Shwaas

Beautiful location photography shot on the lush, western coastal region of India isn't nearly enough to compensate for this stodgy, disease-of-the-week melodrama's deadly dull pacing. Three months after his young grandson, Pararshuram (Ashwin Chitale), began having serious trouble with his eyesight, elderly Keshav Vichare (Arun Nalavade) travels all the...read more

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Reviewed by Ken Fox
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Beautiful location photography shot on the lush, western coastal region of India isn't nearly enough to compensate for this stodgy, disease-of-the-week melodrama's deadly dull pacing. Three months after his young grandson, Pararshuram (Ashwin Chitale), began having serious trouble with his eyesight, elderly Keshav Vichare (Arun Nalavade) travels all the way from his picturesque village on the Konkan coast to the big city, where he insists on seeing the popular Dr. Sane (Sandeep Kulkarni). Keshav explains that over the past few months his grandson has become disturbingly near-sighted and often sees double; flashbacks reveal not just a number of close calls — Parashuram nearly stumbling off of a cliff, Parashuram running smack into a tree — but also grandpa Keshav's concern and loving care. Dr. Sane recommends an MRI and a CAT scan. When the results come back, he enlists the help of a pretty young medical social worker (Amruta Subhash) to break the grim news to an understandably anxious Keshav: Parashuram has retino-blastoma, a rare form of eye cancer. Luckily, it's still in its earliest stages; unluckily, the only treatment involves removing Parahuram's eyes. Determined to save his grandson's sight, Keshav seeks out another doctor for a second opinion, while everyone argues over who's going to tell Parashuram he'll soon be blind. It's hard for an audience to sympathize with a seriously underwritten character; the fact that Parashuram never really emerges has anything more than an afflicted child makes it tough to care whether or not he can see, and the long, talky scenes that go in circles only makes things worse. The gorgeously shot montage of the Konkan countryside makes for a nice break from the overall tedium, but only further diminishes whatever momentum the film manages to build. (In Marathi, with English subtitles)

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  • Released: 2003
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Beautiful location photography shot on the lush, western coastal region of India isn't nearly enough to compensate for this stodgy, disease-of-the-week melodrama's deadly dull pacing. Three months after his young grandson, Pararshuram (Ashwin Chitale), beg… (more)

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