My Reputation

  • 1946
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Romance

Critics didn't much care for this picture, but the public, tired of war movies, flocked to see it, and it was a large success. The studio finished the shooting at the beginning of March, 1944, but waited until after January 1, 1946 before releasing it. Stanwyck has just buried her husband in the wealthy area of Lake Forest, Illinois, and is now faced with...read more

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Critics didn't much care for this picture, but the public, tired of war movies, flocked to see it, and it was a large success. The studio finished the shooting at the beginning of March, 1944, but waited until after January 1, 1946 before releasing it. Stanwyck has just buried her husband

in the wealthy area of Lake Forest, Illinois, and is now faced with the prospect of raising her two young sons, Cooper and Beckett, alone. If she lives frugally, she can stay in the large home and manage. With her husband gone, she throws herself into work for the war effort and devotes herself to

the boys, while fending off the advances of the various men (all married) who think she is fair game for their romantic ploys. Her sons are going through puberty, and Stanwyck realizes that she has to let go of them and make her own way, so they are sent away to school. Totally alone, she is very

unhappy and not made any happier by her mother, Watson, who is always attempting to fix her up with eligible men. Stanwyck's best friend is Arden, who is married to Ridgely, and the couple prevail upon Stanwyck to put a little fun in her life and join them in the mountains for a bit of shussing

and slaloming. On holiday, she meets rakish Brent, a military man on leave, and he puts a move on her, but she resists him in a conservative fashion and will not have an affair without benefit of a gold ring. She returns to her home, where Anderson, a stodgy type, wants to marry her. Watson likes

Anderson and tries to encourage Stanwyck to accept the ho-hummer's proposal. She goes to a local nightclub where she meets Brent again, and although the attraction is evident, Brent is a confirmed bachelor and will offer her nothing more than a romp in the hay. Stanwyck feels she must decide

between the boring Anderson and the exciting Brent. Meanwhile, there is some talk about her and Brent, and tongues wag with the speed of flags in a hurricane. Soon, her sons hear about her involvement (benign though it may be) with Brent and turn against her because they feel she is insulting the

memory of their late father. Stanwyck takes Brent to a party tossed by Maricle, a neighbor and accomplished gossip, and she gives the woman what for. Later, Brent informs Stanwyck that he is being shipped from Illinois to New York and then going off to Europe. She'd like to go east with him but

thinks that it might destroy her relationship with her boys if she does. But Brent says he is in love with Stanwyck and plans to marry her when he returns, after the war has been won. Brent leaves on a train as Stanwyck waves goodbye and the picture ends. Lots of suds, a so-so score by Steiner,

and a generally sappy performance by Brent are what mar this film, but the fault must be laid at Bernhardt's direction, which was sluggish, despite the use of camera trickery that did little more than subtract from the story's soapy content.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Critics didn't much care for this picture, but the public, tired of war movies, flocked to see it, and it was a large success. The studio finished the shooting at the beginning of March, 1944, but waited until after January 1, 1946 before releasing it. Sta… (more)

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