To Catch A Thief

Cary Grant is at his most suave and Grace Kelly is stunningly beautiful in TO CATCH A THIEF, a bubbly and effervescent Alfred Hitchcock romantic-suspenser that finds the Master in a relaxed and purely entertaining mood. Grant stars as a former high-class American thief known as "The Cat," who has retired on the French Riviera. When the area is hit by a...read more

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Cary Grant is at his most suave and Grace Kelly is stunningly beautiful in TO CATCH A THIEF, a bubbly and effervescent Alfred Hitchcock romantic-suspenser that finds the Master in a relaxed and purely entertaining mood. Grant stars as a former high-class American thief known as "The Cat,"

who has retired on the French Riviera. When the area is hit by a wave of jewel robberies, he becomes the prime suspect and gets mixed up with a seductive American socialite (Kelly) while trying to prove his innocence.

Hitchcock himself conceded that the film was "a lightweight," but even minor Hitchcock is more entertaining than the best efforts of his imitators and the film offers plenty to enjoy, not the least of which is its sleek and elegant look, courtesy of the dazzling Technicolor photography of the

French Riviera that won an Oscar. Kelly is incredibly sensuous as the quintessential Hitchcockian ice-princess. In the beginning, Hitchcock keeps cutting to her cold, distant profile, but when Cary walks her back to her hotel room, she suddenly grabs him and thrusts her lips right up to his mouth.

Hitch also delights in inserting as much sexual innuendo and suggestive imagery as possible, lingering on provocative necklace-cleavage shots and wry double-entendres. During a picnic, Kelly teasingly asks Cary if he wants a breast or a leg while she nibbles on cold chicken, and she fondles a long

umbrella after being frustrated that she can't seduce him. The film's most famous scene is the classic fireworks-kissing sequence, where exploding fireworks are orgasmically intercut with Kelly trying to seduce Cary. The suspense takes a back seat to the romance and travelogue aspects of the film,

but there is the usual amount of sly Hitchcock humor, provided by the dryly comical John Williams and the wonderfully boisterous Jesse Royce Landis as Kelly's vulgar mother.

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