After several weeks off, Saturday Night Live returned this week with host Louis C.K. and musical guest The Chainsmokers. Although we've seen several items come and go from our newsfeeds that fans might've liked to see covered by the show, SNL didn't waste much time getting to the nitty gritty of the latest points of intrigue.

To kick things off on a cheeky, but also kinda sad, note, Alec Baldwin returned as Donald Trump in one of his celebratory visits to the small towns that bolstered his run to talk to his people about his efforts to restore "Jobs Jobs Jobs" and explained his strategy like so: "In Trump's America, men work in two places: coal mines and Goldman Sachs." Sounds about right.

Fielding questions from the crowd, he also touched on the GOP's failed first effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, allowing Speaker Paul Ryan to shoulder the blame for that one. "I did everything I could. I made phone calls, I jumped into a truck, I posed for pictures. I went 'honk, honk!'" And then he touched on his intention to "junk" everything from healthcare to water quality regulations to federally sponsored drug rehab programs -- all of which were welcome news to the ones who need them the most.

"That's why I came here. You people stand by me no matter what. It's like you found a finger in your chili but you still eat the chili because you told everyone how much you love the chili. It's tremendous."

<em>Saturday Night Live</em>, NBCSaturday Night Live, NBC



Meanwhile, Louis C.K.'s opening monologue was certainly political -- but in an entirely different way than one might've expected. Leading off with a simple "why did the chicken cross the road" paradigm, the comedian launched into a cheeky commentary on the spate of American racism, personifying animals and even quipping about privilege in the motel-hotel customer service dynamic.

Wait for the giraffe joke.

Louis C.K. didn't completely separate himself from the current political climate, however. In this "Thank You, Scott" skit, the comedian dug into so-called "slacktivism" or "clicktivism" whereby couch-dwellers can create an air of involvement with the press of the share button.

Making a difference in the world from the comfort of your toilet throne? Eh, not so much.

Speaking of phoned-in activism, the show also harped on the politically tone-deaf Pepsi commercial that unwisely featured Kendall Jenner and her can of cola as the bridge between protesters and police by taking a look at exactly how the immediately berated ad came together. The excited ingenue directing the shoot is thoroughly informed by his gaggle of phone-a-friends that this is not the right approach to selling soda, but by then it's too late. Kendall Jenner's called out from her trailer, while on the phone with Khloe in her ice blonde wig, and explains, "I gotta go I'm on the set of my Pepsi commercial. ... I stop the police from shooting black people by handing them a Pepsi. I know, it's cute, right?"

Head meet desk forever.