When the first five minutes of Wicked City were released, there was a fair amount of eye-rolling at Ed Westick's character Kent gruesomely murdering an anonymous woman mid-blow job. And though there is a fair share of dead women (and blow jobs) in Tuesday's premiere, creator Steven Baigelman insists Wicked City will be a different kind of serial killer show.

Set in 1982 Los Angeles, Wicked City follows the necrophiliac serial killer Kent and Betty (Erica Christensen), a single mother who becomes Kent's partner in romance and murder. Jeremy Sisto and Gabriel Luna play the cops on Kent's case, while Taissa Farmiga stars as an ambitious young reporter who becomes entangled in Kent's killings after nearly becoming a victim herself.

So how will a show about a serial killer couple avoid becoming yet another violence porn series? Hear what Baigelman has to say in our Q&A below:

There are so many serial killer shows out there. What do you think is going to set Wicked Cityapart?
Steven Baigelman:
The idea of 1982, Sunset Strip, sex, drugs and rock and roll. And the idea of a place where people come to seek fame and fortune, whether it be rock stars or movie stars. And Los Angeles at the time was the serial killer capital of the country, and the idea that somebody like that would also come here for the same reasons and choose his victims for the same reasons. So it's this commentary on fame. But even more to the point is who this serial killer is and what type of person he is. And the idea of this love affair that develops between him and Betty, and they become this Bonnie and Clyde/Romeo and Juliet team of serial killers. Kent and Betty are two people who want the same things as anybody else, which is love and connection, the idea of family, the love of children. And in a lot of ways, what we've tried to do is create characters who, aside from the fact that they're serial killers, are just like us.

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How do you make an audience sympathize with two characters who are brutal serial killers?
Baigelman:
What interests me about people is not what makes them different, but what makes them the same. This notion of when people look at people like Kent or people in the real world like that and they point a finger and say they're monsters, I tend not to do that. I tend to think that they're people, flesh and blood. They just happen to have this other thing that they do that I don't do. So once that happens, they're humanized for me. So the challenge for me was really humanizing them first and imbuing them with qualities that we all have. So in a weird way it wasn't a challenge. It was just truthfully writing those characters.

It definitely seems like Kent has some mommy issues. How much are we going to learn about his relationships with his parents and what's motivating his murders?
Baigelman:
We will learn more about him and we'll understand the similarities in some ways, the obsessive similarities. The other thing I wanted to do was create a mirror image between Kent and Jack (Sisto). One guy's putting his new family together and the other guy's trying to keep his family together. They're sort of struggling with similar issues. We're going to learn about Kent's past and understand it completely. And hopefully it will be the kind of story where you can empathize even more with him.

Betty also has a very sadistic side. What can you reveal about where that drive comes from?
Baigelman:
We may reveal a little bit about that. But one of the things I think about is oftentimes people come from really lousy backgrounds and they turn out to be people who are trying to save the world. And then there's people who come from really awesome, terrific background and turn out to be murderers. So we may learn a little bit about her background, but that's still yet to be determined.

Will all of Kent and Betty's victims be female?
Baigelman:
You'll have to tune in. That's a pretty good way of saying we have some surprises in store.

There's a lot of sex on this show. Which has been trickier for you to do on network TV: the sex or the violence?
Baigelman:
I think interestingly enough as a society, forget about network, we're more comfortable with violence than we are with depictions of sex and love. We have some pretty kinky sex on this show. And I think the fact that we're on ABC and network television is striking right away, but I would say depicting sex is a little bit more challenging.

How do you make a series that features so much violence against women without fetishizing that violence?
Baigelman:
That's really key to us. It's very, very important that we don't do that. That's why when you asked me if they were going to have different kinds of victims, I said tune in. There will be surprises about the kills in the future and how and why. Our writers' room is actually predominantly female. It's mostly women in the room. And that's not accidental in the sense that it was really important that this not be violence porn and it not fetishize violence against women. And through Jack and his feelings about these victims, and our young journalist Karen (Farmiga), there's the idea of making it about the victims, not throwing them away as just people who were killed, but actually keeping them in some ways alive was really important to us. Look, at the end of the day, we're a show that's centered around on a pair of serial killers and most serial killers kill women. That's where we're starting. So at the end of the day, we're aware of the fact that those are questions that are going to be asked of us. But we're very mindful of not making it that. ... We'll see violence, but more of it off screen than on. Things will be changing a little bit. And again, the kinds of victims that begin to appear a little bit later in the season might surprise you.

As Betty and Kent grow closer and kill together more, will we see Betty become more self-assured and more of an equal to Kent?
Baigelman:
Yes, and I think that that's another thing that helps us with the whole violence-against-women thing. Not to dismiss it, but the women in this show, for me, always needed to be women seeking and realizing a certain level of empowerment. I see the women in this show, whether it's on Jack's side or Kent's side, as strong. So for Betty, as demented as it is considering how she's realizing this side of herself, it's a journey of empowerment and a journey of self-realization. It's a love story, but she will rise to the occasion, no question about it. And she'll find her independence inside that relationship in ways that will be surprising.

Wicked City premieres Tuesday at 10/9c on ABC.