Matt Roush


Weekend TV: A New Doctor Who, Intruders, Smashing Ray Donovan

Peter Capaldi

"How do we change him back?"

Such impulsive words, which "Impossible Girl" companion Clara will eventually be forced to swallow as she, and we, learn to adjust to yet another fabulous new Doctor, the 12th in his incredible line. As Doctor Who devotees know, change is inevitable in the world of a Time Lord, and each regeneration brings a new personality and energy to the 50-year-old fantasy franchise.

read more

Thursday TV: Rectify Finale, Simpsons Marathon

Rectify

The upcoming fall season will be lucky to generate even a fraction as many hits as this unusually busy TV summer produced, a list of keepers that includes Outlander, The Strain, The Knick, The Last Ship, Undateable, to name just a few. (Even something as underwhelming as AMC's Halt and Catch Fire, which didn't, has been renewed by its increasingly desperate network, and I'm hoping for good news about the future of WGN America's Manhattan and WE's The Divide.)

read more

Ask Matt: Robin Williams, Playing Approval Matrix, Comics and Arrow, and More

Robin Williams, Sarah Michelle Gellar

Send questions and comments to askmatt@tvguidemagazine.com and follow me on Twitter!

Question: With the passing of the legendary TV talents Robin Williams and James Garner, don't you think it would be remiss if the upcoming Emmys didn't do a clips tribute to both of them? Awards shows have an unfortunate habit of dedicating chunks of time to a theme or subject that either makes no sense or ends up really boring. But these two gentlemen, who broke character boundaries and were excellent actors outside their niche personas, deserve special recognition. I just hope the producers of that upcoming show have the smarts to do something special, outside of the "In Memoriam" roll call. Your thoughts? — Karen

read more

Legends Review: All About the Bean

Sean Bean

Unlike poor Ned Stark, whom he played in Game of Thrones' first season, Sean Bean won't be losing his head anytime soon as Martin Odum, the rugged chameleon hero of TNT's Legends (Wednesday, 9/8c). Losing his mind, however, might be an occupational hazard.

The best parts of this otherwise disappointingly generic spy thriller depict Bean burrowing into Martin's psyche as a (what else, and wait for it) legendary FBI deep-cover operative, who commits so fully to his carefully manufactured false identities, or "legends," that he signs alimony checks with his alias's name. His unsteady sense of self only gets more confused when a hooded stranger warns him that Martin isn't even really Martin, that "everything about him is fake."

Yes, in case you haven't guessed, this special agent is apparently Bourne again, and if Legends itself falls short of instant-icon status (despite producers with Homeland and 24 among their credits), it's no fault of Bean's, who is riveting as he occasionally morphs into character before his colleagues' amazed eyes.

read more

Ask Matt: Glee, Good Wife, Person of Interest, Emmys and Law & Order

Lea Michele

Send questions and comments to askmatt@tvguidemagazine.com and follow me on Twitter!

Question: I am really disappointed that Glee is returning to McKinley and that they are adding more characters to fill out their already shortened final season. The last few seasons of Glee have been less than stellar, but the last handful of episodes set in New York were awesome. Give me New York and throw McKinley away for good. Even with the cliché that was Rachel going from student to Broadway star to TV star almost overnight, I enjoyed watching the more adult struggles of these characters. Now I feel betrayed, like someone dangled the proverbial carrot and then took it away. With 12 episodes left, I want them to focus on the original glee-clubbers following their dreams into the adult world. Sigh. Is this a thing with Ryan Murphy, where his shows start strong for a few seasons and then implode at the end? I hated the last few seasons of Nip/Tuck. — Olivia

read more

Weekend Review: The Knick, Outlander

Caitriona Balfe, Sam Heughan

Cinemax, the scruffy bastard stepchild of HBO, is the perfect home for Steven Soderbergh's harrowing hospital melodrama The Knick (Friday, 10/9c), which depicts 1900s New York City as a vivid Dickensian nightmare. Though described by the series' severely flawed doctor hero John Thackery (a ravaged and mustachioed Clive Owen) as "a time of endless possibility," this Age of Progress has its limitations, with primitive ...
read more

Ask Matt: Outlander, Orange and Emmys, Shonda Times Three, and More

Caitriona Balfe, Sam Heughan

Send questions and comments to askmatt@tvguidemagazine.com and follow me on Twitter!

Question: I was wondering if you've had a chance to preview the Outlander series, based on the books by Diana Gabaldon. I'm a big fan of the books and I'm hoping that the series will be faithful to the story. Do you have any insight you could share? - Elizabeth

read more

Thursday Review: SundanceTV's The Honorable Woman and Rectify

Maggie Gyllenhaal

If SundanceTV's The Honorable Woman were any timelier in its geopolitical drama, most specifically of the Israeli-Palestinian variety, it would bleed newsprint. But it's the emotional intricacies of this rewardingly complex and brilliantly acted eight-part miniseries (Thursdays, 10/9c) that resonate timelessly, grounded by Maggie Gyllenhaal's impassioned, extraordinary performance as the title character, idealistic Anglo-Israeli philanthropist and newly appointed Baroness Nessa Stein.

Gyllenhaal brings layers upon layers of crisp elegance, prideful steel, profound sorrow and ultimately an aching vulnerability to Nessa. We share her angry despair as her lofty goals — most notably, wiring the West Bank in a lucrative but controversial contract for high-speed Internet as part of her family foundation's crusade for reconciliation — are steadily shattered by shady compromises and sinister secrets stemming from her mysterious abduction in Gaza eight years earlier.

read more

Weekend Review: I'll Take Manhattan

Manhattan

Remember when nostalgia used to signify a comforting escape into the past? It hasn't been the same since Mad Men took us beneath the surface glamour to expose the grim consequences of chasing and selling the American dream. WGN America's bold new period drama Manhattan (Sunday, 9/8c) goes even further, eschewing the romantic veneer altogether in a gritty story of scientific mavericks operating in extreme circumstances. Looking back at a bygone time (World War II) with a jaundiced eye, the ambitious Manhattan is far more serious in intent than the channel's more recent effort at historical-fiction original programming, the lurid Salem.

read more

Critic's Notebook: Fox at TCA

Jada Pinkett Smith, Robin Lord Taylor

Gotham City to the rescue? Fox certainly hopes Gotham, its dark and stylish noir set in the corrupt, broken pre-Batman metropolis, will revive the fortunes of a network undergoing one of its most significant leadership transitions. (The architect of this fall's schedule, Kevin Reilly, stepped down in late May, and Dana Walden and Gary Newman, the Fox Studio heads who will take over network oversight in a more streamlined operation, won't start their new positions until the end of the month.)

The Gotham panel was the first and most impressive new-series presentation on Fox's day at the TCA press tour. (For more Fox news, go here.) With its revisionist twist on Batman mythology as it spills out origin stories featuring various supervillains-to-be, Gotham is the buzziest show on Fox's fall slate — airing on Mondays alongside breakout hit Sleepy Hollow won't hurt — but it's not without risk. read more

My Watchlist

On TV

Editors' Picks

11:29PM | NBC
8:15PM | BBC America
9:00PM | STARZ

Full Episodes

Find a TV Show

See more »

TV GUIDE Users' Most Popular