Thinking about ditching cable? You're not alone. In 2018, 33 million people broke up with their cable providers (up from 25 million in 2017), continuing a trend that's gradually making the traditional cable package look like it's going the way of the landline.

Don't get us wrong: Cable has its advantages. Many cable companies are offering "free" WiFi connectivity around town, and some, like Spectrum, are making cool subscriber-only content like L.A.'s Finest. Ditching cable can be a hassle, too. Going cable-free may require purchasing new equipment like an Apple TV or an Amazon Fire Stick. Cable packages are convenient ways to get a ton of great shows and movies — more than one person or family could ever possibly watch. Of course, Netflix has a lot of options, too. As does Hulu. And Amazon Prime Video. Still, in an increasingly streaming world, cable can sometimes feel like a burden — a 20-inch cheesecake when all you want is a slice.

Related: The best live TV streaming services for cord-cutters

And then there's the cost. Many companies make their phone-internet-cable bundles difficult to untangle, so it's not uncommon for bills to reach over $200 a month — an annual cost that's as much as a down payment on a new car. Cable may be convenient and more rewarding than we'd care to admit — oh the joy of curling up on the couch and seeing what's on! — but depending how much you pay for it versus how much you actually use it, keeping cable might not be the best financial choice for you. If you've weighed the pros and cons and still want to banish the box, we're here to help.

Related: Which streaming services have the best channel lineup?

Kicking cable can be hard: There are a lot of streaming services to choose from, and the fear of missing out on favorite shows and live events makes cutting cable seem like it'll require complex calculations. It does, but we've done the tough stuff for you. This guide considers your TV-watching preferences and habits and then offers suggestions on how to build a custom package that gets you all the things you want without the things you don't.

(Disclosure: Links to partner retailers may earn money to support our work.)

Pick Your Cord-Cutting Profile

Cable Junkie
I want to get as close to cable as possible, but without the cable headaches.

Broadcast Plus
I want the basic broadcast channels, plus a few cable networks I love.

Sports Fanatic
I want to watch the big game live — sports are the point of television!

Watercooler Popular
I want to stay caught up on the popular shows everyone is talking about.

Babysitter
I want family-friendly offerings to keep the kids entertained.

Cinephile
I really just want to watch movies from the comfort of my couch.

Throwback
Keep your Peak TV... Give me the classics instead.

Around the World
I want access to great international programming.

Empty Wallet
I want my TV to be completely free.


Cable Junkie

Want to get as close to cable as possible, but without the cable headaches? Here are the best options for you:

FuboTV ($55)
FuboTV is the best choice for a cable-esque package when you also want plenty of access to live sports. Fubo has more than 80 channels, including locals, but its main draw is its array of sports offerings. NBC Sports, CBS Sports, Fox Sports 1 and 2, the NFL Network, and more are available in the standard package. Not enough? FuboTV offers a Sports Plus package for an additional $9 a month, as well as other sports-related add-on options. FuboTV streams on Roku, Apple TV, Android TV, Amazon Fire, and Chromecast. (Try FuboTV here.)

Hulu with Live TV ($44.99)
If you'd prefer something a little closer to the TV experience as you might be used to it, Hulu with Live TV offers all the perks of Hulu's streaming library and adds access to over 60 channels that you can watch live through the app. Hulu with Live TV has ESPN, Fox Sports 1, NBC Sports, and other sports-dedicated channels, so that means you can cut the cord without missing a lot of sports content. (Try Hulu here.)

PlayStation Vue ($45-$80)
You don't need a PlayStation to use Vue, which offers a cable-like experience for less money than your cable bill, and you can select from several tiers that provide different channel options, allowing you to pick the package that works best for you. Most local channels are available in all the tiers (depending on your market), and each tier adds more coverage, particularly for sports. There are also several channel add-on options, including a large sports package and FX+. Don't have a PlayStation? Not to worry. Vue is available via Amazon Fire, Roku, Apple TV and iOS devices, Android devices, and through your computer's web browser. (Try PlayStation Vue here.)

