Proof

Australian filmmaker Jocelyn Moorhouse made an auspicious debut with PROOF, a dry, dark comedy about a blind photographer and his efforts to find someone to trust. The disabled individual in question, Martin (Hugo Weaving), does little but walk his dog in the park and take pictures, using a modern auto-focus camera and aiming at sounds, or objects he feels...read more

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Australian filmmaker Jocelyn Moorhouse made an auspicious debut with PROOF, a dry, dark comedy about a blind photographer and his efforts to find someone to trust. The disabled individual in question, Martin (Hugo Weaving), does little but walk his dog in the park and take pictures,

using a modern auto-focus camera and aiming at sounds, or objects he feels with his hands. Since he can never see what he shoots, he needs someone to describe what he has photographed. Martin's housekeeper, Celia (Genevieve Picot), is an attractive but dour figure who has become obsessed with her

employer, and is constantly trying to seduce him. The two are locked in battle, Martin despising Celia and she tormenting him in infinite, petty ways. A new factor enters the equation when Martin befriends Andy (Russell Crowe), a likable restaurant dishwasher.

PROOF unfolds with the clarity and purity of a fable. The metaphor of the blind photographer is an intriguing premise, and Moorhouse sustains it brilliantly as a way of commenting on the extent to which we all depend on those around us for confirmation of our own perceptions. For all its cerebral

thematics, however, what is most remarkable about PROOF is how firmly and easily it stays on a human level. Moorhouse has written three full, rich characters who come vividly alive as acted by the excellent cast. Though the film is unabashedly unrealistic from the outset, it never for a moment

feels contrived.

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