Tonight Is Ours

  • 1933
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Romance

A minor Noel Coward play is turned into a tedious movie that should have been a musical. It's the typical Cinderfella story that's been seen all too often before and required the light touch of Ernst Lubitsch or someone of that ilk to make it work. Set in Paris, it's the familiar tale of the princess of a mythical country (Colbert) who meets a commoner,...read more

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A minor Noel Coward play is turned into a tedious movie that should have been a musical. It's the typical Cinderfella story that's been seen all too often before and required the light touch of Ernst Lubitsch or someone of that ilk to make it work. Set in Paris, it's the familiar tale of

the princess of a mythical country (Colbert) who meets a commoner, March, falls in love with him, and goes against the wishes of everyone who wants her to marry a man of her own station, Cavanagh. While Colbert and March are having their romance in Paris, Colbert's father and brother are slain by

revolutionaries, and she must race back to her mittel-European land to take over the throne. Just prior to coming to Paris, Colbert had been due to marry Gamble, who turned out to have slightly weird ideas of how to spend their wedding night, wishing her to masquerade as a slave so he could

dominate her. Meeting March is a breath of fresh air, and she reluctantly leaves him to lead her land. March follows her to the small country and saves her life when an assassin takes aim. Then, in a twist that only a musical comedy plot would allow, the revolutionaries decide that Colbert would

make a good ruler so they establish a constitutional monarchy, approving March as their queen's consort when they discover that he is a commoner and one of them. Very talky, with little of Coward's wit to help matters. It's amiable enough and with sharper words it might have had some impact, but

it's defeated by the tedious script, and all the gaiety and bubbliness of the actors can't save the movie from a monotony of heavy pacing. Mitchell Leisen, who went on to helm some of the best of this genre, was Walker's associate director, an odd credit. Usually, there is the director and his (or

her) assistants. Calling Leisen "associate director" must have meant that he was the only person on the set who would associate with Walker.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: A minor Noel Coward play is turned into a tedious movie that should have been a musical. It's the typical Cinderfella story that's been seen all too often before and required the light touch of Ernst Lubitsch or someone of that ilk to make it work. Set in… (more)

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