Robin And The Seven Hoods

  • 1964
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Crime

The title indicates exactly what this is: a parody of the famed archer and his Merry Men, set in Chicago, just before the crash, when Prohibition was the road to riches for hoodlums. The film serves as another summit meeting of "the Clan"--with Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford being the only members missing from the cast. ROBIN AND THE SEVEN HOODS owes much...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

Next on TV

Rating:

The title indicates exactly what this is: a parody of the famed archer and his Merry Men, set in Chicago, just before the crash, when Prohibition was the road to riches for hoodlums. The film serves as another summit meeting of "the Clan"--with Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford being the only

members missing from the cast. ROBIN AND THE SEVEN HOODS owes much of its style and content to the Damon Runyon-derived GUYS AND DOLLS. It even includes one Crosby number that resembles "Sit Down You're Rockin' the Boat"--the Stubby Kaye song that was in GUYS AND DOLLS. Robinson is the undisputed

boss of all bosses. It's his birthday party, and all the mobsters sing his praise. Then, less than three minutes into the film, Robinson is shot to death. Falk immediately declares himself chief, with no opposition from Sinatra and Henry providing the new leader realizes that the north side of

Chicago is theirs. Martin, a small-timer from the sticks, arrives in Chicago and joins Sinatra's band. In the several battles that break out, Sinatra's and Falk's nightclubs are destroyed. Sinatra decides to build again--this time including a facade that can transform the club into a revival hall

at the press of a button. Falk, who doesn't know this, tips the cops off through his personal flunky, Buono (a sheriff). When the officers raid the place, all they find is a choir singing hallelujahs. Robinson's daughter, Rush, wants to avenge her father's death, so she presses $50,000 on Sinatra

to find and kill Robinson's murderer. Sinatra doesn't want the money or the assignment, so he gives the scratch to Davis--with orders to get rid of it as he sees fit. Davis thinks the money can be put to good use, so he hands it over to Crosby, who runs an orphanage (a parody of the role he played

in GOING MY WAY--without the clerical collar). When Crosby finds out that the money is a donation from Sinatra, he alerts the press, and the criminal's picture is soon appearing in the papers as Chicago's own Robin Hood. So pleased is Sinatra with this publicity that he employs Crosby to handle

his personal charitable donations.

Meanwhile Sinatra gets to know--and like--Rush. Being Robinson's daughter has provided her with an elegant education, and Sinatra wonders if he can rise to such a classy dame's level. Then he's chagrined to learn that, for all her uppity airs, she's a thief and is using the charitable foundation

as a front for a counterfeiting ring run by her and Martin. Sinatra throws Martin out of his group and tells Rush that the town isn't big enough for both of them. He doesn't plan to leave, so she'd better. Rush approaches Falk with a proposition for killing both Sinatra and Martin. Falk would be

happy to do that for nothing but now stands to make a profit. Falk doesn't quite make it, though, and winds up encased in cement. Rush is still smarting about her failure, so she becomes a reformer and organizes a women's crime-fighting club to put these criminals out of business. This plan works;

Sinatra, Martin, and Davis are soon ruined and are reduced to panhandling. In the final sequence, the trio approaches a limousine and is shocked to discover that the occupants are Rush and Crosby, who blithely toss the men a few coins and then walk into Rush's reform-group headquarters.

Some funny lines, a few good songs, and a feeling that the actors are having a wonderful time all help to make this a pleasant way to pass two hours. Robinson's line, "I never asked my boys to work on holidays, except maybe once. On St. Valentine's Day," gets a huge laugh. Not funny but bizarre

were some odd coincidences associated with the filming. For example, the Robinson funeral scene was being shot at a local cemetery on November 22, 1963, where there was a gravestone for a man named John Kennedy who had died 80 years before. Since the President was a pal of Sinatra's, there was

some laughter about the stone. Then, near lunch time, the word was flashed around the location set that Kennedy had been shot in Dallas. Still filming in December, Sinatra learned, while rehearsing a kidnaping sequence, that his son--Frank, Jr.,--had been kidnaped in Nevada. There is now no kidnap

scene in ROBIN AND THE SEVEN HOODS. Falk was excellent as the crook, demonstrating his great capacity for comedy as well as for drama, in a role reminiscent of the one he played in POCKETFUL OF MIRACLES. Victor Buono too was, as always, a delight to watch. All the supporting crooks had previously

been seen in serious versions of the roles they played in this film: Jenkins, La Rue, Carricart, et al. Riddle's score received an Academy nomination. Cahn and Van Heusen's score included the Oscar-nominated "My Kind of Town" (sung by Sinatra), "Don't Be a Do-Badder" (sung by Crosby), "All for

One" (sung by Falk), "Mr. Booze" (sung by Crosby, Martin, Sinatra, Davis), "Style" (sung by Sinatra, Martin, Crosby), "Any Man Who Loves His Mother" (sung by Martin), "Bang Bang" (sung by Davis) "Charlotte Couldn't Charleston," "Give Praise" (sung by Chorus). Bakalyan, who has since earned a fine

living playing crooks or cops (CHINATOWN), is seen briefly. Fein quit acting to cocreate "Hogan's Heroes" for TV and retire a rich man. Henry was a longtime pal of Sinatra's who earned his living as a burlesque comic in Las Vegas when he wasn't making movies. Douglas was Sinatra's kind of

director, a one-take man who was always ready when Sinatra was. That kind of speedy work endeared him to Old Blue Eyes, who doesn't like directors that spend forever lining up shots--which is probably why Douglas directed several Sinatra pictures, including TONY ROME; THE DETECTIVE; and LADY IN

CEMENT.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: NR
  • Review: The title indicates exactly what this is: a parody of the famed archer and his Merry Men, set in Chicago, just before the crash, when Prohibition was the road to riches for hoodlums. The film serves as another summit meeting of "the Clan"--with Joey Bishop… (more)

Show More »

Trending TonightSee all »