The Wolves Of Kromer

It's not the first gay werewolf movie — that dubious honor belongs to 1988's CURSE OF THE QUEERWOLF — but 23-year-old British director Will Gould's allegorical fable is the first one worth seeing. In the cozy English village of Kromer, where few things are as feared as "wolves" (read: gay men), wandering lycanthropes Seth (Lee Williams) and Gabriel...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Reviewed by Ken Fox
Rating:

It's not the first gay werewolf movie — that dubious honor belongs to 1988's CURSE OF THE QUEERWOLF — but 23-year-old British director Will Gould's allegorical fable is the first one worth seeing. In the cozy English village of Kromer, where few things are

as feared as "wolves" (read: gay men), wandering lycanthropes Seth (Lee Williams) and Gabriel (James Layton) meet and fall in love. No smelly pelts and sharp fangs here: Seth and "Gabs" look more like fashion models than Lon Chaney Jr., but we know they're wolves by their pointed ears and fur

coats. Meanwhile, on a nearby country estate, Steve and Mary Drax (David Prescott, Angharad Rees) and their two children (Matthew Dean and Leila Lloyd-Evelyn) rush to the deathbed of Mr. Drax's mother (Rosemary Dunham), a rich widow who's being slowly poisoned by her greedy housekeeper, Fanny

(Rita Davies). Fanny and her dotty friend, Doreen (Margaret Towner), have been injecting Mrs. Drax with insulin, but when they hear there are nasty wolves about, they switch to Plan B: Parking Mrs. Drax and her wheelchair outdoors overnight and blaming her subsequent death on the wolves. The

perceived threat of homosexuality has long been the subtext of horror movies and literature, but rarely has it been made so explicit — Gould and screenwriter Charles Lambert, who adapted the script from his stageplay, are mainly interested in seeing how far the analogy between "queer" and

"movie monster" will stretch. Unfortunately, it doesn't stretch very far before it begins to trip over itself, and what the film lacks in subtlety it also lacks in inventiveness. But no matter: Aside from an unfortunate streak of misogyny (the film's real locus of monstrousness ultimately shifts

from the wolves to the women) and some too-obvious plot twists, the film is totally daft and a lot of fun.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Released: 1998
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: It's not the first gay werewolf movie — that dubious honor belongs to 1988's CURSE OF THE QUEERWOLF — but 23-year-old British director Will Gould's allegorical fable is the first one worth seeing. In the cozy English village of Kromer, where few… (more)

Show More »

Trending TonightSee all »