From major streaming service announcements to life-changing realizations for some of our favorite characters, it's been a busy week in the world of television — and TV Guide is here to help. We sifted through the biggest stories to bring you this week's most significant TV moments, both on and off screen.

Best Payoff: On Tuesday's Jeopardy! James Holzhauer put the show's previous one-day record to shame by winning $110,914 in a single game (the previous record was $77,000). To do so, he wagered a whopping $38,314 on the Final Jeopardy round. His total would've trounced his fellow contestants even if he'd gotten it wrong, but that's still a lot of dough to lay on the line. -- Amanda Bell

Most Romantic Cliffhanger: Jane the Virgin's love triangle got a whole new wrinkle in the final seconds of Wednesday's episode. Just as Michael/Jason (Brett Dier) was ready to leave Jane (Gina Rodriguez) behind for good so her life with Rafael (Justin Baldoni) could get back to normal, his fishing pole hit the ceiling of her front porch, which showered him in stucco — the same "Florida snow" that made his first kiss with Jane so magical. As Michael's memories came flooding back, we were treated to a tear-jerking montage of his sweetest moments with Jane. Welcome back, Michael Cordero! — Kelly Connolly

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Biggest Mic Drop: It's extremely hard to break through the Coachella noise in the days before 1 million millennials make their annual pilgrimage to the holiest of Instagram sites. But professional provocateur Donald Glover managed to disrupt convention yet again when he announced that the super-secret project he'd been working on with Rihanna, filmed in Cuba, is a movie named Guava Island. The movie will debut at Coachella on Thursday, a day before Childish Gambino's performance at the festival, and will subsequently be available for streaming on Amazon on Saturday, April 13 starting at 12:01 a.m. PST. The service will open it up to non-subscribers for the first 18 hours at amazon.com/guavaisland. Only Donald Glover could drop the mic before even opening his mouth. — Malcolm Venable

Most Tragic Use of Walruses: Netflix's nature series Our Planet is already full of warning signs that global climate change is a threat to all life on the planet, but we're used to only hearing about an animal being wiped off the face of the Earth or seeing sheets of ice crash into the ocean. The second episode of Our Planet captures a moment that will make you immediately buy a Prius: the sight of walruses falling off cliffs because the ice they used to use have all melted away. Hundreds of dead walruses lie on the coast, their blubbery bodies crushed from the fall down the sea cliff, a direct result of human impact on the environment. It's horrifying and a reminder that we need to do more to protect the planet and all of its inhabitants. (WARNING: VIDEO IS NSFL.) — Tim Surette

Best Social Commentary in a Thriller: Jordan Peele's take on The Twilight Zone harkened back to his breakout film Get Out this week with "Replay," an episode that follows Sanaa Lathan's Nina Harrison as she tries to escape a creepy cop who's hunting her and her son in multiple timelines. It's disturbing, it's social commentary as art, and it's peak Peele. — Malcolm Venable

GIF of the Week: Kudos to Kit Harington for having a sense of humor about the weirder elements of Game of Thrones as he hosted Saturday Night Live this weekend. One of the funniest moments came when the show pitched a bevy of other sequel/prequel/spin-off ideas for the HBO epic, including Castle Black, a tale of forbidden love between Jon Snow and a White Walker that gave us this epic snippet of sass. -- Amanda Bell

<em><a href="https://www.tvguide.com/tvshows/saturday-night-live/100385/" target="_blank">Saturday Night Live</a></em>Saturday Night Live


Most Likely to Get Our $6.99: Disney+ All the Star Wars movies, a Rogue One prequel-ish series focused on Cassian Andor and K2SO, The Mandalorian, a bunch of High School Musicals, original Marvel series starring Bucky and Falcon and Scarlet Witch and Vision, another Lady and the Tramp, Toy Story spin-offs, The Simpsons, and an entire library of classic Disney movies... just start auto-deducting the $6.99 from our bank account now. Why wait until Nov. 12? — Christopher Rosen

Best Existential Crisis: In order to save Elliot (Hale Appleman) and Julia (Stella Maeve) on The Magicians, Quentin (Jason Ralph) had to prove his "true love of Fillory," which was a pretty difficult thing to do for a guy as disillusioned with magic as Quentin has become. Ultimately, he had to grapple with the realization that his idyllic perception of Fillory from childhood may clash with the random hellscape he's been forced to endure in the actual Fillory, but that didn't mean that the meaning and the purpose he found in the Fillory and Further novels wasn't real or powerful. This scene was a heartbreaking love letter to fiction and escapism, and it was all wrapped in a pretty breathtaking performance by Jason Ralph, so yes, thank you, more please! — Lindsay MacDonald

Most Loaded Debate: Jake (Andy Samberg) and Amy (Melissa Fumero) faced down a life-changing question in Thursday's Brooklyn Nine-Nine when they realized they had opposing views on having kids. (Amy thought they talked about kids before tying the knot; Jake thought they were talking about water parks.) Always a planner, Amy tried to hash out the issue with a structured, moderated debate, which didn't solve their problems. Still, Jake realized eventually that being afraid doesn't necessarily mean he shouldn't take the leap — and in the meantime, he got to bare his soul to at least five licensed debate moderators. — Kelly Connolly

(Disclosure: TV Guide is owned by CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation.)

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Melissa Fumero and Andy Samberg, <em>Brooklyn Nine-Nine</em>Melissa Fumero and Andy Samberg, Brooklyn Nine-Nine