The sun might be shining, but nothing's brighter than this week's slate of TV premieres. Lounge about this weekend with the premiere of HBO's Gentleman Jack, a historical love story; Chambers, a new Netflix horror series; and CBS' The Red Line, a heavy-hitting story about three families in Chicago by legendary producer Ava DuVernay.

These recommendations courtesy of TV Guide are here to help you through your weekend binge. And if you're looking for even more suggestions, head over to TV Guide's Watch This Now! page, which has hand-picked recommendations for all the best shows you can start watching immediately.

1. Gentleman Jack

Gentleman Jack is a historical love story like you never seen before. Based on the journals of Anne Lister, a wildly successful business woman in England circa the 1830s, the HBO and BBC One co-production comes from Sally Wainwright (Happy Valley) and explores the life of a woman who demanded all the rights men of her era were given - including the right to marry the woman she loves. This show is a business drama, forbidden romance, and feminist inspiration all wrapped up in a British period piece.

2. Chambers

Netflix's latest horror offering, Chambers, is about a teenage girl whose recent traumatic heart transplant takes a sudden turn. At first, Sasha (Sivan Alyra Rose) seems to have a new lease on life, not only because of her new heart, but because the parents of the donor want to gift her with the life their daughter will now never have. However, that free scholarship comes with supernatural strings — Sasha starts changing right in front of her family's eyes into the wealthy, privileged psychopath her heart came from. Uma Thurman and Tony Goldwyn also star.

3. The Red Line

From mega-producers Ava DuVernay and Greg Berlanti comes CBS' new drama, The Red Line. Starring Noah Wyle, the show takes a look at three Chicago families in the wake of a fatal shooting of a black man by the police. The show raises many questions: How can a white father be there for his black daughter after the violent murder of her black father when he hasn't experienced that fear? How can politicians push forward change in abandoned communities without under-the-table deals? Will the police ever police themselves, or will they protect their own at any cost? In a tight eight-episode season, The Red Line doesn't answer all these questions neatly, and it's better for leaning into the complications.

If you're still looking for something to watch, remember to check out TV Guide's Watch This Now! feature. It's full of hand-picked recommendations, from the talked-about shows to the gems you can't afford to pass up.