St. Ives

Raymond St. Ives (Bronson), a crime reporter-cum-novelist, is contacted by Abner Procane (Houseman) to recover some stolen ledgers that could potentially set off a gang war between two rival mob factions. St. Ives reluctantly accepts the job, which leads him into a labyrinth of betrayal and murder. Surprisingly, the violence is toned down in ST. IVES, unusual...read more

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Raymond St. Ives (Bronson), a crime reporter-cum-novelist, is contacted by Abner Procane (Houseman) to recover some stolen ledgers that could potentially set off a gang war between two rival mob factions. St. Ives reluctantly accepts the job, which leads him into a labyrinth of betrayal

and murder. Surprisingly, the violence is toned down in ST. IVES, unusual for a Charles Bronson film. This gives Bronson more of a chance to act, which he does in decidedly better form than in most of his films. For once Bronson gets to show he knows more than three facial expressions; however,

the film is hampered by much confusion within the plot, and at some points even a little violence would have served as a welcome relief from the tedium. Jacqueline Bisset has a minor role as the love interest, conveying a volatile eroticism simply by unzipping her dress. Watch for Daniel J.

Travanti (of TV's "Hill Street Blues") in an early appearance. Jeff Goldblum, who would later score in THE BIG CHILL and THE FLY, also has a bit part.

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