I'll Never Forget You

Filmed in black and white and Technicolor (for certain sequences), I'LL NEVER FORGET YOU is a remake of the 1933 Leslie Howard feature BERKELEY SQUARE, which was based on the play by Balderston and later made into a musical for Broadway. Power was already in London, having just starred in the touring company of "Mr. Roberts," and he walked right onto the...read more

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Filmed in black and white and Technicolor (for certain sequences), I'LL NEVER FORGET YOU is a remake of the 1933 Leslie Howard feature BERKELEY SQUARE, which was based on the play by Balderston and later made into a musical for Broadway. Power was already in London, having just starred in

the touring company of "Mr. Roberts," and he walked right onto the set of this film the following week. While shooting the film, the producers couldn't decide on a title, and it was alternately called BEYOND TIME AND SPACE as well as MAN OF TWO WORLDS. In Europe, it was sometimes known as THE

HOUSE ON THE SQUARE. Power is a dour American atomic physicist living in a Berkeley Square mansion he's inherited. His mood swings cause him to believe he may be about to have a mental breakdown. Power's best friend is Rennie, who tells him about some documents he's found in the house that speak

of an ancestor who also came from the US to live in England. Power believes he can actually change places with his antecedent because, according to his theory, time does not exist and the past, present, and future all happen simultaneously. Rennie says pish-tosh to all that and tells Power that

what he needs is a month in the country to clear those cobwebs out. Power later strolls through the streets during a thunderstorm and is struck by a lightning bolt. He comes out of his faint and finds that he is now in the 18th century! His fiancee is Campbell, and he is staying at the mansion

with her and her family. Since he'd already read all the information about his ancestor, he is able to function in his new role, except when he meets Campbell's sister, the beauteous Blyth (she took over the role when Constance Smith became ill). She was never mentioned in the old books about the

family and is so enchanting that he cannot take his eyes off her. Their mother, Browne, and their brother, Price, are angered when they see Power begin to transfer his affection to Blyth. Power's picture of the tranquil 18th century is shattered when he comes upon conditions that he thought

existed only in Dickens' mind. He decides to improve things by setting up a workshop and using his scientific knowledge to create startling inventions. Campbell thinks Power is nuts and wants to have him put away, but Blyth believes in Power and stands by him. During another thunderstorm Power is

shot forward to the 20th century where he awakens to find that he's been ill for several weeks. Rennie now introduces his sister, Blyth, to Power. She is the image of the woman he loved so much in the 18th century. Power digs further and learns that the 18th century Blyth died just after his

ancestor mysteriously vanished back then. Not too suprisingly, Power and Blyth fall in love immediately. It's a terrific story but less than a terrific film. Power is given little opportunity to show any of his humor and the entire mood of the film is lethargic and a bit sombre.

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