Hollywood Canteen

Patriotic pap, but so what? Director Daves had a smash with STAGE DOOR CANTEEN and followed it quickly with this film, one of those patriotic displays of self-congratulation WWII Hollywood was so good at. The plot lies like a feather. After being wounded fighting in the Pacific, Hutton, a young soldier, returns to the US on leave and visits the Hollywood...read more

Rating:

Patriotic pap, but so what? Director Daves had a smash with STAGE DOOR CANTEEN and followed it quickly with this film, one of those patriotic displays of self-congratulation WWII Hollywood was so good at.

The plot lies like a feather. After being wounded fighting in the Pacific, Hutton, a young soldier, returns to the US on leave and visits the Hollywood Canteen with his best pal (Dane Clark). The Canteen is tended by John Garfield, Bette Davis, and a host of other stars playing themselves, and

when some of them learn of Hutton's crush on actress Joan Leslie, a phony raffle is arranged and Hutton wins first prize--a kiss from Leslie. Later Hutton really hits the jackpot when he is counted the one-millionth serviceman to enter the Canteen. His prize is a night in Hollywood with any

actress he wants. On the big night, Leslie doesn't show up; however, she appears at Union Station, where Hutton prepares to leave for reassignment, explaining that she ran out of gas, professing her love for the young GI, and promising that she'll await his return.

The movie is overloaded with talent, much of it ill-used, with a list of songs almost as long as the cast. Best bits: Jack Benny, Greenstreet and Lorre, and the unflappably cheery Andrews Sisters, singing patriotic-bounce ballads like "Gettin' Corns for My Country." Anyway, good-natured as all get

out.

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