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Exclusive: Charlie Sheen Pursues a Return to Two and a Half Men

Charlie Sheen

As Anger Management nears the end of its 100-episode order, Charlie Sheen is bracing for what may be the FX sitcom's wrap. Simultaneously, his previous series, Two and a Half Men, is also about to end — and Sheen would like to be a part of that send-off.

Sheen tells TV Guide Magazine that he has approached Two and a Half Men with an idea about how he could make a return to the sitcom. "I've reached out to them and they've reached back," he says. "We're trying to figure out what makes the most sense. If they figure it out like I've presented it to them and they want to include me in some final send-off, I'm available and I'm showing up early. If not, it's on them."

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New Season Reviews: Gotham, Scorpion, Forever, Sleepy Hollow

Katharine McPhee, Elyse Gabel

Happens all the time in the Bat-verse: The bad guys get all the best material. And so it was in the beginning, or at least in the origin story as presented by Fox's stylish, vividly hardboiled Gotham (8/7c), an exercise in pulp-noir chic that, to be enjoyed properly, should be considered more Dick Tracy than Batman in approach.

As Robin might proclaim, if he were around (which he isn't): Holy corruption! The sordid Gotham City on display here reflects executive producer Bruno Heller's time spent on HBO's Rome rather than his sunnier stint with The Mentalist. This city of menace boasts a retro sheen cluttered with jarring contemporary details, projecting what's intended as an out-of-time (or timeless) quality to frame this iconic story. You know how it goes: Young Bruce Wayne (David Mazouz of Touch) is orphaned when his wealthy parents are murdered in a back-alley robbery, inspiring a lifetime devoted to vanquishing Gotham's most-wanted goons.

But that's another tale for another time, because the focus of Gotham is on clench-jawed, strait-arrow Detective (future Commissioner) James Gordon, played with a pugnacious dour solemnity by Ben McKenzie. read more

As the Fall Season Begins, Will 4 Remain TV's Magic Number?

Lost, Friends

As the official 2014-2015 TV season kicks off on Monday, Sept. 22, we're about to find out whether TV's unofficial "Rule of 4" will strike again.

What's the "Rule of 4"? Quite simply, in the past few decades, years that ended in "4" have turned out to be game-changing seasons in network TV. In 1984, The Cosby Show premiered and immediately revived a moribund NBC, as well as the entire sitcom genre.

By 1994, NBC was struggling once again — until Friends and ER came along and made the Peacock Network an unstoppable force for the rest of the decade. By 2004, it was ABC on the ropes, until Lost and Desperate Housewives debuted and turned that network around.

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Ask Matt: Shondaland Thursday, Madam Secretary vs. Race, Superheroes, Outlander and More

How to Get Away With Murder

Send questions and comments to askmatt@tvguidemagazine.com and follow me on Twitter!

Question: I'm wondering what you think about the scheduling of ABC's Thursday night programming. I don't even KNOW if there's a Family Hour any more, but it seems to me that Scandal is pretty heavy on the sex and violence and may not work so well at the 8 pm (Central) hour. Do you see ABC getting complaints about it and possibly switching Scandal and How To Get Away With Murder? — Jan

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James Spader Previews The Blacklist's Intense Second Season

James Spader

The adventures of James Spader's jaunty criminal turncoat Red Reddington continue with federal agent Elizabeth Keen (Megan Boone) digging deeper into her husband's villainous betrayals, baddie Berlin (Peter Stormare) still at large, and the rest of us wondering if — and how — Red and Lizzie are related. Here, Spader assesses the situation and (of course) dodges all spoilers concerning Season 2 of The Blacklist.

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The Big Bang Theory's Johnny Galecki Talks Season 8 Changes, Conflicts and Wedding Plans

Johnny Galecki

All aboard! The Big Bang Theory hits the road in Season 8 — but not for long after Sheldon's (Jim Parsons) 45-day cross-country train ride goes off the rails. While on a mission to find himself, the socially awkward genius actually finds himself trapped in Kingman, Arizona, with all his belongings stolen. He calls roommate Leonard (Johnny Galecki) and girlfriend Amy (Mayim Bialik) for help. "Sheldon can certainly still ruin Leonard's day," Galecki says with a laugh. "But there's a degree of fatherly patience that Leonard has with Sheldon that I find touching."

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Weekend TV: Madam Secretary Joins The Good Wife

Madam Secretary

Many observers will try to compare Elizabeth McCord, the fictional Madam Secretary (of State) winningly played by Téa Leoni, to Hillary Clinton — given the high-profile government cabinet position, and the hair color, and a Benghazi-like crisis by the second episode. But the real comparison to be made is with the show's Sunday night companion piece on CBS: The Good Wife, and that's where this well-meaning and generally entertaining Madam comes up a bit short.

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Once Upon a Time Gets Frozen When Anna and Elsa Visit Storybrooke

Elizabeth Lail, Georgina Haig

Let it go? They just couldn't. When Once Upon a Time creators Eddy Kitsis and Adam Horowitz went with their families to see Frozen last fall, they so... read more

Aubrey Plaza to Voice Grumpy Cat in Lifetime Movie

Grumpy Cat

Lifetime has found the voice of Grumpy Cat: Parks and Recreation star Aubrey Plaza.

It won't be much of a stretch for Plaza, who... read more

New Season Reviews: Red Band Society, Mysteries of Laura

Nolan Sotillo, Charlie Rowe

One of the trickier balancing acts of the season is being performed by Fox's Red Band Society (Wednesday, 9/8c), which aims to be a feel-good show about kids who feel bad. As in indefinite-hospital-stay bad. Amputation bad. Eating disorder, heart disease and cancer bad.

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