YouTube TV ($49.99)
YouTube TV offers more than 60 channels, all of which you can watch live, including Freeform, FX, TBS, and Syfy. The service allows for up to six user accounts, each with its own individual login and cloud DVR, though only three simultaneous streams are allowed at a time. There are some add-ons available, but HBO is not among them. Watching YouTube TV requires devices with Android L or later, iOS 9.1 or later, or a current version of Chrome. You can also watch via Chromecast, Roku, Apple TV, Android TV, and Xbox One. (Try YouTube TV here.)


Broadcast Plus

Want the basic broadcast channels, plus a few cable networks you love? Here are the best options for you:

CBS All-Access ($5.99)
CBS All-Access offers high-profile originals (The Good Fight, Star Trek: Discovery, The Twilight Zone reboot), and it's the only way to stream currently airing CBS programs including NCIS, Survivor, and Blue Bloods. All-Access also lets users stream a number of classic shows that may not be found elsewhere, including Cagney & Lacey, the 1960s Mission: Impossible series, and I Love Lucy, among many others. (Try CBS All Access here.)

Hulu ($5.99)
Hulu's base option is one of the best ways to keep current on TV without a cable package. The service offers next-day access to almost every broadcast network's shows and the chance to watch shows from a variety of cable channels as well, including A&E, Food Network, and FX. You can add on premium cable services like HBO and Showtime for an additional monthly cost, too. Hulu also has movies, classic shows, children's programming, and anime, so there's a little something for everyone here. Ad-supported Hulu will also be available as part of a Disney+ bundle. (Try Hulu here.)

Hulu with Live TV ($44.99)
If you'd prefer something a little closer to the TV experience as you might be used to it, Hulu with Live TV offers all the perks of Hulu's streaming library and adds access to over 60 channels that you can watch live through the app. Hulu with Live TV has ESPN, Fox Sports 1, NBC Sports, and other sports-dedicated channels, so that means you can cut the cord without missing a lot of sports content. (Try Hulu here.)

PlayStation Vue ($45-$80)
You don't need a PlayStation to use Vue, which offers a cable-like experience for less money than your cable bill, and you can select from several tiers that provide different channel options, allowing you to pick the package that works best for you. Most local channels are available in all the tiers (depending on your market), and each tier adds more coverage, particularly for sports. There are also several channel add-on options, including a large sports package and FX+. Don't have a PlayStation? Not to worry. Vue is available via Amazon Fire, Roku, Apple TV and iOS devices, Android devices, and through your computer's web browser. (Try PlayStation Vue here.)

SlingTV Orange & Blue ($25 each, $40 for both)
Sling is perhaps the most direct solution for viewers seeking an à la carte TV experience. The Orange and Blue packages, which boast slightly different channel lineups, can be supplemented with add-ons for an additional monthly cost; add-on options include extra news channels (BBC, HLN), comedy-geared channels (TV Land, MTV), or classic Hollywood programming (TCM, Sundance). A DVR service is available for $5 a month. (Note that some channels, including local ones, may not be available in your area.) Sling is available on the usual streaming boxes and sticks, as well as on Oculus. (Try Sling here.)

YouTube TV ($49.99)
YouTube TV offers more than 60 channels, all of which you can watch live, including Freeform, FX, TBS, and Syfy. The service allows for up to six user accounts, each with its own individual login and cloud DVR, though only three simultaneous streams are allowed at a time. There are some add-ons available, but HBO is not among them. Watching YouTube TV requires devices with Android L or later, iOS 9.1 or later, or a current version of Chrome. You can also watch via Chromecast, Roku, Apple TV, Android TV, and Xbox One. (Try YouTube TV here.)


Sports Fanatic

Want to watch the big game live? Are sports the whole point of television? Here are the best options for you:

Amazon Prime Video ($8.99)
In addition to its vast collection of shows and movies, Amazon also makes available, either included like NFL Thursday Night Football games, or as add-ons, like the NBA League Pass. (Try Amazon Prime Video here.)

