Silver City Bonanza

Knife-throwing Kennedy murders a blind man and tries to force Kay off of her ranch so he can get to the silver he knows is on the bottom of her land's lake. Allen and comedy sidekick Ebsen are the two heroic cowpokes who use the blind man's dog to track down Kennedy and stop his evil schemes once and for all. This is definitely one of the more outrageous...read more

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Knife-throwing Kennedy murders a blind man and tries to force Kay off of her ranch so he can get to the silver he knows is on the bottom of her land's lake. Allen and comedy sidekick Ebsen are the two heroic cowpokes who use the blind man's dog to track down Kennedy and stop his evil

schemes once and for all. This is definitely one of the more outrageous programmer westerns, utilizing a haunted ranch and an underwater battle as plot devices. However, the film is just amiable enough to make the fantastic script (by the always imaginative Williams) work well in its own way. Roy

Rogers and Republic parted company the year of this film's release; singing star Allen had been groomed by the company's clever head man, Herbert J. Yates, as the new "King of the Cowboys," just as Rogers had been groomed to replace Gene Autry in that role. By this time, though, the singing cowboy

craze had nearly run its course. Comic-relief Ebsen dances with little Alix Ebsen in one sequence. He does well, and why not? He and his sister Vilma had done a dance act in the Ziegfeld Follies and in vaudeville and early films for some years. The lovely Kay was given substantially more to do in

this film than most heroines in most westerns; she made five others with Allen in 1951 and 1952, and also worked with western stars Allan "Rocky" Lane and Charles Starrett. The songs--sung by Allen, of course--include "Lollipop Lane," "Sweet Evalina," and the cowpoke classic "I Ride an Old

Paint."

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