Son Of Kong

  • 1933
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Adventure, Horror

Hot to capitalize on the massive success of KING KONG, RKO Studios, now headed by Merian C. Cooper, decided to rush a sequel before the cameras under the direction of Ernest B. Schoedsack. The result is a funny, entertaining little film that pales in comparison with the original, but has enough value in its own right. Picking up where KING KONG left off,...read more

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Hot to capitalize on the massive success of KING KONG, RKO Studios, now headed by Merian C. Cooper, decided to rush a sequel before the cameras under the direction of Ernest B. Schoedsack. The result is a funny, entertaining little film that pales in comparison with the original, but has

enough value in its own right. Picking up where KING KONG left off, the film opens as the irrepressible Carl Denham (Robert Armstrong) finds nearly every lawyer in New York City ready to sue him for the damage done by the late Eighth Wonder of the World. In an effort to avoid these lawsuits,

Denham and Capt. Englehorn (Frank Reicher) set off for the China seas, hoping to find a hidden treasure stashed on Skull Island, the very place that spawned King Kong. Sure enough, they meet the son of Kong. Standing a mere 25 feet tall (his dad towered over 50 feet), this new gorilla's most

striking feature is his white fur. Kong's son also has a much more pleasant disposition than his father, and tags along with the humans, offering his large helping hands. Of course, there are several giant beasts roaming the island to threaten the humans (including a brontosaurus, a stegosaurus, a

lizard-like creature, and a sea monster), and the friendly Kong, Jr., comes to the expedition's rescue. Where KING KONG was heavy and dramatic, filled with excitement and action, SON OF KONG relies on comedy and cuteness. Kong fils is a very friendly, comical creature with an extremely expressive

face who mimics the behavior of those around him. This approach to the material was probably budgetary--Cooper was handed a tiny budget of $250,000, more than $400,000 less than he spent on KING KONG. Knowing there was little time or money to make an elaborate adventure filled with animated

monsters, Cooper and his wife, screenwriter Ruth Rose, went to work on a story that emphasized and developed the human characters, with the special effects kept to a minimum. Willis O'Brien, who did the marvelous effects for KING KONG, reluctantly returned for SON OF KONG and, though unhappy with

the limitations, still did some of his best work.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Hot to capitalize on the massive success of KING KONG, RKO Studios, now headed by Merian C. Cooper, decided to rush a sequel before the cameras under the direction of Ernest B. Schoedsack. The result is a funny, entertaining little film that pales in compa… (more)

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