ESPN+ ($5)
If you're looking to supplement a sports-light cord-cutting package, ESPN+ is a good choice. The service, available on pretty much every streaming device, offers a selection of live games from the MLB, the NHL, and the MLS (indeed, it's the only way to stream MLS games without cable). Big-ticket events like Grand Slam tennis and UFC bouts are also available. If you want to watch ESPN programming like 30 for 30, ESPN+ has you covered, too. EPSN+ will be available as part of a Disney+ bundle as well. (Try ESPN+ here.)

FuboTV ($55)
FuboTV's biggest draw is its array of sports offerings. NBC Sports, CBS Sports, Fox Sports 1 and 2, the NFL Network, and more are available in the standard package. Not enough? FuboTV offers a Sports Plus package for an additional $9 a month, as well as other sports add-on options. FuboTV streams on Roku, Apple TV, Android TV, Amazon Fire, and Chromecast. (Try FuboTV here.)

Hulu with Live TV ($44.99)
In addition to its streaming library, Hulu's live TV option adds access to over 60 channels you can watch live through the app, including ESPN, Fox Sports 1, NBC Sports, and other sports-dedicated channels, so that means you can cut the cord without missing your football, baseball, wrestling, soccer, basketball, hockey, and more. (Try Hulu here.)

PlayStation Vue ($45-$80)
You don't need a PlayStation to use Vue, and you can select from several tiers that provide different channel options, allowing you to pick the package that works best for you. Most local channels are available in all the tiers (depending on your market), and each tier adds more coverage, particularly for football, baseball, wrestling, soccer, basketball, and hockey. There are also a small number of channel add-on options, including a large sports package. Don't have a PlayStation? Not to worry. Vue is available via Amazon Fire, Roku, Apple TV and iOS devices, Android devices, and through your computer's web browser. (Try PlayStation Vue here.)

SlingTV Orange & Blue ($25 each, $40 for both)Sling is perhaps the most direct solution for viewers seeking an à la carte TV experience. The Orange and Blue packages, which boast slightly different channel lineups, can be supplemented with add-ons for an additional monthly cost; add-on options include extra news channels (BBC, HLN), comedy-geared channels (TV Land, MTV), or classic Hollywood programming (TCM, Sundance). A DVR service is available for $5 a month. (Note that some channels, including local ones, may not be available in your area.) Sling is available on the usual streaming boxes and sticks, as well as on Oculus. (Try Sling here.)


Watercooler Popular

Want to stay caught up on the popular shows everyone is talking about? Here are the best options for you:

Apple TV+ (TBD)
This one's not available yet, but should be considered when planning your cable-free options, considering its top-tier talent roster: Steven Spielberg, J.J. Abrams, Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Aniston, Steve Carell, Chris Evans, Jason Momoa, Octavia Spencer, and more. Here's a cheat sheet about the service.

CBS All-Access ($5.99)
CBS All-Access offers high-profile originals (The Good Fight, Star Trek: Discovery, The Twilight Zone reboot), and it's the only way to stream currently airing CBS programs including NCIS, Survivor, and Blue Bloods. All-Access also lets users stream a number of classic shows that may not be found elsewhere, including Cagney & Lacey, the 1960s Mission: Impossible series, and I Love Lucy, among many others. (Try CBS All Access here.)

Amazon Prime Video ($8.99)
If you already have Amazon Prime, you have access to Prime Video. If you don't want Prime, no worries, because Prime Video is also available as a standalone service. In addition to its excellent original TV series including the Emmy-winning The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Prime Video also offers add-on options, like HBO Now and Showtime, for access to even more popular shows. (Try Amazon Prime Video here.)

Disney+ ($6.99)
Disney's new streaming service launches Nov. 12, and here's what we know: It'll include plenty of movies and TV shows from Disney, Star Wars, Marvel, Pixar, National Geographic, and the Disney Vault. It will also be the streaming home of The Simpsons. Plus, Disney+ will offer a $12.99 option that adds on ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu. (Get more details about Disney+ here.)

HBO Now ($14.99)
If you just want HBO without a cable package, HBO Now will give you all of HBO's content, including access to its buzzy original programming, like Game of Thrones, Barry, and Watchmen, as well as plenty of movies. HBO Now is available via Amazon Fire, Android and Apple TV, Roku, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. (Try HBO Now via Hulu, Amazon, or directly from HBO)

Hulu ($5.99)
Hulu offers next-day access to almost every broadcast network's shows and the chance to watch shows from a variety of cable channels as well, including A&E, Food Network, and FX. You can add on premium cable services like HBO and Showtime for an additional monthly cost, too. Hulu also has movies, classic shows, children's programming, and anime, so there's a little something for everyone here. (Try Hulu here.)

