Under Western Stars

Rogers is a singing, hard-riding congressman from a dust-bowl state who journeys to Washington, DC, after being elected by fellow ranchers and cowpokes. He advocates public ownership of utilities (remember, this was the time of the New Deal; the Tennessee Valley Authority was just beginning to deliver electric power to farmers under the aegis of the federal...read more

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Rogers is a singing, hard-riding congressman from a dust-bowl state who journeys to Washington, DC, after being elected by fellow ranchers and cowpokes. He advocates public ownership of utilities (remember, this was the time of the New Deal; the Tennessee Valley Authority was just

beginning to deliver electric power to farmers under the aegis of the federal government). Specifically, he wants free water supplies for his drought-ridden constituents. With the help of sidekick Burnette and others, his platform wins out. He gains support by showing influential Washingtonians a

documentary film dealing with the ravages of the dust bowl, demonstrating once again the power of cinema. This was the first starring film for "The King of the Cowboys," and it made Rogers an instant success. Studio head Herbert J. Yates had groomed Rogers for stardom as a tactic in his continuing

battle with his most profitable star, the mettlesome but extremely popular Gene Autry. The result exceeded all expectations. Not one to tamper with success, Yates extended the victory by putting director Kane at the helm of 41 more of Rogers' starring vehicles.