Return Of The Street Fighter

  • 1975
  • Movie
  • R
  • Action, Martial Arts

Start with a plot even more nonsensical than was the case with the original STREET FIGHTER (1975), consisting solely of brutal fights and lame transitional sequences to set them up. Then take out the fights. What you're left with is a sorry, discombobulated mess. Mercenary Terry Sugury (Sonny Chiba) is hired to silence a stool pigeon in police custody....read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

Rating:

Start with a plot even more nonsensical than was the case with the original STREET FIGHTER (1975), consisting solely of brutal fights and lame transitional sequences to set them up. Then take out the fights. What you're left with is a sorry, discombobulated mess.

Mercenary Terry Sugury (Sonny Chiba) is hired to silence a stool pigeon in police custody. He gets himself arrested, crushes the man's voicebox, and escapes. Elsewhere, Mafia-affiliated mobster Otaguro (Donald Nakajima) is stealing billions from investors in a scam "Asian Martial Arts Center," to

the chagrin of Masaoka (Masafumi Suzuki), a karate instructor. Otaguro tries to hire Sugury to kill Masaoka but is turned down, and vows to have them both wiped out.

Several set of assassins, including Junjo (Masishi Ishibashi) from THE STREET FIGHTER--still alive despite having his larynx yanked out-- try to kill Sugury but only manages to wound him. Sugury's sidekick Kitty (Yoko Ichui) drags him to safety in the sewer; admitting to being a Mafia agent but

now resolutely on his side, she nurses him back to health. Meanwhile, Don Costello (Claude Gannyon) takes over the mob; he immediately kills Otaguro and abducts Kitty. Sugury fights his way into the criminals' lair, past dozens of thugs, to find Kitty blinded and dying. He takes on and kills

Junjo, then chases Costello outside, where the mobster is killed in a gas truck explosion.

Clearly trying to duplicate the elements of the first film, the writers give Sugury a new comic partner, Kitty, a woman with goofy hair and oversize glasses. Once again this sidekick, in love with Sugury, betrays him in some way, repents, and makes it up to him, then dies anyway. Once again Sugury

fights Junjo, once again in the rain. Once again he kills Junjo. Black-and-white flashbacks return us several times to scenes from THE STREET FIGHTER. The vague and confused plot is as stupid as can be, the central scam a fuzzy con game that hardly seems worth the trouble. There are scenes of

fighters training with exotic weapons, setting up the fights with Sugury later; he stalks out on Otaguro, takes a ski-lift to the top of a snowy mountain for no reason (even Kitty asks what they're doing there), only to be attacked by the fighters, who apparently knew he was coming.

Chiba gets to show off his physique and abilities in an exercise sequence, and again in a fight in a sauna. When cut, he licks his own blood, spurring him on to greater violence, just like his inspiration, Bruce Lee. Sugury (pronounced, as in the first film, "Shurugi") performs impossible leaps

straight out of Hong Kong fantasy films and, hearing that there's a contract on Masaoka, angrily pours booze all over himself. In a subplot, a policeman (Zulu Yachi) shamefully takes a leave of absence after Sugury silences his prisoner; a student of Masaoka, the cop then wanders pointlessly in

and out of the story before being killed by Otaguro's men. Yet for all the meandering anachronisms of the script, it clocks in at approximately an hour and a quarter. Why? Because as with the first film, the ratings board insisted that the only way to avoid an X rating was to cut out all the

bloody scenes. And unlike the first film, the cut version was all that was available domestically, as of the reissue of the four STREET FIGHTER films on US home video in the late 1990s. (An 82-minute version was released in Japan, complete with scenes like Sugury punching a foe in the back of the

head with such force that the poor guy's eyeballs pop out.) As a result, fights begin and end abruptly, characters are unexpectedly bloody or disappear entirely midscene, and Costello, without explanation, is suddenly missing an eye. (In the Japanese version, he loses it to a dagger thrown by

Sugury. Kitty is also blinded by the criminals for betraying them. It's a veritable bonanza for fans of optic mayhem.) Considering that the film only exists to depict random acts of brutal violence, any possible reason to watch it is instantly moot--all the more so because, like its predecessor,

this was filmed in widescreen "Actionscope," but tightly cropped fullscreen, so most of the fights consist of little more than blurry elbows, chins, and torsos. (Graphic violence, nudity, sexual situations, profanity.)

Cast & Details See all »

  • Released: 1975
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Start with a plot even more nonsensical than was the case with the original STREET FIGHTER (1975), consisting solely of brutal fights and lame transitional sequences to set them up. Then take out the fights. What you're left with is a sorry, discombobulate… (more)

Show More »

Trending TonightSee all »