Amy's Orgasm

Written and directed by its star, Julie Davis, this Bridget Jones wannabe is a depressingly retrograde, "post-feminist" romantic comedy that takes an astonishingly condescending attitude toward women. Amy Mandell (Davis) is an attractive, soon-to-be 29-year-old Ivy-League grad who's not only sworn off men completely but has made a successful career of being...read more

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Reviewed by Ken Fox
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Written and directed by its star, Julie Davis, this Bridget Jones wannabe is a depressingly retrograde, "post-feminist" romantic comedy that takes an astonishingly condescending attitude toward women. Amy Mandell (Davis) is an attractive, soon-to-be 29-year-old Ivy-League grad who's not only sworn off men completely but has made a successful career of being alone. Amy's claim to fame is having written Why Love Doesn't Work, a self-help book/manifesto that declares romantic love a sucker's game and claims that women are perfectly capable of finding happiness without men. The book has created quite a sensation and Amy's bossy publicist, Janet (Caroline Aaron), has her on a tight schedule of book signings and public appearances that include a guest spot on the controversial radio show hosted by notoriously sexist shock jock Matthew Starr (Nick Chinlund). Dressed in a low-cut top, no bra and hooker-length miniskirt, Amy shows up at Starr's studio prepared for the worst, and the worst is pretty much what the gravelly voiced DJ gives her. Even though he leers at her breasts and insults her on the air, Amy barely hesitates when Starr later asks her out; clearly there's something about this guy she likes. By the end of the second date, all her "feminist" principles have gone right out the window, and Amy sets about confirming every suspicion Starr had about her in the first place. Her whole way of thinking about male-female relationships is simply the sour-grapes reaction to a bad break-up, and she is indeed afraid of sex: Joking that she's "sexorexic," Amy confesses that her four-year stretch of celibacy is more the result of a psychological disorder rather than any lifestyle choice. Once they do have sex, Amy is reduced to a quivering, neurotic mess; she makes Prozac pin-up Elizabeth Wurtzel look like a pillar of strength. When Starr doesn't call the following day, Amy's insecurity and self-loathing become overwhelming. The movie reaches its absolute nadir as the accusatory voices in her head taunt her about her "big Jewish ass." Davis not only wrote and directed the film but edited it as well, all of which is no mean feat. Too bad she couldn't have lent some of her own gumption and self-assurance to her pathetic heroine.

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  • Released: 2002
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Written and directed by its star, Julie Davis, this Bridget Jones wannabe is a depressingly retrograde, "post-feminist" romantic comedy that takes an astonishingly condescending attitude toward women. Amy Mandell (Davis) is an attractive, soon-to-be 29-yea… (more)

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