Netflix (Plans start at $8.99)
Netflix boasts a wide catalog of original TV shows including Stranger Things, The Crown, and Big Mouth, and it's also home to the Academy Award-winning film Roma and the meme-ified Bird Box. Unlike many other streamers, Netflix doesn't offer any add-on services, so you're at the mercy of what Netflix buys or produces. Thankfully, the streaming service has invested in producing a plethora of originals. (Try Netflix here.)

PlayStation Vue ($45-$80)
You don't need a PlayStation to use Vue, and you can select from several tiers that provide different channel options, allowing you to pick the package that works best for you. Most local channels are available in all the tiers (depending on your market), and each tier adds more coverage. There are also several channel add-on options, including FX+. Don't have a PlayStation? Not to worry. Vue is available via Amazon Fire, Roku, Apple TV and iOS devices, Android devices, and through your computer's web browser. (Try PlayStation Vue here.)

Showtime ($10.99)
Showtime is available without a cable subscription for $10.99 a month. You'll have streaming access to the channel, including all its movies and original shows, like The Chi, Homeland, and Billions, through your computer, Amazon Fire, Apple TV, Roku, Android TV, and Xbox One. Apple and Android phones can also stream Showtime. (Try Showtime here.)

Starz ($8.99)
If you'd like to check out Outlander, Power, or American Gods, along with a catalog of popular movies, Starz offers a cable-free subscription service for $9 a month. Android and iOS devices have Starz apps, and you can also stream it through Amazon Fire and Xbox One. (Try Starz here.)


Babysitter

Want family-friendly offerings to keep the kids entertained? Here are the best options for you:

Amazon Prime Video ($8.99)
If you already have Amazon Prime, you have access to Prime Video, which features a stock of family programming, including originals (like Tumble Leaf and Creative Galaxy) and imports from other channels (like Bubble Guppies and Dora the Explorer). If you don't want Prime, no worries, because Prime Video is also available as a standalone service. (Try Amazon Prime Video here.)

Disney+ ($6.99)
Disney's new streaming service launches Nov. 12, and here's what we know: It'll include plenty of movies and TV shows from Disney, Star Wars, Marvel, Pixar, National Geographic, and the Disney Vault — and it will not offer any R-rated content, keeping its programming slate family-oriented. Plus, Disney+ will offer a $12.99 option that adds on ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu. (Get more details about Disney+ here.)

FunimationNow (Free, $5.99 or $7.99 montly, or $99.99/year)
If you need dubs instead of subs of the most recent anime, FunimationNow is your pick. Along with simulcast subtitled episodes after they air in Japan, dubbed episodes are available as quickly as two weeks after the episode airs in Japan. This combination makes FunimationNow the best of both worlds when it comes to the sub versus dub debate. The service is available on pretty much every popular streaming device. (Try FunimationNow here.)

HBO Now ($14.99)If you just want HBO without a cable package, HBO Now will give you all of HBO's content, which isn't just for adults; HBO is the home of Sesame Street, Esme and Roy, and family-friendly movies like Despicable Me and Paddington 2. HBO Now is available via Amazon Fire, Android and Apple TV, Roku, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. (Try HBO Now via Hulu, Amazon, or directly from HBO)

Hulu ($5.99)
Hulu offers next-day access to almost every broadcast network's shows and the chance to watch shows from a variety of cable channels as well, including A&E, Food Network, and FX. You can add on premium cable services like HBO and Showtime for an additional monthly cost, too. Hulu also has movies, classic shows, anime, and children's programming like Doc McStuffins and Unikitty! as well as a rotating slate of family-friendly movies. (Try Hulu here.)

