Twenty Million Sweethearts

  • 1934
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

A pleasant satire on radio with good performances from the stars, especially O'Brien, who seemed to have been directed by Howard Hawks, rather than Ray Enright. O'Brien is the catalyst and sails through his scenes with aplomb. He's an agent who finds singing waiter Powell and plans to make him the next big radio star. Powell has trouble with "mike fright,"...read more

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A pleasant satire on radio with good performances from the stars, especially O'Brien, who seemed to have been directed by Howard Hawks, rather than Ray Enright. O'Brien is the catalyst and sails through his scenes with aplomb. He's an agent who finds singing waiter Powell and plans to make

him the next big radio star. Powell has trouble with "mike fright," though, and that has to be worked out. Meanwhile, Rogers is a radio star who has just lost her own weekly program and she helps Powell get over his problem. By the end of the film, Powell and Rogers (who was on loan from RKO) have

become the darlings of the airwaves. Lots of pointed humor about the radio business that could just as easily be applied today to television. It was remade with Doris Day in 1949 as MY DREAM IS YOURS. Harry Warren and Al Dubin wrote several of the songs which included "Fair and Warmer" (sung by

Ted Fio Rito), "What Are Your Intentions?" (The Debutantes), "Out for No Good" (Ginger Rogers), "I'll String Along with You" (Rogers and Powell, the biggest hit from the film). Other tunes were "The Man on the Flying Trapeze" (Walter O'Keefe, sung by Powell), "How'm I Doin?" (Lem Fowler, Don

Redman, sung by the Mills Brothers), "Oh, I Heard, Yes, I Heard" (Redman, sung by the Mills Brothers). One piece of special material (uncredited) was a Yiddish version of "The Last Round-Up" (sung by Eddie Foster, Billy Snyder, Morris Goldman, and Matt Brooks). In a bit role, note Dennis O'Keefe

as a reporter. Long-time musician and bandleader for Art Linkletter, Muzzy Marcellino, is seen as himself. A very entertaining picture about radio; Powell and Rogers made a good team but O'Brien got all the laughs with his breezy performance.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: A pleasant satire on radio with good performances from the stars, especially O'Brien, who seemed to have been directed by Howard Hawks, rather than Ray Enright. O'Brien is the catalyst and sails through his scenes with aplomb. He's an agent who finds singi… (more)

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