The Fourth Protocol

  • 1987
  • Movie
  • R
  • Spy, Thriller

Frederick Forsyth's three previous novels to be made into movies (THE DAY OF THE JACKAL, THE ODESSA FILE, and THE DOGS OF WAR) were of variable quality. This time, Forsyth took a much more active role, writing the screenplay and functioning as the executive producer, but the result is hardly impressive. Based on reported fact (at least among espionage buffs),...read more

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Frederick Forsyth's three previous novels to be made into movies (THE DAY OF THE JACKAL, THE ODESSA FILE, and THE DOGS OF WAR) were of variable quality. This time, Forsyth took a much more active role, writing the screenplay and functioning as the executive producer, but the result is

hardly impressive. Based on reported fact (at least among espionage buffs), this spy thriller concerns the 1968 agreement between the Soviet Union, Britain, and the United States stipulating that none of them would attempt to smuggle a nuclear weapon into the other's country and explode it. To do

so would mean that there would be no time for an alert, a counter strike, or even to learn who did it. Renegade Russian and British spies decide to get rid of NATO by arranging just such an operation and they assign KGB agent Petrofsky (Brosnan) to plant a nuclear bomb near an American Air Force

base in Britain. John Preston (Caine) is the British intelligence agent called in to stop Petrofsky. A competent, if unremarkable, espionage thriller that is enjoyable while it lasts and forgotten moments after the credits roll.

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  • Released: 1987
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Frederick Forsyth's three previous novels to be made into movies (THE DAY OF THE JACKAL, THE ODESSA FILE, and THE DOGS OF WAR) were of variable quality. This time, Forsyth took a much more active role, writing the screenplay and functioning as the executiv… (more)

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