Netflix (Plans start at $8.99)
Netflix boasts a wide catalog of original kid-friendly movies and TV shows, including Ask the Storybots, Beat Bugs, and Puffin Rock. It also features a rotating slate of family-friendly movies and shows from other production companies. Unlike many other streamers, Netflix doesn't offer any add-on services, so you're at the mercy of what Netflix buys or produces. Thankfully, the streaming service has invested in producing a plethora of originals. (Try Netflix here.)

PlayStation Vue ($45-$80)
You don't need a PlayStation to use Vue, which offers a cable-like experience for less money than your cable bill, and you can select from several tiers that provide different channel options, many of which are packed with family-friendly options. Disney Channel (for now; Disney's service may change things) and Cartoon Network are just a few of the options for keeping kids happy. Don't have a PlayStation? Not to worry. Vue is available via Amazon Fire, Roku, Apple TV and iOS devices, Android devices, and through your computer's web browser. (Try PlayStation Vue here.)

SlingTV Orange & Blue ($25 each, $40 for both)
Sling is perhaps the most direct solution for viewers seeking an à la carte TV experience. The Orange and Blue packages, which boast slightly different channel lineups, can be supplemented with add-ons for an additional monthly cost, including the Kids Extra package that features Disney XD, Disney Junior (for now; Disney's service may change things), Baby TV, Nick Jr., and Teen Nick. Hopster, for preschoolers, is available for $5 a month. (Try Sling here.)

WarnerMedia's HBO Max (Details TBA)
WarnerMedia, the conglomerate that resulted from the merger of AT&T and Warner Bros., will launch its HBO Max streaming service in spring 2020, offering content from across the company's portfolio — including kid-friendly brands like Looney Tunes, DC Comics, and Sesame Street. Warner Bros. has a deep archive of movies and TV shows that will find their way to the service, including Friends and Casablanca. The service is expected to be tiered, with one placing an emphasis on movies, another with blockbusters and original programming, and a third tier that combines the first two tiers and includes the Warner Bros. catalog. (Get more details on WarnerMedia's HBO Max here.)


Cinephile

Do you really just want to watch movies from the comfort of your couch? Here are the best options for you:

Amazon Prime Video ($8.99)
If you already have Amazon Prime, you have access to Prime Video. If you don't want Prime, no worries, because Prime Video is also available as a standalone service, and it offers award-winning original movies like Manchester By the Sea and The Big Sick, as well as a catalog of older movies, and a rotating slate of blockbusters from other creators. Prime Video also offers add-on options, like HBO Now, Showtime, and Acorn. (Try Amazon Prime Video here.)

Criterion Channel ($10.99)
A film lover's dream, the Criterion Channel has more than 1,000 classic (and sometimes not-so-classic) movies from all over the world. The company licenses other films outside its own catalog for at least 90 days, offering a constantly refreshed slate of movies to watch. The Criterion Channel is available on your computer and on Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Roku, iOS, Android, and Android TVs. (Try the Criterion Channel here.)

Disney+ ($6.99)
Disney's new streaming service launches Nov. 12, and here's what we know: It'll include plenty of movies and TV shows from Disney, Star Wars, Marvel, Pixar, National Geographic, and the Disney Vault. Plus, Disney+ will offer a $12.99 option that adds on ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu. (Get more details about Disney+ here.)

HBO Now ($14.99)
If you just want HBO without a cable package, HBO Now will give you all of HBO's content, including access to new movies (in constant rotation) and original HBO films like Leaving Neverland and The Wizard of Lies. HBO Now is available via Amazon Fire, Android and Apple TV, Roku, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. (Try HBO Now via Hulu, Amazon, or directly from HBO)

Hulu ($5.99)
Hulu offers next-day access to almost every broadcast network's shows, but Hulu also has a respectable trove of movies, from exclusive-to-Hulu flicks like Apollo 11 and Vice to originals such as the infamous Fyre Fraud. (Try Hulu here.)

Netflix (Plans start at $8.99)
Netflix houses a growing catalog of original movies, including the Academy Award-winning film Roma and the meme-ified Bird Box. The streaming service also features a rotating slate of popular movies from other producers. Unlike many other streamers, Netflix doesn't offer any add-on services, so you're at the mercy of what Netflix buys or produces. Thankfully, the streaming service has invested in producing a plethora of originals. (Try Netflix here.)

