On Thursday's episode of The Apprentice, Omarosa Manigault-Stallworth was evicted from Trump Plaza and immediately took up residence inside reality television's Hall of Shame on You, Girlfriend! There, alongside fellow überbitches Jerri Manthey, Camille McDonald and Toni Ferrari, the 29-year-old political consultant (and former Clinton appointee) was granted one phone call — and wouldn't you know it, she used it to call TV Guide Online! Be afraid... be very afraid, folks (we sure were). We've chummed the waters and reeled in the nastiest corporate shark since Leona Helmsley.

TV Guide Online: How's your head?
Omarosa:
Thanks for asking. I really [suffered] a lot because I didn't follow the doctor's [orders], which was to take off a week and rest... I wasn't given an opportunity to do that. A lot of what you saw last [Thursday] night was relief, because I could now go take care of myself physically.

TVGO: You went to the hospital?
Omarosa:
Oh, gosh, yes. Eighteen hours in the emergency room. I went to a neurologist who specializes in severe head trauma and concussion. I also had an MRI done that showed the trauma.

TVGO: I have to say, it didn't look like you were hurt too badly.
Omarosa:
Did they ever show the chunk actually hitting me? Because if they did, my attorney would like to see that. [Laughs]

TVGO: I'm fairly certain...
Omarosa:
I have it on TiVO, and they never showed it, actually.

TVGO: They showed the "debris" falling, but it's not like you fell to the floor or anything. You kind of looked up and smiled, like, "What was that?" I think that's why your teammates probably felt you were exaggerating the injury.
Omarosa: I've been trained to be a strong woman, and I don't really break down unless something is really, really going to cause me to pass out...

TVGO: You insinuated on the Today show that had you been wearing a hard hat this may not have happened.
Omarosa: I don't know much about construction, but I do know one thing: You're supposed to have a hard hat in an environment like that.

TVGO: Are you contemplating a lawsuit?
Omarosa:
This happened in September. If I were, I think it would have happened by now.

TVGO: Well, you just mentioned something about having an attorney...
Omarosa:
I'm a smart girl. There's contracts and this is a business — of course I have representation. I'm a businesswoman, sir.

TVGO: Did you ever consider a lawsuit, ma'am?
Omarosa:
I can't answer that. [Laughs] You're good. I like that. I like that for you.

TVGO: Thanks. Anyway, you suggested race played a role in the reaction you were getting from your teammates...
Omarosa:
That was a small fraction of it. The largest fraction was that I was truly the strongest player in the game. Smart. Articulate. Logical. I had common sense. And Trump liked my spunk.

TVGO: Did the race card come into it...
Omarosa:
First of all, I don't like the term "race card." That would insinuate that there was a game being played. My life is not a game.

TVGO: What about the whole "Pot calling the kettle black" thing. Do you really see that as a racial slur?
Omarosa:
That was editing... I mean, come on. I'm an educated woman; I know what that saying means.

TVGO: If race was such a factor, how do you explain the warm reception Kwame's getting? Everyone seems to be embracing him.
Omarosa:
I don't know that he is being embraced. I don't know that his portrayal is any better than mine. They portray him as laid-back and not contributing very much and being the worst project manager and all those other things... And you can't compare me and Kwame. We're different people.

TVGO: After watching the show, do you see why people might have a negative opinion of you?
Omarosa:
Help me understand that... Have you once seen me raise my voice on the show? Have you ever seen me call a girl a bitch? Never once. Have you ever seen me physically attack any of those girls like they did me? Ever? Did you ever see any aggression from me whatsoever? When Ereka was jumping around in the airport waving her hands in my face, I stayed cool, calm and collected. So, no, I am a bit confused as to why I'm the villain when these women have physically attacked me, called my character into question, called me everything but a child of God. [Laughs] All they showed was me grimacing and frowning. You have to acknowledge editing... I will say one thing: [The Apprentice] is reality TV, but unfortunately it's not my reality.

TVGO: So, who is the real Omarosa?
Omarosa:
The real Omarosa is a bright, intelligent, smart woman who is very much engaged in her community, concerned about the youth, concerned about her family, involved in the political process, working as an entrepreneur, running two businesses... writing books to empower women in corporate America... She is a woman who, if you meet her on the street, she'd give you the last dollar in her pocket.

TVGO: If you had to point out one weakness in you, what would it be?
Omarosa:
My inability to say no. I tend to compromise a lot... I could be a little more sensitive to interpersonal dynamics, too.

TVGO: Did it impress you that Heidi was able to carry on in the wake of her mother's cancer diagnosis?
Omarosa:
Yes, particularly since her mother was only a half-hour away from her. But I don't want to comment about that because to each his own... I really feel for her.

TVGO: If the shoe were on your foot, do you think you would have stayed in the game?
Omarosa:
I don't want to respond to that. I'm sorry.

TVGO: Any last thoughts?
Omarosa:
I want to impress on people that I come out of Washington, D.C., which is probably the toughest environment in this country — even more so than New York. I have developed mechanisms to provide successes for myself, and some of those things may not be perceived as nice or sweet, but they have worked for me. I have been a successful woman. I am a good person and a caring person. And at the end of the day, I'm very proud at how long I lasted. It took some intelligence and some finessing to last nine weeks on the show, particularly when I was the biggest target.