Thirty-Day Princess

A combination of "Cinderella" and "The Prisoner Of Zenda," this is a pleasant comedy with a few moments of exceptional dialog from the typewriters of Preston Sturges and several others. Sidney plays a dual role as the princess of a middle European country and a struggling New York actress. When the princess comes to the US to secure backing for her country's...read more

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A combination of "Cinderella" and "The Prisoner Of Zenda," this is a pleasant comedy with a few moments of exceptional dialog from the typewriters of Preston Sturges and several others. Sidney plays a dual role as the princess of a middle European country and a struggling New York

actress. When the princess comes to the US to secure backing for her country's bond issue, she contracts a case of the mumps and has to be put in bed immediately. Arnold, the Manhattan banker behind the bonds, stands to lose a huge commission if the issue falls through. Sidney the princess is

scheduled for several public appearances in front of various potential investors, and so a substitute has to be found. (A similar plot was used in FOLIES BERGERE and countless other movies.) Arnold knows that in a city the size of New York there must be some woman who can be pressed into service.

An actress who is one step away from welfare is found (Sidney again) and hired to be the princess until the latter's mumps disappear. Grant, the publisher of New York's most important newspaper, knows the real reason why the princess has come. Although the official press release is that she's here

on a goodwill mission, Grant suspects Arnold's motives and knows that the man is not to be trusted. Further, Grant is an America-first type who abhors anyone not home-grown. When Grant meets the actress-princess, he is at once entranced by her and his reservations about foreigners begin to

crumble. He falls in love with her, but thinking she is a princess, he keeps his attentions businesslike level and never admits how he feels. The actress is falling in love with Grant, but he is so important in the press that she can't come clean. When the princess' European boy friend Barnett

arrives, he becomes insanely jealous of the goo-goo eyes being made by the two. A few plot turns for good comedic value and, after a month, Sidney's jaws abate and she can again resume her position as princess. Grant is stunned to think that he believed the actress, but that's set aside when he

realizes that he does love her and that he can marry her. This plot is so old that it must have been found written in cuneiform somewhere. Yet Grant's sincerity and Sidney's charm manage to carry it off. Barnett is a smasher as the suitor and gets huge laughs in an unaccustomed role.