Pluto TV (Free)
Pluto TV offers a plethora of movies and classic TV options in the curated channels. Ads, however, can occur at awkward times in movies, making the experience a little like watching TV the old-fashioned way. You can watch Pluto on your computer, iOS, and Android devices, along with Roku, Amazon Fire, Chromecast, and PlayStation 4 consoles. Not all channels are available on all devices. (Try Pluto TV here.)

Showtime ($10.99)
Showtime is available without a cable subscription for $10.99 a month. You'll have streaming access to the channel's original shows, like The Chi, Homeland, and Billions, as well as an impressive slate of films, from dramas like Ali, comedies likeA Fish Called Wanda, and a diverse lineup of documentaries. Watch through your computer, Amazon Fire, Apple TV, Roku, Android TV, and Xbox One or Apple and Android phones. (Try Showtime here.)

Starz ($8.99)
In addition to hit shows like Outlander, Power, or American Gods, Starz's subscription service offers access to movies like Juice, Harlem Nights, and Clockers. Android and iOS devices have Starz apps, and you can also stream it through Amazon Fire and Xbox One. (Try Starz here.)

WarnerMedia's HBO Max (Details TBA)
WarnerMedia, the conglomerate that resulted from the merger of AT&T and Warner Bros., will launch its HBO Max streaming service in spring 2020, offering content from across the company's portfolio. Warner Bros. has a deep archive of movies that will find their way to the service, including Aquaman and Casablanca. The service is expected to be tiered, with one placing an emphasis on movies, another with blockbusters and original programming, and a third tier that combines the first two tiers and includes the Warner Bros. catalog. (Get more details on WarnerMedia's HBO Max here.)


Throwback

Are you more interested in the Golden Age of Hollywood than Peak TV? Do you just want to curl up with the classics? Here are the best options for you:

CBS All-Access ($5.99)
CBS All-Access offers high-profile originals (The Good Fight, Star Trek: Discovery, The Twilight Zone reboot), and it's the only way to stream currently airing CBS programs including NCIS, Survivor, and Blue Bloods. All-Access also lets users stream a number of classic shows that may not be found elsewhere, including Cagney & Lacey, the 1960s Mission: Impossible series, and I Love Lucy, among many others. (Try CBS All Access here.)

BritBox ($6.99)
A joint venture between the BBC and ITV, BritBox has hours upon hours of British TV programming, including popular classics like Blackadder, Fawlty Towers, and episodes from the first seven series of Doctor Who. You can stream BritBox on your computer, Roku, Chromecast, Apple TV and Android and iOS devices. (Try Britbox here.)

Disney+ ($6.99)
Disney's new streaming service launches Nov. 12, and here's what we know: It'll include plenty of movies and TV shows produced by Disney, Star Wars, Marvel, Pixar, and National Geographic, as well as tons of beloved classics from the Disney Vault, so you can relive your youth. Plus, Disney+ will offer a $12.99 option that adds on ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu. (Get more details about Disney+ here.)

Hulu ($5.99)
Hulu offers next-day access to almost every broadcast network's shows and the chance to watch shows from a variety of cable channels as well, including A&E, Food Network, and FX. You can add on premium cable services like HBO and Showtime for an additional monthly cost, too. Hulu also has movies, classic shows, children's programming, and anime, so there's a little something for everyone here. (Try Hulu here.)

Netflix (Plans start at $8.99)
Netflix has new hits including Stranger Things, The Crown, and Big Mouth, but the streaming service also boasts a whole catalog of classic shows like The Andy Griffith Show and films like The GraduateandShe's Gotta Have It. Plus, the lineup gets updated every month. (Try Netflix here.)

WarnerMedia's HBO Max (Details TBA)
WarnerMedia, the conglomerate that resulted from the merger of AT&T and Warner Bros., will launch its HBO Max streaming service in spring 2020, offering content from across the company's portfolio. Warner Bros. has a deep archive of movies and TV shows that will find their way to the service, including Friends and Casablanca. The service is expected to be tiered, with one placing an emphasis on movies, another with blockbusters and original programming, and a third tier that combines the first two tiers and includes the Warner Bros. catalog. (Get more details on WarnerMedia's HBO Max here.)


