Hello Sister!

  • 1933
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

Two small-town girls, Pitts and Mallory, venture to New York and wind up with a pair of city boys, Dunn and Ray. Pitts, a bit on the psychotic side, falls for the shy Dunn, whom she discovers is in love with the more glamorous Mallory. Pitts decides to break them apart by spreading false rumors. The unhappy Pitts thinks that the only way she can get Dunn's...read more

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Two small-town girls, Pitts and Mallory, venture to New York and wind up with a pair of city boys, Dunn and Ray. Pitts, a bit on the psychotic side, falls for the shy Dunn, whom she discovers is in love with the more glamorous Mallory. Pitts decides to break them apart by spreading false

rumors. The unhappy Pitts thinks that the only way she can get Dunn's attention is to kill herself. She turns on the gas in her house and accidentally causes an explosion. Dunn sees the disaster and rushes into the flames to save his love, but finds only Pitts. After a deathbed confession, the

pair end up in each other's bandaged arms, with Pitts dying moments later. Dunn and Mallory, who had tried to leave town, get together at the deathbed. The film described here is actually WALKING DOWN BROADWAY, which was directed by Erich von Stroheim. It was his first (and only) sound film and

was also brought in under budget and under schedule--a pleasant surprise from von Stroheim. It was, unfortunately, the last film he was to direct. Caught in a studio war between the sympathetic Winfield Sheehan and the insensitive Sol Wurtzel, von Stroheim's 14,000 feet of film were rewritten,

reshot, and recut into this 5800-foot version known as HELLO SISTER! Co-written by Leonard Spigelgass and photographed by James Wong Howe, WALKING DOWN BROADWAY was reportedly void of the spectacular nature so often associated with his work. It was, in fact, a compelling psychological study of a

romance clouded with lesbian undertones. Wurtzel is said to have not understood the film, entirely missing the subtle nuances it offered. Although he promised a test screening to let the audience judge for themselves, he arranged only for studio employees to view it. Word was out that Wurtzel

hated it, so naturally his spineless yes-men followed suit--forever condemning what most likely would have been a masterpiece. After this injustice, the great director of GREED resorted to a string of unrealized projects, as well as working as a scriptwriter (SAN FRANCISCO, BETWEEN TWO WOMEN) and

appearing in numerous films (THE GRAND ILLUSION, SUNSET BOULEVARD). His days as a director were over, however, and the depressing thought still remains--there is no known existing print of WALKING DOWN BROADWAY.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Two small-town girls, Pitts and Mallory, venture to New York and wind up with a pair of city boys, Dunn and Ray. Pitts, a bit on the psychotic side, falls for the shy Dunn, whom she discovers is in love with the more glamorous Mallory. Pitts decides to bre… (more)

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