Marcia Clark, who was the lead attorney on the O.J. Simpson murder case, says she doesn't believe there was anything she could have done to get the jury to convict the star athlete.

During a sit-down with Dateline that aired Sunday, the former Los Angeles County prosecutor said the not guilty verdict was "physically painful" for her, but that Simpson's acquittal was inevitable. "At the end of the day, there was no way to reach that jury," Clark said. "There was no way to make them believe. There really wasn't."

Clark also revealed that she was completely against Simpson trying on the gloves found by police in court. "That was not my call," Clark admitted. "I did not want him to try on the evidence gloves. I never did. That was [co-council Chris Darden's] call.

"I was miserable from the moment that Chris said 'I'm doing this,'" she continued. "I never expected anything good to come of it."

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However, Clark never blamed Darden for the verdict. "If that lost the case for us, we were never going to win anyway," she said.

After the trial ended in 1995, Clark, who was particularly vilified by the media throughout the course of the trial, decided to resign from her position at the D.A.'s office.

"I was exhausted. I was physically and emotionally drained," Clark recalled. "It was a tough year and a half of feeling kind of battered on all sides and I really just needed to recover. And then I just kind of felt like, 'I don't need to do this anymore.'"

Though Clark had no concept of what she would do next at the time, she eventually returned to her childhood dream of becoming a crime writer. "I really wanted to do that, but I never had faith that I could make a living at it, so I didn't try," Clark said.

Clark has now published four novels, with her fifth due out in May.

Watch The People v. O.J. Simpson star Sarah Paulson discuss playing Marcia Clark in the video below.