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13 Shows We're Looking Forward to in the Rest of 2022

Patience is overrated

Emma D'Arcy and Matt Smith, House of the Dragon

Emma D'Arcy and Matt Smith, House of the Dragon

Ollie Upton/HBO

Like Nathan Fielder in The Rehearsal, we believe there's no social interaction you can't plan ahead for — you just have to know enough about TV. To help you pre-plan your small talk, we've compiled a list of all the most exciting shows coming in the back half of 2022, whether they're brand new series, adaptations of popular movies, spin-offs of shows you already love, or new seasons of ongoing favorites. You probably already know about the Yellowstone spin-off and the Game of Thrones prequel, but did you know there's a League of Their Own show coming soon? Or an adaptation of Interview with the Vampire? Or a show from the creators of The Americans in which Steve Carell plays a therapist? Now you do.

TV Guide has rounded up the shows we're looking forward to the most in the second half of 2022. From returning favorites like Reservation Dogs and The Good Fight to new shows like Game of Thrones prequel House of the Dragon and Yellowstone spin-off 1923, these are the series to add to your calendars now.


The Resort

Premiere: July 28 on Peacock

Cristin Milioti and William Jackson Harper, The Resort

Cristin Milioti and William Jackson Harper, The Resort 

Peacock

The White Lotus had a murder mystery; The Resort has a missing persons case. The latest entry in everyone's favorite summer TV genre — shows about sad people getting into uncomfortable situations on fancy vacations — is this Peacock series about a married couple (Cristin Milioti and William Jackson Harper) whose tropical getaway is interrupted when they're pulled into the disappearance of a teen (Skyler Gisondo) who went missing 15 years ago. Every mystery is better when it involves a flip phone. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]


Paper Girls

Premiere: July 29 on Prime Video

Riley Lai Nelet, Camryn Jones, Fina Strazza, and Sofia Rosinsky, Paper Girls

Riley Lai Nelet, Camryn Jones, Fina Strazza, and Sofia Rosinsky, Paper Girls

Anjali Pinto/Amazon Studios

If Stranger Things has you hankering for shows about '80s kids riding their bikes into trouble, check out Paper Girls. Based on Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang's comic book series, which ran from 2015 to 2019, the show follows four newspaper delivery girls who get caught in a conflict between rival factions in a time war (awesome) and travel through time, where they meet their future selves. It's a safe bet that if you get in on the ground floor of this one, your future self will thank you. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]


Reservation Dogs

Premiere: Aug. 3 on Hulu

Paulina Alexis, Lane Factor, D'Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai, and Devery Jacobs, Reservation Dogs

Paulina Alexis, Lane Factor, D'Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai, and Devery Jacobs, Reservation Dogs

Shane Brown/FX

One of 2021's best comedies ended its first season with its core foursome fractured as Elora Danan (Devery Jacobs) drove off to California without her friends, who opted to stay home in Oklahoma. FX's Reservation Dogs operates at such a relaxed pace that it can sometimes blindside you with its comedy and its emotionally resonant moments, and I look forward to a second season of unexpected laughter and tears. Consider this my official plea to the masses to help this series blow up as much as co-creator Taika Waititi's other show, pirate comedy Our Flag Means Death, has. -Allison Picurro [Trailer]


A League of Their Own

Premiere: Aug. 12 on Prime Video

A League of Their Own

A League of Their Own

Prime Video

There's no crying in baseball, but there are remakes in Hollywood, and this twist on Penny Marshall's classic 1992 comedy is the right kind of remake. The show, created by Will Graham and Broad City's Abbi Jacobson (who also stars), starts with the same idea as the movie: It's a fictionalized spin on the real-life World War II-era founding of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. But the series populates that world with all-new characters and pushes the story in new directions, spotlighting queer and Black baseball players in a way the movie did not. Add in an all-star cast — which also includes D'Arcy Carden, Chanté Adams, Kate Berlant, Roberta Colindrez, and Nick Offerman — and the bases are loaded. We can't wait. -Kelly Connolly [Trailer]


Never Have I Ever

Premiere: Aug. 12 on Netflix

Maitreyi Ramakrishnan and Romona Young, Never Have I Ever

Maitreyi Ramakrishnan and Romona Young, Never Have I Ever

Lara Solanki/Netflix

In many ways, Never Have I Ever Season 2 gave me everything I wanted — a huge win for Team Paxton (Darren Barnet), namely — but this is first and foremost a show about a high school love triangle, and I understand that my happiness will probably be short lived in its upcoming third (and penultimate) season, after Eleanor (Ramona Young) told Ben (Jaren Lewison) about Devi's (Maitreyi Ramakrishnan) feelings for him in the finale. Still, I'm enchanted by this show's mix of silly teen rom-comedy, compassionate musings on the lingering pervasiveness of grief, and the omniscient narration of John McEnroe. -Allison Picurro


House of the Dragon

Premiere: Aug. 21 on HBO and HBO Max

Paddy Considine, House of the Dragon

Paddy Considine, House of the Dragon

Ollie Upton/HBO

House of the Dragon tells the story of the decline of House Targaryen, a historical event that led to the events of Game of Thrones 200 years later. What gives me faith that HotD will restore the Thrones franchise to its pre-final season glory is the fact that Paddy Considine leads the ensemble cast as King Viserys Targaryen I. Considine is a great but not especially famous actor, and this is the biggest role of his career. HBO could have gotten anyone else, so he must have been chosen because he's the perfect actor for the role. Casting him indicates that the people making this show know what they're doing. -Liam Mathews [Trailer | Everything we know about House of the Dragon]


