It is with heavy hearts that we mourn the loss of Teen Wolf, which passed away Sunday, Sept. 24 of natural causes. The supernatural drama series was 6, living one season beyond what was initially expected by series creator Jeff Davis.

Adapted from the Michael J. Fox movie of the same name, Teen Wolf was MTV's first truly successful original scripted series. Born June 5, 2011 in Beacon Hills, Calif., the series has the curious distinction of also being the network's only remaining scripted series as of this writing, since we refuse to acknowledge the existence of Scream as being relevant given the nature of its shortened and rebooted third season. And because the network is pivoting back toward its former bread and butter, reality TV.

Although it grew up in a crowded, well-worn home that was populated by many other versions of werewolves, vampires and creepy things that go bump in the night, it managed to chart a unique course by sticking to its own powerful motto: be your own anchor. What started out as a series about two apparently dorky best friends (Tyler Posey and Dylan O'Brien) attempting to navigate high school while also saving their town from supernatural threats, Teen Wolf evolved into an ensemble series about growing up and coming into one's own. And bromance. Always bromance. Never forget the bromance.


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Teen Wolf didn't have the easiest life, though. Over the course of six seasons, the series was plagued by frequent cast turnover and forced its high school-aged protagonists to survive the fierce wit of the deliciously wicked Peter Hale (Ian Bohen); something called a kanima; a geriatric goo monster; a darach and a pack of alpha werewolves; a ridiculously convoluted death pool we still don't fully understand; Theo, whom Price Peterson trusts; and the Wild Hunt. They even faced off against one of their own, when the writers finally realized O'Brien was infinitely more talented than they first understood him to be.

The MTV series will be remembered for launching the career of O'Brien; for making Posey more than just That Kid from Maid in Manhattan, a Film Starring Jennifer Lopez; and Price's excellent photo recaps. Loved ones recall the show fondly, reminiscing on its sense of humor, big heart, countless shirtless locker room scenes, and frequently terrifying cold opens. It proved that werewolf hobos could be sexy, parents should sometimes be allowed to know the truth about what's happening in their teens' lives, and it's possible to burn off all your clothes into jorts.

The well-loved series, which won no major awards except for the ones given out by our hearts, also had a deep interest in lacrosse, spending several seasons attempting to convince its loved ones that it was a sport that anyone cared about... and by the end, maybe we all did.

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Of course, the series wasn't always perfect; it spent several seasons in fandom prison for its poor treatment of several female characters, two of whom just disappeared between seasons. Still, Teen Wolf was original and ambitious in its overarching narratives, and it was admired for its attempts to break new ground in a genre that is now well beyond the point of saturation.

It was preceded in death by several brothers and sisters, including Awkward. (2011-2016); the delightful and surprisingly emotional comedy Faking It (2014-2016); the empowering college-set drama Sweet/Vicious (2016-2017); the altogether messy Finding Carter (2014-2015); and the instantly forgettable I Just Want My Pants Back (2011-2012), The Inbetweeners (2012-2012), Zach Stone Is Gonna Be Famous (2013-2013), Happyland (2014-2014), and Mary + Jane (2016-2016). Distant step-cousin The Shannara Chronicles was shipped off to boarding school, and was never heard from again.

Teen Wolf is survived by Dylan O'Brien's career, Tyler Posey's tattoos, Tyler Hoechlin's beard, and thousands upon thousands of NSFW chapters of fanfiction.

Rest in peace, Teen Wolf. We miss you already.