It was a move that surprised absolutely no one — except Sam Solovey. On last night's Apprentice, Donald Trump finally canned Sam. From Day 1, the 27-year-old Internet entrepreneur from Chevy Chase, Md., created static with his teammates. But if you think the experience has humbled him, think again.

TV Guide Online: Why was it such a struggle for you to stay on the show?
Sam Solovey:
I have a strong personality. I have a lot of big ideas. I was thinking out of the box, which I do in business, and it's been successful for me. And it didn't work in this environment. I may have been a threat. A lot of people in the working world think one-dimensionally, and I don't, and that often throws people off.

TVGO: Do you think trying to sell a cup of lemonade for $1,000 hurt you?
Solovey:
I was actually very close to getting that sale. I'd be willing to go back to those people today and present them with the same offer, and I think they would take it.

TVGO: What about when you fell asleep working at the table and curled up on the floor?
Solovey:
At the table, I didn't realize I had dozed off. But I was not asleep on the floor. I felt awful because my team members ate all the lunch. I hadn't eaten for 36 hours.

TVGO: How long did you wait for someone to come greet you at the door after you returned from your second trip to the chopping block?
Solovey:
About an hour and 45 minutes. Kristi finally came along and said "Where's Sam?" I was curious to know how long it would take for someone to recognize that I was there. It was an experiment in finding out how self-consumed the other contestants were.

TVGO: Was Trump correct when he said everyone on your team hated you?
Solovey:
I don't think everyone disliked me. My teammates were very uncomfortable with my style. That's a style that has worked for me. I rocked the traditional boat, and I'll keep on rocking the boat.

TVGO: Why do you think the women are doing so much better than the men?
Solovey:
Smart, attractive women have an edge over men in a lot of cases. I'm just waiting for a female [U.S.] president and more women to be executives of companies. Because once they get there, men are going to be in big trouble. But women have their shortcomings, too. They're very catty.

TVGO: What's next for you?
Solovey:
I would love to have a TV talk show like Dr. Phil or Ellen DeGeneres. But I have no delusions of grandeur. It's 11 minutes and counting for me on the 15-minutes-of-fame scale.