Around the World

Do you mainly want access to great international programming? Here are the best options for you:

Amazon Prime Video ($8.99)
If you already have Amazon Prime, you have access to Prime Video. If you don't want Amazon Prime, no worries, because Prime Video is also available as a standalone service. In addition to its award-winning original shows and movies, its catalog of older movies, and its rotating slate of blockbusters, Prime Video also offers a range of foreign films and programs, including from South Korea, Norway, France, Israel, India, Spain, and more. Prime Video also offers Acorn TV as an add-on option. (Try Amazon Prime Video here.)

Acorn TV ($5.99)
Acorn is a common add-on in a number of services, but it's also possible to subscribe to it as a standalone service. Acorn hosts programming mainly from the U.K., with shows and movies from Ireland, Canada, and Australia also available. So if you have a hankering for Midsomer Murders, Agatha Christie's Poirot,Detectorists, and more, Acorn can help you satisfy it. Look for the app on Amazon Fire, Apple TV, and Roku. (Try Acorn TV here.)

BritBox ($6.99)
A joint venture between the BBC and ITV, BritBox has hours upon hours of British TV programming, including popular classics like Blackadder, Fawlty Towers, and episodes from the first seven series of Doctor Who. Currently airing shows, including EastEndersand Coronation Street, get new episodes not long after they air in England. You can stream BritBox on your computer, Roku, Chromecast, Apple TV, and Android and iOS devices. (Try Britbox here.)

Crunchyroll (Free or $7.99)
Crunchyroll is one of the few legal streaming options for anime and Japanese dramas (but mostly anime) on the web. Paid members can get new subtitled episodes of a show roughly an hour after they air in Japan, making it one of the best ways to keep up with the medium. There's also a decent collection of classic shows available as well. Crunchyroll is available on almost every popular streaming device. (Try Crunchyroll here.)

FunimationNow (Free, $5.99 or $7.99 montly, or $99.99/year)
If you need dubs instead of subs of the most recent anime, FunimationNow is your pick. Along with simulcast subtitled episodes after they air in Japan, dubbed episodes are available as quickly as two weeks after the episode airs in Japan. This combination makes FunimationNow the best of both worlds when it comes to the sub versus dub debate. The service is available on pretty much every popular streaming device. (Try FunimationNow here.)

Netflix (Plans start at $8.99)
Netflix boasts a wide catalog of original TV shows including Stranger Things, The Crown, and Big Mouth, and it's also home a world of international titles too, including Delhi Crimes from India, La Casa de Las Flores from Mexico, and Italy's Gomorrah. (Try Netflix here.)


Empty Wallet

Do want your TV service to be completely free? Here are the best options for you:

Indoor antenna (One-time cost for equipment)
If you don't want to pay a monthly fee to anyone, consider an indoor antenna. Yes, it's like returning to the old days of television, but everything old is new again. Indoor antennas allow you to watch local networks and other channels transmitted over the air, which means you won't miss out on big sporting events or local news. Like the rabbit ears of old, however, picture quality and overall reception may be spotty from location to location. Each TV in your home will need its own antenna, too. Prices vary on the devices, but you can pick one up starting at $10. (See CNET's guide to the best indoor antennas here.)

Pluto TV (Free)
You don't get much cheaper than free, and Pluto TV is very free. It has more than 100 channels, most of them custom to Pluto, though a few channels you're familiar with, like CBS News and Fox Sports, are available on the service, too. Pluto also offers a plethora of movies and classic TV options in the curated channels. Ads, however, can occur at awkward times in movies, making the experience a little like watching TV the old-fashioned way. You can watch Pluto on your computer, iOS, and Android devices, along with Roku, Amazon Fire, Chromecast, and PlayStation 4 consoles. Not all channels are available on all devices. (Try Pluto TV here.)

(Disclosure: TV Guide is owned by CBS Interactive, a division of CBS Corporation.)

Editor: Malcolm Venable
Reporting: Noel Kirkpatrick

Creative: Robert Rodriguez