through the immense throng and ordering Hayward and Dailey to sign

autographs from either window which they did until they were arm-weary. Hayward, by this film, was a Hollywood superstar and enjoyed strolling down Fifth Avenue, wearing dark glasses but being recognized anyway (which is what she hoped for) by her flaming red hair. "It's wonderful being a movie

star," she bubbled to a New York Post reporter on the set, "being able to go to the best Fifth Avenue shops and buy the toys for your children you never could have."

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Smooth but not stellar adaptation of Weidman's novel, which later went to the Broadway stage as a musical and served to introduce Barbra Streisand to a waiting world. In this version Hayward is a model in a dress house on Seventh Avenue in New York. But sh… (more)

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