Only three episodes into the season and American Horror Story: Apocalypse gave us a WTF moment that will truly be hard to top: They killed off everyone.

Well, practically everyone. Venable (Sarah Paulson) and Mead (Kathy Bates) — who is most definitely a robot — conspired to murder everyone by giving them poisoned apples on Halloween. The plan went off without a hitch and simultaneously Mallory (Billie Lourd), Gallant (Evan Peters), Dinah (Adina Porter), Andre (Jeffrey Bowyer-Chapman), Timothy (Kyle Allen) and Emily (Ash Santos) dropped dead. Coco (Leslie Grossman), meanwhile, was killed at the hand of her ex-boyfriend Brock (Billy Eichner), who had snuck into the outpost that evening unaware it was about to become murder city.

Venable and Mead then smugly went to Langdon's (Cody Fern) room where the plan had been to kill him. However, it turns out that Mead's robotic programming wasn't set to make her loyal to Venable; it was set to make her loyal to Langdon, her creator. And so Mead turned the gun on Venable and fatally shot her.

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If you're wondering how the hell the show is going to continue when 90 percent of its characters are now dead, well that answer apparently lies in the much-anticipated return of the Coven witches Cordelia (Paulson), Madison (Emma Roberts) and Myrtle (Frances Conroy). When they arrived at the outpost, they immediately set to work reviving their "sisters," Mallory, Coco and Dinah, with Madison even appearing to know Mallory somehow. Everyone else, however, remains as dead as the Harmons.

So where the hell does the show go from here? And what did we even just watch? TV Guide spoke to Kyle Allen to try and learn as much about that deadly twist as possible.

This episode was wild because pretty much everyone was killed by the end of it. What was your reaction when you got this script?
Kyle Allen: I was like, aw snap. It's the Red Wedding in Episode 3. It's Ryan Murphy's Red Wedding. Well, I mean every season has something similar, but that was my first thought. I was like wow, this is not going where I thought it was going.

Fans have been cooking up wild theories about the importance of Timothy and Emily and then they died in the third episode. What has the fan reaction to this episode been like so far?
Allen: I think the most common message I've gotten is, "Nooooooooooo."

We saw the Coven witches resurrect Coco, Mallory and Dinah, but what about the rest? Will they really stay dead?
Allen:
Exactly. Right. What about the rest? I mean, I don't know. Maybe we'll just be buried in the garden so they could grow more apple trees.

I mean, you could come back as a ghost.
Allen:
Or I could come back as a ghost, like I could be cut in half and, like, half of me could come back as a ghost and the other half could come back as a zombie. Like, that'd be weird. It's as far as your imagination goes is the possibilities.

That death scene was absolutely disgusting. What was it like to film that?
Allen: It was such a blast. That was probably one of the most fun days on set. That and shooting Kathy [Bates] at the end of Episode 2. Those were great moments for me. See, everyone had to have this vomit. It was scripted that we would all die in different ways. But it was scripted that I vomited blood while other people vomited other stuff. It was just banana and lime and apple, the mixture of the vomit. And then I had fake blood, which just tastes terrible. It's like extra syrupy cough syrup, is kind of what blood tastes like. So that wasn't very fun. And then we had to hold for all these continuity things. So after I spit it out in Ashley's face — which she was so psyched for and I felt so bad that that was going to have to have to happen — and then we collapse on the floor, and then we're still sitting and I got a bunch of fake blood in my eye which burns a lot. But we had to stay there because they had to do all this set dressing stuff. So we had to stay there for 10 minutes and lie still while they fixed the rest of the room. So that was nuts. But it was fun. It was a really good time. That was my first death scene — no, second death scene.

It came together amazingly. It looked great, like disgustingly great.
Allen:
Oh, it's fantastic. Everyone was throwing up and vomiting all over each other and on the floor struggling and stuff. When we went to close-ups, we did them all in pairs. Like, Evan [Peters] and Billie [Lourd] both did their own thing but everyone else died in pairs. And so while they were dying everyone else was just watching, so we all just got to watch each other die and then be like, "Okay, they did the collapsing into each other so we should kind of roll off of the couch." Diversify the experience.

What are the chances that we're going to see you again this season, either as Timothy or a new character?
Allen:
On a scale of "I don't know" to "I can't tell you," it's probably a let's go to the next question.

How will the introduction of the Coven witches change the tone of the season moving forward?
Allen: I'm really excited about it. I think it just turns into Coven. Each of [creator Ryan Murphy's] seasons has a completely different tone, in my opinion. And I think with this season we had a very specific tone and then you introduce the bits of Murder House and the bits of Coven, so I guess we're creating a new thing. And then the Coven witches just add it all to the mixture.

What can you say about why the witches resurrected Coco, Dinah and Mallory and what their significance is?
Allen: No one is who you think they are.

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There is a theory going around that Coco, Dinah and Mallory are somehow hosting the spirits of some of the deceased Coven witches. Are fans getting somewhat on the right path with that theory?
Allen: Um, I have no idea about that. I have heard nothing along those lines.

This is your first season of America Horror Story. What's it like being a part of a project like this where there are so many crazy theories like this?
Allen:
It's fun. That's a past time on set, which I've come to realize. I think there's quite a handful of us that will sit around between takes and come up with new theories. Like the crew, hair and makeup, the wardrobe team, all the gaffers, we all just kind of chat at various points and we piece together these various patchwork theories of what the heck is going on.

People are also speculating that Mallory may be a seraph or an angel. What are the chances that we're going to see more religious or mythical creatures this season?
Allen: Again, I have no idea. I guess, if I'm speculating, I would say a lot more, just because that would be on-theme with the apocalypse and how the advertised it, like demons and the end times. It's very synonymous with Revelations. It's a very biblical event.

Whatever Mallory winds up being, she definitely spooked Langdon. How scary or powerful does someone have to be to frighten the Antichrist?
Allen: You know, I would say pretty powerful. I've always imagined the Antichrist being pretty all powerful seeming. So in order to freak him out, you've got to be at least above his level.

There had been a lot of theories about how Timothy and Emily were this season's Adam and Eve, and this episode literally saw them die from taking an apple. Do you see them as an allegory for Adam and Eve?
Allen: Yeah, yeah, it did seem that way. Now they have the knowledge of death.

A lot has been made of how Emily and Timothy have special DNA. What makes their DNA so special and when will we start to get answers about that?
Allen: I'm beginning to think it's a social experiment. They're just like, "How about we randomly select two people and tell them they're really special and just see what happens?"

Why would they have selected Timothy for that out of everyone in the world?
Allen:
I think it's because he's really smart.

American Horror Story: Apocalypse airs Wednesdays at 10/9c on FX.