Twogether

  • 1994
  • 2 HR 02 MIN
  • R
  • Drama, Romance

TWOGETHER is about a couple thrown together by coincidence and kept together by circumstance. It is a quality production, but the care that went into the filming of this romantic drama does not compensate for the mediocre script. The premise and style are interesting, but the characters are unpleasant, and the film, which is over two hours long, rambles. John...read more

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TWOGETHER is about a couple thrown together by coincidence and kept together by circumstance. It is a quality production, but the care that went into the filming of this romantic drama does not compensate for the mediocre script. The premise and style are interesting, but the characters

are unpleasant, and the film, which is over two hours long, rambles.

John Madler (Nick Cassavetes) is a talented but irresponsible painter. He has trouble paying the rent in his oceanside apartment, and the quality and quantity of his work is uneven. At an exhibition of his paintings, he meets Allison McKenzie (Brenda Bakke), who volunteers at the gallery. Their

sexual attraction overcomes them, and they leave the show. The next morning, they wake up in Las Vegas, hung over and married. They decide the marriage is a mistake and celebrate the divorce papers with a sexual tryst that results in pregnancy. Allison moves in with John, planning to stay until

the baby is born. Though they sleep together, they plan no romantic future together and are free to see other people.

Allison is wealthy but unconfident. Her idealism clashes with John's pessimism, and, though they grow close, their differences remain problematic. After the baby is born, Allison moves back in with her parents. John's building is sold to developers, and he decides to leave California for an

isolated, "problem-free" island. As he goes to the airport, Allison tries to talk him into staying. Wary of commitment, he leaves. Four years later, he is back. The couple decide to get married for a second, and permanent, time.

TWOGETHER's story is interesting but inconsistent. After two hours of extensive character development and growth, it ends abruptly, never explaining why John chose to return. The ambitious attempt to tie together several threads at once is not handled well. Many of the film's subplots are vehicles

for allowing us to understand John and Allison, but they take up too much screen time and take focus away from the heart of the film. Some of the film's best scenes, such as John's disc jockey friend deciding to broadcast only "good news" for a day, are enjoyable but rushed and inconsequential.

Though the writing is pretentious and the story is often silly, the film's style is creative and original. Scenes rarely flow together in a traditional way. Some begin in the middle of the action, without explanation, while others don't appear to fit the narrative at all. Nightmare sequences don't

reveal themselves as such until the characters wake up, and we see plot progress through conversation rather than action. With time, the audience learns about the characters and has little problem following the story. The technique saves the film from tedium. The acting is strong, but the dialogue

is often terrible, particularly during the sex scenes. Many of the characters' "deep" conversations will baffle viewers. The unusual nature of the romance spices up the film, but the bland and self-absorbed couple don't arouse much audience sympathy. The video box stresses the erotic nature of the

film, and while there are plenty of sex scenes, the fluffy advertising undermines the serious nature of the film. (Extensive nudity, sexual situations, extreme profanity.)

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