You'Re In The Navy Now

  • 1951
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, War

A lightweight naval comedy, this casts Cooper as an inexperienced Navy officer, or "90-day wonder," who is placed in charge of an experimental patrol vessel that is equipped with a steam engine, instead of the usual diesel. To no one's surprise, Cooper is over his head in problems, especially since his entire crew, with one exception, is made up of other...read more

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A lightweight naval comedy, this casts Cooper as an inexperienced Navy officer, or "90-day wonder," who is placed in charge of an experimental patrol vessel that is equipped with a steam engine, instead of the usual diesel. To no one's surprise, Cooper is over his head in problems,

especially since his entire crew, with one exception, is made up of other 90-day wonders. The one exception, Mitchell, does his best to keep order but the obstacles prove too numerous. Cooper's troubles come to a head when the Admiral's Board announces that the steam-powered vessel, now dubbed the

USS Teakettle, will take part in a series of tests. The engines jam and the ship goes haywire, but Cooper and the crew come out of the mess with a commendation from naval captain von Zell for their dedication and hard work. Although this sixth Cooper-Hathaway teaming received a number of glowing

reviews, it failed to find an audience, chiefly because of its nondescript original title, U.S.S. TEAKETTLE. The film was temporarily shelved until it received its new title, YOU'RE IN THE NAVY NOW--which brought the film greater box office results, and by which it is best known today. Cooper

hadn't worked at 20th Century-Fox for 25 years, since he was an extra in a Tom Mix cowboy vehicle, the silent THE LUCKY HORSESHOE (1925). YOU'RE IN THE NAVY NOW served as a stepping stone for not one, but two aspiring actors--Charles Bronson and Lee Marvin--both of whom made their film debuts here

and would later gain fame in tough-guy roles. Bronson, then a 29-year-old first-year student at the Pasadena Playhouse, was sent by the theater school to audition for his first role in films after the school received a casting request calling for an actor who was "a cross between Humphrey Bogart

and John Garfield." After being cast in this film, Bronson got favorable reviews and other small parts, and liked the business enough to move to Hollywood, where he made 16 pictures using the name Buchinsky (also spelled Buchinski).

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: A lightweight naval comedy, this casts Cooper as an inexperienced Navy officer, or "90-day wonder," who is placed in charge of an experimental patrol vessel that is equipped with a steam engine, instead of the usual diesel. To no one's surprise, Cooper is… (more)

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