Tea For Two

  • 1950
  • 1 HR 38 MIN
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

This delightful musical suggested by the Broadway hit of 1924, "No, No, Nanette," features a revised story line and several additional songs. The gentle Sakall is seen telling the story of how Day and MacRae met to their two teenaged children. In flashback, Day is a wealthy heiress with a desire to finance and star in a Broadway show. Uncle Sakall doesn't...read more

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This delightful musical suggested by the Broadway hit of 1924, "No, No, Nanette," features a revised story line and several additional songs. The gentle Sakall is seen telling the story of how Day and MacRae met to their two teenaged children. In flashback, Day is a wealthy heiress with

a desire to finance and star in a Broadway show. Uncle Sakall doesn't have the heart to tell her that she's been wiped out by the Wall Street crash. Day tells De Wolfe, the producer, that she's willing to put up the $25,000 necessary to underwrite the show, and when she asks guardian Sakall for

the money, he tries to avoid the truth. He says that her problem is that she always says "yes" to anyone who asks her for anything. If she is willing to answer every question for 24 hours with a "no," he will give her the money. The next day proves to be immensely difficult, with predictable

consequences and comedy as Day has to be negative about everything while pal Wymore looks on. Winmore can't say anything either in order to satisfy the terms of the deal. When Day completes the requisite 24 hours, she is stunned to learn that she is poor. Her attorney puts up the cash, and the

show that they do, "No, No, Nanette," is a hit. Day and MacRae work well together and later appeared together in THE WEST POINT STORY, ON MOONLIGHT BAY, and BY THE LIGHT OF THE SILVERY MOON. Day dances for the first time here, with help from Nelson and the energetic choreography of Prinz. The

movie features some sharp dialog from Clork, peppy dances, and a host of tunes including "I Know That You Know" (Anne Caldwell, Vincent Youmans, sung by Day, MacRae, later danced by Nelson and Day), "Crazy Rhythm" (Irving Caesar, Roger Wolfe Kahn, Joseph Meyer, danced by Wymore, Nelson),

"Charleston" (Cecil Mack, Jimmie Johnson, performed by De Wolfe, Gibson), "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Harry Warren, Al Dubin, sung by MacRae, danced by Gibson), "Tea for Two" (Caesar, Youmans, sung by Day, MacRae), "I Want to Be Happy" (Caesar, Youmans, sung by Day, MacRae), "Oh Me, Oh My" (Ira

Gershwin, Youmans, sung by Day, danced by Nelson), "The Call of the Sea" (Youmans, Caesar, Otto Harbach), "Do Do Do" (George and Ira Gershwin), "No, No, Nanette" (Youmans, Harbach). On "Oh Me, Oh My," Ira Gershwin used his pseudonym of "Arthur Francis." The band work under the direction of

Heindorf is excellent. Among the musicians were jazz players Buddy Cole, Onest Conley, Manny Vanderhans, Rolly Bundock, Dick Fisher, Ernie Felice, and Dick Anderson. Butler's direction was solid. De Wolfe was very funny, as was Sakall, two of the best second bananas in the movie business. Composer

Caesar was a most generous man who opened his own publishing company in New York's famed Brill Building and gave breaks to many aspiring songwriters.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: This delightful musical suggested by the Broadway hit of 1924, "No, No, Nanette," features a revised story line and several additional songs. The gentle Sakall is seen telling the story of how Day and MacRae met to their two teenaged children. In flashback… (more)

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