The Patient

Premiere: Aug. 30 on Hulu

Steve Carell

Steve Carell

NBC / Contributor

Joe Weisberg and Joel Fields gave us The Americans, one of the best shows of the past decade, which is enough to get me hooked on the mere idea of this FX-produced drama about a therapist (Steve Carell) held hostage by his serial killer patient (Domhnall Gleeson). I'm really glad Carell's character drove off a cliff on The Morning Show, freeing him up to do a show with a premise as interesting as this one. -Allison Picurro


The Good Fight

Premiere: Sept. 8 on Paramount+

Andre Braugher, The Good Fight

Andre Braugher, The Good Fight

Paramount+

What do we know about the sixth and final season of The Good Fight? We know Andre Braugher will be there, playing a kind of Saul Goodman through the Kings' looking glass: a showman lawyer by the name of Ri'Chard Lane who is forced on Liz's (Audra McDonald) firm as a new name partner. We know he'll be wearing those glasses (see above). I'd argue we don't need to know anything else. And even if we knew none of this, I'd still be excited to watch TV's most go-for-broke legal drama go out in a blaze of glory, giving us one last season of juiced up commentary on the state of American hypocrisy. -Kelly Connolly


The Midnight Club

Premiere: Oct. 7 on Netflix

The Midnight Club

The Midnight Club

Netflix/Youtube

This is the latest project from prolific horror maestro Mike Flanagan, whose previous Netflix shows include The Haunting of Hill House and Midnight Mass, two of the finest works of horror in any medium of the past 10 years. It's an adaptation of a 1994 teen thriller by Christopher Pike about a group of terminally ill young people living in a hospice ward who gather at midnight to tell each other scary stories. They make a pact that when the first of them dies, they'll communicate with the rest from beyond the grave. Nothing could go wrong there! This looks to skew a little YA for my tastes, but in Flanagan we trust, so it's an automatic watch. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]


Tulsa King

Premiere: Nov. 13 on Paramount+

Sylvester Stallone, Tulsa King

Sylvester Stallone, Tulsa King

Brian Douglas/Paramount+

Tulsa King comes from of an unexpected pair of writer-producers with complementary skill sets. The Paramount+ crime drama about a New York mafioso exiled to Oklahoma is created and executive-produced by Taylor Sheridan, the busy producer behind Yellowstone and its many spin-offs. Sheridan knows how to create heartland stories like no one else, but he has no experience writing about Italian-American crooks from the Northeast. But Terence Winter sure does. So Sheridan enlisted Winter, Sopranos veteran and Boardwalk Empire creator, to serve as Tulsa King's showrunner. It's a powerful pairing put over the top with the addition of Sylvester Stallone, who stars in his first series regular role as mob capo Dwight "The General" Manfredi. It's Taylor Sheridan's take on The Sopranos (and Lilyhammer), and it sounds counterintuitive enough to work. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]


Interview With the Vampire

Premiere: Fall TBD on AMC and AMC+

Jacob Anderson, Interview with the Vampire

Jacob Anderson, Interview with the Vampire

Alfonso Bresciani/AMC

Jacob Anderson, best known as Game of Thrones' Grey Worm, seems like a cool guy, and I'm happy that he has a starring role in the show that AMC hopes will become its next big franchise after The Walking Dead and Breaking Bad/Better Call Saul. Anderson plays soulful vampire Louis in this series inspired by author Anne Rice's famous romantic horror novels (AMC has another Rice series, Lives of the Mayfair Witches, in the works as well). Lestat, Louis' truly evil counterpart, is played by relatively unknown actor Sam Reid, who could become a star thanks to the juicy role, which was played by Tom Cruise in the 1994 movie (Louis was played by Brad Pitt). I'm a sucker for gothic vampire stuff, and the talent in front of and behind the camera on this one leads me to believe it will be well-made high-end horror. -Liam Mathews [Trailer]


1923

Premiere: December on Paramount+

Harrison Ford and Helen Mirren, 1923

Harrison Ford and Helen Mirren, 1923

Dave J Hogan/Getty Images for Paramount+

I'm not entirely sure how to categorize 1923. Is it a sequel series to 1883, creator Taylor Sheridan's prequel spin-off to his massive Western drama Yellowstone? Is it an anthology series, since it's a new story set in the same world? Is it its own thing? Whatever it is, I'm excited for it, because it stars Harrison Ford and Helen Mirren. Harrison Ford literally could not be a more perfect star for a Taylor Sheridan show. He's a cranky old movie star who owns a ranch in Wyoming. I can hear him reciting Sheridan's distinctive homespun philosophy already. The story is about the Dutton family trying to survive on the ranch during a time of drought, lawlessness, social upheaval, and economic depression. If Harrison Ford doesn't grumble about how all these flappers from the big city with their short skirts and bobbed hair need to stay the hell off his ranch, I'm canceling my Paramount+ subscription. -Liam Mathews [Everything we know about 1923]


Love and Death

Premiere: TBD on HBO Max

Elizabeth Olsen, Love and Death

Elizabeth Olsen, Love and Death

HBO Max

We've already gotten one show this year about ax murderer Candy Montgomery — Hulu's Candy, starring Jessica Biel — but the story of a 1980s housewife-turned-killer is rich with enough potential to warrant multiple adaptations. David E. Kelley takes the reins here, and Elizabeth Olsen stars as Montgomery, alongside an exciting ensemble that includes Jesse Plemons, Lily Rabe, and Patrick Fugit. -Allison Picurro

The Best New Shows of 2022 So Far

Adam Scott, Zach Cherry, John Turturro, and Britt Lower, Severance

Adam Scott, Zach Cherry, John Turturro, and Britt Lower, Severance

Apple TV+