Road To Morocco

  • 1942
  • 1 HR 23 MIN
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

The third, and best, in the "Road" series, ROAD TO MOROCCO has everything going for it. Bob Hope and Bing Crosby were not yet tired of the formula, and their breezy acting wafts the picture along in a melange of gags, songs, thrills, and calculated absurdities. The duo had already sent up adventure movies in ROAD TO SINGAPORE and jungle films in ROAD TO...read more

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The third, and best, in the "Road" series, ROAD TO MOROCCO has everything going for it. Bob Hope and Bing Crosby were not yet tired of the formula, and their breezy acting wafts the picture along in a melange of gags, songs, thrills, and calculated absurdities. The duo had already sent up

adventure movies in ROAD TO SINGAPORE and jungle films in ROAD TO ZANZIBAR--the next target was the Arabian Nights. Jeff Peters (Crosby) and Turkey Jackson (Hope) are the lone survivors of a Mediterranean shipwreck. They land on a beach, mount a passing camel, and go off toward Morocco, where they

learn that things aren't swell. The area is parched, the people poor, and foreigners looked upon with scorn. The two are penniless and hungry when a local merchant offers Jeff money to sell Turkey into slavery as the personal plaything of Princess Shalmar (Dorothy Lamour). Jeff makes the deal,

Turkey is forcibly removed to the palace, and life in Morocco gets increasingly difficult for everyone thereafter. The picture is filled with great gags and one-liners, including Hope's lament for the Oscar he might have won; the camel's complaint that "this is the screwiest picture I've ever been

in!"; Hope's appearance in drag; and the backfire of the "patty cake" routine, after which it's remarked, "Hmmm. That gag sure got around." And there are countless more, delivered at a pace that never lets up.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: The third, and best, in the "Road" series, ROAD TO MOROCCO has everything going for it. Bob Hope and Bing Crosby were not yet tired of the formula, and their breezy acting wafts the picture along in a melange of gags, songs, thrills, and calculated absurdi… (more)

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