Second Honeymoon

  • 1937
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Romance

Usually dour author Phillip Wylie ("The Disappearance," "Opus 21," etc.) turned in a lightweight, giddy Redbook story that's given appropriate treatment by the screenwriters, director, and actors. These were the days when the rich were treated with disdain and satire by writers. Heiresses were always wealthy but unhappy, forever seeking real meaning in...read more

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Usually dour author Phillip Wylie ("The Disappearance," "Opus 21," etc.) turned in a lightweight, giddy Redbook story that's given appropriate treatment by the screenwriters, director, and actors. These were the days when the rich were treated with disdain and satire by writers.

Heiresses were always wealthy but unhappy, forever seeking real meaning in life. Power and Young were making their fourth film together in less than a year and this piece about infidelity is typical of the material they were given. Young has been divorced from Power because he was an irresponsible

playboy who was exciting, but much too erratic for her sensibilities. She's married Talbot, a stolid, conservative businessman who runs a large belt company. He's dull, but predictable, and that is what she evidently needs at this point in her life. While on holiday in Florida, Young meets her

ex-husband, and the spark that once was there ignites again, but both attempt to deny it. Power wants to be friends with Young's husband, so he tosses a soiree in their honor, and the guest list includes Young's friend, Trevor, and her husband, Bromberg. The two are Miami millionaires who spend

much time being social. To indicate that he is not after Young, Power brings Weaver to the party, a pert brunette who never shuts up, taking over every conversation and being the cutest thing anyone's ever seen. Weaver is in Florida to nab a wealthy husband and makes no bones about her quest,

which disturbs some of the guests at the party. Erwin is Power's valet, a man who has taken and passed almost 100 correspondence school courses but still has the personality of an otter. Weaver sees something in Erwin, and their romance begins in earnest, although Young is disturbed when she sees

Weaver at the apartment on several occasions, thinking that Weaver has come to see Power. There's a fishing party aboard a boat, and Talbot is pushed overboard fully clothed and towed out to sea by a sting ray that has been harpooned.

Talbot gets a message that he has to go north to conclude some important business matters and leaves Young in the care of Power, never dreaming that she could have an affair with her ex-husband (it just isn't done in the best circles). Once the cat's out of the way, the mice begin to play, and

Power turns on his highpowered woomanship. Talbot makes several phone calls to convince Young to leave Florida, but she insists on staying. He comes south and gets into a mean spat with her, and both are hauled off to Dade County Jail. After their release, Young tries to find Power and learns that

he's at the local airport. When she arrives there, she sees that he is with Weaver and thinks they are going off together, but the truth is that Power is about to ferry Erwin and Weaver to the justice of the peace who will legalize their relationship. Young goes back to Talbot, resigned that she's

lost Power to Weaver. It isn't long before she and Talbot are battling once more, and she tells Talbot that she wants her freedom, thereby branding her a two-time loser in the marriage game at the age of 24 (which was her actual age as well). When Trevor tells her that Power did not marry Weaver,

Young is thrilled, runs back to him, and, in the last scene, the happy couple fly off in Power's plane for their second honeymoon. Some lovely moments, snappy dialog, terrific costumes, and lots of money lavished on production values. Great things were predicted for Weaver after scoring in this,

her fifth movie and by far her largest role. They never came to pass, and she spent most of her career in low-budget Fox films.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Usually dour author Phillip Wylie ("The Disappearance," "Opus 21," etc.) turned in a lightweight, giddy Redbook story that's given appropriate treatment by the screenwriters, director, and actors. These were the days when the rich were treated with disdain… (more)

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