Midnight 2: Sex, Death And Videotape

  • 1993
  • NR
  • Horror

Writer-director John A. Russo sequelizes his 1980 cult film MIDNIGHT with this abysmal production, whose cheap shot-on-video look is the least of its problems. The story concerns Abraham (Matthew Jason Walsh), the only survivor of the first film's family of murderers who slaughtered children and young people, spurred on by their mother, who convinced...read more

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Writer-director John A. Russo sequelizes his 1980 cult film MIDNIGHT with this abysmal production, whose cheap shot-on-video look is the least of its problems.

The story concerns Abraham (Matthew Jason Walsh), the only survivor of the first film's family of murderers who slaughtered children and young people, spurred on by their mother, who convinced them that demons dwelt in the bodies of their victims. Now living in the city, the twentysomething

Abraham walks the streets with his video camera, using it as a lure to encourage young women to come home with them, where he can kill them for their "impurity." After he brings home and murders one victim, Jane (Lori Scarlett), the latter's roommate, Rebecca (Jo Norcia), becomes suspicious and

goes to police lieutenant David Morgan (Chuck Pierce) with her story. She remembers that she and Jane had talked with Abraham before Jane's disappearance, and David agrees to help her track him down.

Rebecca goes back to the park and again encounters Abraham, and talks the reticent David, who has become attracted to her, into letting her go on a date with Abraham in the interest of uncovering evidence. But Abraham is on to them, and kidnaps David outside his apartment, taking him to his

basement and torturing the cop before killing him. Rebecca and Abraham go on their date, but she becomes incensed at his overanxious manner and blurts out her motivation for going with him. Telling her that he has footage of Jane's killer on one of his tapes at home, Abraham brings Rebecca back to

his house, where she discovers David's body and realizes the truth. Attempting to escape, Rebecca runs to an abandoned building, where Abraham ultimately traps and kills her. He is last seen still prowling the city streets, looking for victims.

As the synopsis suggests, complexity of plot is not one of MIDNIGHT 2's strong points, and what's amazing is that several minutes of this 68-minute production are taken up by flashbacks to the first film. (Next to DOLLMAN VS. DEMONIC TOYS, this is the most padded yet shortest video release in

memory.) These grainy film inserts sit uneasily alongside the new, home movie-level video footage, and it's sad to note that Russo, who clearly went for this shooting format to keep costs down, hasn't come up with anything in the way of inventive storytelling to compensate. The movie is bereft of

subplots (with the exception of a couple of additional murders committed by Abraham), and although Russo was here able to incorporate the nihilistic ending he wanted to use, but couldn't, in the first film, the complete lack of rooting interest makes it hard to care.

It doesn't help that Abraham is such a disagreeable, uninteresting antihero, thanks to Walsh's whiny delivery and the character's misogynist voice-overs (having sex with his victims before killing them is "part of the punishment," he says). It's also completely inconceivable how any of his

potential victims are attracted by his come-ons, which consist of repartee like "Come on, I'm taping you, not raping you." The rest of the cast are noticeable amateurs, though Norcia deserves credit for attacking her role with wide-eyed enthusiasm, and Russo brings no style (or even interesting

makeup effects for the gorehounds) to the murder scenes. (Graphic violence, nudity, sexual situations, profanity.)

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  • Released: 1993
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Writer-director John A. Russo sequelizes his 1980 cult film MIDNIGHT with this abysmal production, whose cheap shot-on-video look is the least of its problems. The story concerns Abraham (Matthew Jason Walsh), the only survivor of the first film's famil… (more)

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