Paris Was A Woman

  • 1996
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Documentary

Engaging despite itself, this earnest documentary offers a revisionist account of the legendary Paris of the `20s, ignoring the macho legacy of Hemingway in favor of a look at the women who went there to write, paint and throw off the repressive customs of home. Writer Andrea Weiss and director Greta Schiller assemble a beguiling collection of interviews...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

Rating:

Engaging despite itself, this earnest documentary offers a revisionist account of the legendary Paris of the `20s, ignoring the macho legacy of Hemingway in favor of a look at the women who went there to write, paint and throw off the repressive customs of home. Writer

Andrea Weiss and director Greta Schiller assemble a beguiling collection of interviews and archival material, but present it in so dreary and technically inept a fashion that they nearly manage the impossible: making these women dull. Vintage interviews with Shakespeare & Company bookstore founder

Sylvia Beach and New Yorker writer Janet Flanner -- whose "Letter From Paris" column went a long way to popularizing the image of 1920s Paris as a hotbed of expatriate creativity -- are enchanting, but marred by poor sound quality. German refugee photographer Gisele Freund is a vibrant

witness to the time, but her accent and quavering voice cry out for subtitles. The filmmakers' great find is Berthe Cleyrergue, longtime housekeeper for American dilettante Natalie Barney, through whose salon most of the movie's subjects drifted. The tiny, wrinkled Cleyrergue seems to have total

recall for the trivial: who liked to talk about shopping, what was served for lunch, how much liquor various literary lights knocked back and what the result was -- in short, the sort of intimate history that brings historical figures to life.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Released: 1996
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Engaging despite itself, this earnest documentary offers a revisionist account of the legendary Paris of the `20s, ignoring the macho legacy of Hemingway in favor of a look at the women who went there to write, paint and throw off the repressive customs of… (more)

Show More »

Trending TonightSee all »