My Man

  • 1928
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

More than one-third of this musical was silent and that jarred audiences who were expecting to see and hear the great Brice do her stuff. She runs a theatrical costume shop, but her biggest problem is her wild sister, Murphy, who gets involved with Broadway producer de Segurola, then gets tossed aside by him. Meanwhile, Brice is having a fling with Williams,...read more

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More than one-third of this musical was silent and that jarred audiences who were expecting to see and hear the great Brice do her stuff. She runs a theatrical costume shop, but her biggest problem is her wild sister, Murphy, who gets involved with Broadway producer de Segurola, then gets

tossed aside by him. Meanwhile, Brice is having a fling with Williams, a physical culture demonstrator who works in a store window, whom she saves from the police when he is found sleeping on a park bench. Murphy watches Brice and Williams prepare to get married, then she puts the vamp on the

musclebound oaf and steals him away. While Brice, who has gotten to be a big star in a manner that only Hollywood screenwriters can concoct, is singing a big song, Williams is in the theater with Murphy and decides that his heart belongs to Brice, so he dumps the sister and marches backstage. The

whole movie is little more than an excuse for Brice's clowning and singing and she gets a chance to show movie audiences why she was so popular with the Broadway crowd as she does several sketches and songs in the course of the film. The story was written by Darryl Zanuck (using his pen name) but

the sketches were from Brice's act and include her famous "Mrs. Cohen at the Beach" routine. Songs include: "I'd Rather Be Blue" (Billy Rose, Fred Fisher), "I Was a Flora Dora Baby" (Harry Carroll, Ballard MacDonald). "Second Hand Rose" (James Hanley, Grant Clarke), "I'm an Indian" (Leo Edwards,

Blanche Merrill), "If You Want to Have a Rainbow" (Rose, Oscar Levant, Mort Dixon), and, of course, "My Man" (adapted by Channing Pollock from Maurice Yvain's French tune "Mon Homme"). This is not to be confused with the all-silent picture of the same name that starred Patsy Ruth Miller for

Vitagraph in 1924.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: More than one-third of this musical was silent and that jarred audiences who were expecting to see and hear the great Brice do her stuff. She runs a theatrical costume shop, but her biggest problem is her wild sister, Murphy, who gets involved with Broadwa… (more)

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