Omega Doom

  • 1996
  • Movie
  • PG-13
  • Action, Martial Arts, Science Fiction

As mankind prepares to re-emerge after Armageddon, robot factions vie for ascendancy in this stultifying sci-fi pic that plays like a series of stage waits in a play with no rising action. In a future post-apocalyptic wasteland, the synthetic creature Omega Doom (Rutger Hauer) is a manufactured loner hero dedicated to the resurgence of the human race. Rumors...read more

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As mankind prepares to re-emerge after Armageddon, robot factions vie for ascendancy in this stultifying sci-fi pic that plays like a series of stage waits in a play with no rising action.

In a future post-apocalyptic wasteland, the synthetic creature Omega Doom (Rutger Hauer) is a manufactured loner hero dedicated to the resurgence of the human race. Rumors of mankind's renewal sweep through the android communities headed by Zed (Shannon Whirry), who rules the Droids, and

Blackheart (Tina Cote), who leads the Roms. In the robot gangs' deserted outpost, the only other residents are a bartender (Anna Katarina) and a disembodied head (Norbert Weisser), both of whom are sympathetic to Omega Doom's pro-human mission.

Both the Roms and the Droids scheme to locate a weapons cache that will enable them to consolidate power by wiping out both rival androids and people. Omega proves his superiority to the android tribes by defeating evil Marko (Jahi Zuri), who tortures the decapitated head. In order to give himself

backup, Omega helps out the disembodied head by providing it with the first in a series of new bodies. Pitting the Droids against the Roms, Omega promises to lead each faction to the buried arsenal. After eliminating Rom robot Iron Face (Cynthia Ireland) with her own weapon, Omega fatally wounds

Droid chieftain Zed. When Blackheart ambushes Omega, the bartender distracts her by showing her a pistol and luring her away. Given the opportunity to restore his functions, a revived Omega stabs Blackheart, decapitates her, and donates her torso to the head. With the most vicious robot leaders

dead, Omega, the head, and the bartender prepare for a hard-won peaceful coexistence with each other and with the human beings who are slated to arrive in the area.

Despite deliberately murky cinematography to lend it visual style and a soundtrack full of Dylan Thomas poetry to give it philosophical heft, sci-fi fans won't be as taken in by OMEGA DOOM's highfalutin posturing as are the film's robotic principals. This snail-paced action opus stretches a rubber

band of a plot to the breaking point. Veteran schlockmeister Albert Pyun seems to be going for a sci-fi riff on a Wild West adventure, a la Peter Hyams' OUTLAND (1981). But OMEGA DOOM lacks a star like Sean Connery, witty dialogue, a snappy editing rhythm, and just about everything else that made

that film work. The repetitious screenplay could serve as a dictionary definition of "extraneous." What point does the ongoing torture of the head serve, beyond time-killing sadism? Why is every Omega-Droids-Roms skirmish merely an instant replay of the preceding one? OMEGA DOOM is merely an

exercise in reviving moldy sci-fi cliches from their familiar genre graves. (Graphic violence.)

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  • Released: 1996
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Review: As mankind prepares to re-emerge after Armageddon, robot factions vie for ascendancy in this stultifying sci-fi pic that plays like a series of stage waits in a play with no rising action. In a future post-apocalyptic wasteland, the synthetic creature Ome… (more)

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